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Terr!

HTML::Table has pretty good flexibility to form HTML-tables from perl data structures, but i did not found proper way how to have th-tags different than ordinary cells (td) in same column. Or let me rephrase: if i set column class, i'd like to set it only for data rows, not for header row.

use strict;
use warnings;
use HTML::Table;

my $table = new HTML::Table(
                -head=> ['one', 'two', 'eleven'],
                -data=> [ ['yki', 'kaki', 'kommi'], 
                        ['yy', 'kaa', 'koo'] ] 
);

$table->setColClass(1, 'class');
$table->setSectionColClass('tbody', 0, 2, 'class2');
print $table;

And output is:

<table>
<tbody>
<tr><th class="class">one</th><th class="class2">two</th><th>eleven</th></tr>
<tr><td class="class">yki</td><td class="class2">kaki</td><td>kommi</td></tr>
<tr><td class="class">yy</td><td class="class2">kaa</td><td>koo</td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>

Output i am looking for:

<table>
<tbody>
<tr><th>one</th><th>two</th><th>eleven</th></tr>
<tr><td class="class">yki</td><td class="class2">kaki</td><td>kommi</td></tr>
<tr><td class="class">yy</td><td class="class2">kaa</td><td>koo</td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>

There are section level methods, but th belongs also in tbody. Tables may be pretty complex, so i'd like to avoid iterating over the heading row and hope to find a decent way. Is there?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Might be easies to just tweak your CSS a bit. Presumably you have something like this in your stylesheet:

.class { /* Some pretty stuff */ }

So just change the selector to adjust how the header and body cells are styled:

td.class { /* The styles you want applied to body cells go here. */ }
th.class { /* And the styles for header cells (if any) go here.  */ }

If you don't want any styling applied to the header cells then include the td.class { } bit in your stylesheet and leave the th.class { } out; there's nothing wrong with having a CSS class attached to an element that doesn't match anything in your stylesheets.

share|improve this answer
    
So i do now, but i'd like to use more elegant solution. If i don't use class-attribute on th, i'd like to avoid it, too. That's why i did not tag it as html or css ;) –  w.k Mar 24 '11 at 2:59
    
I'd actually call the CSS approach an elegant solution. But one person's elegant solution is another's hack :) –  mu is too short Mar 24 '11 at 4:18

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