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I am busy building an application in which I am reading data from more two files of "records". I have a very strange error, which pops up depending on the sequence in which I open the files (see code below).

If I click button1 followed by button 2, thus calling the file of "weather data records" followed by the file of "parameters records", all is fine. If I do this the other way around, I get a "stack overflow" followed by "access violation at 0x7c90e898: write of address" error. This happens when I call SetLength for the array in Button1Click.

The weather data file has about 550 records, and the parameters file has about 45 records.

Can anyone see anything obvious wrong with my code? I am not sure how to attach files, or make them available, if anyone wants to use them to test...

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, StdCtrls, Buttons, ExtCtrls, Grids,FileCtrl,Contnrs;

type  
    TWeatherData = record  
    MyDate : TDate;  
    Rainfall : Double;  
    Temperature : Double;  

  end;

  TParameters = record
    Species : string[50];
    ParameterName: string[50];
    ParameterValue : double;
  end;

  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    Button2: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
    procedure Button2Click(Sender: TObject);

  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
Var
  WeatherDataFile : file of TWeatherData;
  j : integer;
  WeatherDataArray : array of TWeatherData;
  MyFileSize : Integer;

begin


  AssignFile(WeatherDataFile,'C:\Test5.cmbwthr') ;
  Reset(WeatherDataFile);
  MyFileSize := FileSize(WeatherDataFile);

  SetLength(WeatherDataArray,MyFileSize);

  j := 0;

  try
   while not Eof(WeatherDataFile) do begin
    j := j + 1;
    Read (WeatherDataFile, WeatherDataArray[j]) ;
   end;
  finally
   CloseFile(WeatherDataFile) ;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  ParametersFile : file of TParameters;
  j : integer;
  CurrentParameters : array of TParameters;
  MyFileSize : Integer;

begin
  AssignFile(ParametersFile,'C:\Test5.cmbpara') ;
  Reset(ParametersFile);

  Reset(ParametersFile);
  MyFileSize := FileSize(ParametersFile);

  SetLength(CurrentParameters,MyFileSize);

  j := 0;

  try
   while not Eof(ParametersFile) do begin
    j := j + 1;
    Read (ParametersFile, CurrentParameters[j]) ;
   end;
  finally
   CloseFile(ParametersFile) ;
  end;
end;

end. 
share|improve this question
1  
Not went through the end, but if you do not pass the record size to Reset, you cannot get number of records by FileSize (unless a WeatherData is 128 bytes). See the documentation of the two functions. –  Sertac Akyuz Mar 24 '11 at 2:16
    
@Sertac Akyuz: Post this as an answer, using Reset(File, SizeOf(Record)) and I'll vote for it. –  Ken White Mar 24 '11 at 2:22
    
Obtaining the file size doesn't seem to be a problem. The file size that is returned from the FileSize function is accurate in both cases. And the error on SetLength is returned no matter what size I set the length to, anyway... –  David Drew Mar 24 '11 at 2:37
    
@David, can you post a link to sample files? Sertac's answer makes sense, and if it's right you could be overwriting memory somewhere. Also, do you have range checking turned on in the compiler options? –  Ken White Mar 24 '11 at 2:45
1  
@David - My bad! According to Rob's comment "RecSize parameter is only allowed for an untyped file. If the file is typed as in the question, the record size is implicit because the compiler already knows the record type." –  Sertac Akyuz Mar 24 '11 at 8:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're writing past the ends of the arrays by incrementing the index before writing to the array instead of afterward. Since you're writing into memory that doesn't belong to the array, any number of problems may occur.

AssignFile(ParametersFile, 'C:\Test5.cmbpara');
Reset(ParametersFile);
try // Enter "try" block as soon as the file is opened.
  MyFileSize := FileSize(ParametersFile);
  SetLength(CurrentParameters, MyFileSize);

  j := 0;
  while not Eof(ParametersFile) do begin
    Read(ParametersFile, CurrentParameters[j]);
    Inc(j);
  end;
finally
  CloseFile(ParametersFile);
end;

if j <> MyFileSize then
  raise Exception.CreateFmt('Parameter count mismatch: expected %d but got %d instead.',
    [MyFileSize, j]);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Rob! That was the problem. Amazing what a dramatic effect that silly mistake has! –  David Drew Mar 24 '11 at 4:08
1  
+1 Well spotted! –  Gerry Coll Mar 24 '11 at 5:26

You need packed records to save to a file.

type  
  TWeatherData = packed record  
    MyDate : TDate;  
    Rainfall : Double;  
    Temperature : Double;  
  end;

  TParameters = packed record
    Species : string[50];
    ParameterName: string[50];
    ParameterValue : double;
  end;
share|improve this answer
1  
Need is a strong word. Too strong, in fact. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 24 '11 at 4:11
    
Is there an advantage to using packed records, rather than "plain" records? –  David Drew Mar 24 '11 at 4:17
2  
@David - they are "immune" to the compiler's "Record field alignment" settings. If unpacked, the compiler will layout the record using whatever value is specified by {$An} or set in the compiler options. If packed, they will effectively be compiled with {$A1}. The effects are: 1. Minimum disk usage (not a big issue) 2. Changing compiler settings or using a different version of Delphi won't change the internal layout that your program depends on. –  Gerry Coll Mar 24 '11 at 5:23
    
Gerry, thank you. –  Clóvis Valadares Junior Mar 24 '11 at 11:50

Take a look at our TDynArray wrapper available in our SynCommons.pas unit. There is serialization feature included.

And you could put regular string inside the records, instead of shortstring: it will use less space on disk, and will be Unicode Ready since Delphi 2009.

type  
  TWeatherData = record  
    MyDate : TDate;  
    Rainfall : Double;  
    Temperature : Double;  
  end;
  TWeatherDatas = array of TWeatherData;

  TParameter = record
    Species : string;
    ParameterName: string;
    ParameterValue : double;
  end;
  TParameters = array of TParameter;

var
  Stream: TMemoryStream;
  Params: TParameters;
  Weather: TWeatherDatas;
begin
  Stream := TMemoryStream.Create;
  try
    Stream.LoadFromFile('C:\Test5.cmbpara');
    DynArray(TypeInfo(TParameters),Params).LoadFromStream(Stream));
    Stream.LoadFromFile('C:\Test5.cmbwthr');
    DynArray(TypeInfo(TWeatherDatas),Weather).LoadFromStream(Stream));
  finally
    Stream.Free;
  end;
end;

With TDynArray, you can access any dynamic array using TList-like properties and methods, e.g. Count, Add, Insert, Delete, Clear, IndexOf, Find, Sort and some new methods like LoadFromStream, SaveToStream, LoadFrom and SaveTo which allow fast binary serialization of any dynamic array, even containing strings or records - a CreateOrderedIndex method is also available to create individual index according to the dynamic array content. You can also serialize the array content into JSON, if you wish.

For Delphi 6 up to XE.

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