Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have general purpose bookmarklet, which begins with:

javascript:with (window.open("")) {/* lots of irrelevant characters */

It works as should (opens new window and writes a report about page elements, specifically), however fails on certain pages, when authors decide what open is a good name for function:

/* somewhere in global scope */
function open() { /* something */ }

... effectively replacing window.open and breaking bookmarklet operation. By the nature of bookmarklet i cannot do anything to prevent such misbehaviour.

Is there any way to call original native window.open to recover in this cases? Please note, my primary browser is Opera, i really want to make it work in there.

share|improve this question
window.constructor.prototype.open

Nope, sorry. You can do some hackery to get a new one though :)

var ifr = document.createElement('iframe');
document.body.appendChild(ifr);
ifr.contentWindow.open(...)

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, thanks. Thinking out of the box is great, i was digging into prototypes while could just easily obtain a fresh copy :-) – Free Consulting Mar 24 '11 at 3:45
    
didn't think of that! window.constructor.prototype.open – zyklus Mar 24 '11 at 3:47
    
FYI: Firefox allows to delete window.open revealing a native metdod. – Free Consulting Mar 24 '11 at 3:48
    
hehe, also nice. Of course you break the page you're on if you do that. – zyklus Mar 24 '11 at 3:49
    
wait, wait, it is undefined in Opera, tried that before, their window implementation seems to be special – Free Consulting Mar 24 '11 at 4:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.