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Help iv'e seen other questions but I'm a beginner with c#

Code:

namespace Input_Program
{
    class Program
    {
       static void Main()
        {
           char Y = Console.ReadKey().KeyChar;

           Console.WriteLine("Welcome to my bool program!");
           Console.WriteLine("Input a NON capital y or n when told to.");

            if(Y == 'y')
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Thank you,Please wait.....");
                Console.WriteLine("You input Y");

                else;
                {
                    if(Y == 'n')
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("You input N");
            }
        }
    }
           Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this question
    
What did he change? –  unknown Mar 24 '11 at 1:59
    
Oh the tags!!!! –  unknown Mar 24 '11 at 1:59
3  
I understand that you are a beginner and you are learning. One thing that you want to embed in your mind is to keep consistent formatting. Every time you start a new block by using a left curly brace {, you should indent every following line an additional level and keep everything lined up until you reach a matching right curly brace }. Had you done that, you could have easily seen that there are problems with your code. Curly braces are not matched, you have statements where they shouldn't be, etc. Visual Studio will even help you with indentation as long as you follow it. –  Jeff Mercado Mar 24 '11 at 2:03
    
Thanks Jeff person –  unknown Mar 24 '11 at 2:15
    
You can use the CTRL+K,D to automatically reformat your document. –  Brent Stewart Mar 24 '11 at 3:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should not have the semicolon after the else, and you're missing a closing paren before the else.

namespace Input_Program
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            char Y = Console.ReadKey().KeyChar;
            Console.WriteLine("Welcome to my bool program!");
            Console.WriteLine("Input a NON capital y or n when told to.");
            if(Y == 'y')
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Thank you,Please wait.....");
                Console.WriteLine("You input Y");
            }
            else
            {
                if(Y == 'n')
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("You input N");
                }
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}        
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks and nice picture –  unknown Mar 24 '11 at 1:57
    
Tried the semicolon trick but it says it expected ; after the else –  unknown Mar 24 '11 at 1:58
5  
Just because the compiler says it expected something doesn't mean the correct answer is to put it there. :) –  Greg Hewgill Mar 24 '11 at 2:02
    
You have a closing bracket in the wrong place. Remove the } just before the Console.Readline(); –  Alex Ford Mar 24 '11 at 2:05
    
@Chevex: I removed the offending }. Thanks! –  Greg Mar 24 '11 at 3:22

You need a closing brace } after the two statements controlled by the if (just before the else). Also, remove the semicolon after the else once you've done that.

share|improve this answer

else does not have a semicolon after it, and you need to close your curly braces. Redo your syntax:

if(Y == 'y'){
 Console.WriteLine("Thank you,Please wait.....");
 Console.WriteLine("You input Y");
}
else{
 if(Y == 'n'){
  Console.WriteLine("You input N");  
 }      
}

EDIT: else{if(Y== 'n'){...}} would be good to refactor as else if(Y=='n'){...}

share|improve this answer

Anything that uses curly braces is a "block of code". When you define a class you define a block of code within curly braces like this:

public class MyClass
{

}

Things within the curly braces are considered to be "in that scope". For example:

public class MyClass
{
    // This method is in the scope of MyClass
    public void MyMethod()
    {
        // This variable is in the scope of MyMethod.
        // It is only accessible from within this method because that is where
        // it is defined.
        string myString = "Hello Method.";
    }

    // This variable is in the scope of MyClass.
    // It is accessible within MyClass, including all methods that are also in scope
    // of MyClass
    public string myGlobalString = "Hello Global.";
}

In the case of IF statements, they are a series of block statements and can only be contained within method scope (you couldn't use an IF statement in a class for instance). The code can only travel one of the given paths provided by the statement. For example:

public class MyClass
{
    public void MyMethod(string myString)
    {
        if (myString == "Hello")
        {
            // Read like English. "If variable myString equals the value 'Hello', then do this code within this block."
        }
        else if (myString == "Goodbye")
        {
            // "...or else if variable myString equals the value 'Goodbye', then do this code within this block instead.
        }
        else if (myString == "Good Morning")
        {
            // "...or else if variable myString equals the value 'Good Morning', then do this code within this block instead.
        }
        else
        {
            // "...or else do this code if variable myString does not match any of the above code statements.
        }

        // You are not required to include "else" or even "else if". You could just do a single IF statement like this:
        if (myString == "hi)
        {
            // "If variable myString equals the value 'hi' then do this, otherwise do nothing."
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I noticed two things

if(Y == 'y')
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Thank you,Please wait.....");
            Console.WriteLine("You input Y");
            // you need to close the if with a } on this line     
            else; //no semicolon after else
            {
                if(Y == 'n')
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("You input N");
                }
             }
        }
share|improve this answer
{
    char Y = Console.ReadKey().KeyChar;
    Console.WriteLine("Welcome to my bool program!")
    Console.WriteLine("Input a NON capital y or n when told to.");

    if(Y == 'y')
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Thank you,Please wait.....");
        Console.WriteLine("You input Y");    
    }else
    {
        if(Y == 'n')
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You input N");
        }
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}

Matching up your indentations should help you see where you need/don't need closing curly brackets and you don't put a semi colon after the else.

You can also change your structure to just be if/else, or two if's and get the same result.

{
    char Y = Console.ReadKey().KeyChar;
    Console.WriteLine("Welcome to my bool program!")
    Console.WriteLine("Input a NON capital y or n when told to.");

    if(Y == 'y')
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Thank you,Please wait.....");
        Console.WriteLine("You input Y");    
    }

    if(Y == 'n')
    {
        Console.WriteLine("You input N");
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer

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