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I am looking for a good and short article+examples of how working with interfaces. I am not interesting the technical part, but I need the design part. For example, how to programming using interfaces, when and how create implementations, design patterns for regular development with interfaces.

I have many similar classes that repeat themselves in several ways. I want to use interfaces and abstract classes in order to make things more modular - but I can't find out how to do it properly.

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4 Answers 4

An interface defines a contract. It's a promise that an object will behave a certain way. Before learning about interfaces, you tend to think about objects in concrete terms. For example, suppose we have a list of products:

List<string> products = new List<string>() { "desktop", "laptop", "server" };

And we have a method that prints out our products:

void PrintProducts(List<string> products)
{
     foreach (string product in products)
     { 
          Console.WriteLine(product);
     }
}

Our method is coupled to the concrete type of a List. Does it need to be though? There's plenty of different types of collections in C#: Lists, Arrays, ReadOnlyCollection, etc. All you really need to do is loop through them. A list has a lot of methods that an array doesn't, but you're not using any of them here. Fortunately, they all implement the interface IEnumerable. That means they all are "contractually bound" to be able to be enumerated.

Changing the method like so:

void PrintProducts(IEnumerable<string> products)
{
     foreach (string product in products)
     { 
          Console.WriteLine(product);
     }
}

means that you can now pass in an array, or a list, or some unique container you yourself create.

Another example: Suppose you have a repository of data:

public class DatabaseRepository
{
    public void AddProduct(Product product)
    {
        // connect to the database
        // add the product
    }
}

And you have some class that needs this database:

public class ProductManager
{
    DatabaseRepository _repository;

    public ProductManager(DatabaseRepository repository)
    {
         _repository= repository;
    }
}

Unfortunately, this class is tied to your database. What if you decide to change to storing as an XML file, or storing in some cloud key-value store. You would have to change your ProductManager, which is difficult and error prone. Suppose instead though we defined an interface:

public interface IRepository {
    void AddProduct(Product product);
}

Changing our ProductManager class to use this interface instead:

public class ProductManager
{
    IRepository _repository;

    public ProductManager(IRepository repository)
    {
         _repository= repository;
    }
}

means that no matter what type repository it is, we know that there will always be a method AddProduct(Product product). We can now create our XML repository:

public class XMLRepository : IRepository 
{
    public void AddProduct(Product product)
    {
         // write to an XML file
    }
}

Now, we are free to pass in either repository:

ProductManager manager = new ProductManager(new DatabaseRepository())

or

ProductManager manager = new ProductManager(new XMLRepository())

and our ProductManager behaves exactly the same. It is completely unaware of what the concrete type is.

This becomes very useful when you get into unit testing. Inversion of Control is something you will want to read up on when you get a firm understanding of how interfaces work.

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Thanks, this is really helpful and I understand that. I am just looking for example of how using interfaces in real life big projects. some kind of general design pattern for the project of guidelines of how to create objects (when using interfaces and when not) etc.. –  Naor Mar 24 '11 at 1:23
    
There's really not a 'design pattern' for interfaces. Interfaces are a construct of the language that makes things more flexible. You could presumably use all the design patterns without ever using an interface. The last example of the ProductManager class though is an example of a reason why you'd want to use it on a large product. It lets each of your subsystems stay loosely coupled to one another. I just recently switched to using Azure storage from filesystem storage. It was trivial because with facades and interfaces, I didn't need to change a bunch of classes. –  mfanto Mar 24 '11 at 1:53
    
I understand what you meen, but still - I need a "method" of how to use those interfaces. It doesn't seem logical to create interface for each class I have - right? so when and how should I use them? –  Naor Mar 24 '11 at 1:58
    
I know what you're looking for in the answer, heh, but I'm not sure how to answer it in a way that makes sense right now :). I have a better idea. Give me an example of something in your application. Your database layer, your email layer, etc. I can maybe explain how you'd use an interface for that, rather than talking about abstract concepts and simple examples. But yes, you might in fact have lots of interfaces. Interfaces are critical for unit testing, so pretty much all of my classes have their own interface. –  mfanto Mar 24 '11 at 4:52

This book as been the canonical reference for design patterns and contains examples of using interfaces. However you may want to start at an even more fundamental level. Thinking in Java is what got me into object oriented programming, there are likely similar titles for C# though the content of the book should be mostly agnostic of the language. You may also search for online tutorials on object oriented programming.

Edit: Great book about patterns and their implementation and usage in C# is C# 3.0 Design Patterns

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+1 for GoF book –  user381105 Mar 23 '11 at 23:58
    
@pavelrappo GoF book isn't reading for someone asking WHAT are interfaces –  dantuch Mar 24 '11 at 1:20
    
@dantuch there are no patterns just about interfaces. Most patterns use interfaces essentially. So this separation looks meaningless to me. –  Andrey Mar 24 '11 at 1:32

@Naor, its seems, based on your above comment "It doesn't seem logical to create interface for each class I have - right?" that the best book for you to read is HEAD FIRST; DESIGN PATTERNS - it has an incredible and easy way of teaching how to use an apply design patterns. I first read of them in this book and it has definetly changed my mind!!! By reading this you'll be able to read more complicated stuff like Martin Fowler, Patterns of Enterprise Application Archtecture - which I believe approaches exatcly what you want, real world applicatoins of patterns. Going straight to to GoF, or M. Fowler, or more complicated stuff may disspoint you or make you just lose time.

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When To Use Interfaces An interface allows somebody to start from scratch to implement your interface or implement your interface in some other code whose original or primary purpose was quite different from your interface. To them, your interface is only incidental, something that have to add on to the their code to be able to use your package. The disadvantage is every method in the interface must be public. You might not want to expose everything.

When To Use Abstract classes An abstract class, in contrast, provides more structure. It usually defines some default implementations and provides some tools useful for a full implementation. The catch is, code using it must use your class as the base. That may be highly inconvenient if the other programmers wanting to use your package have already developed their own class hierarchy independently. In Java, a class can inherit from only one base class.

or read this: http://mindprod.com/jgloss/interfacevsabstract.html

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