Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have an array and it is unsorted. We know the range is [0,n].

We want to remove duplicates but we cannot use extra arrays and it must run in linear time.

Any ideas? Just to clarify, this is not for homework!

share|improve this question
3  
language?....... –  Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Mar 24 '11 at 4:44
    
I'm not entirely sure you can do this to be honest. I mean there is counting sort, but that requires additional space. –  zellio Mar 24 '11 at 4:46
    
I'm with Mimisbrunnr -- I'm not sure this can be done. Googling suggests that using a hashmap (which probably isn't allowed, here) is the fastest, easiest way to do it; If there were a clever, linear-time algorithm that didn't require extra memory it would be easy to find. –  Haldean Brown Mar 24 '11 at 4:53
1  
Yes, it is an array of ints. You can reorder the array as long as you finish with O(n) running time. –  Geoff C. Mar 24 '11 at 4:55
1  
We know that all integers in the array are between 0 and n. –  Geoff C. Mar 24 '11 at 5:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If the integers are limited 0 to n, you can move through the array, placing numbers by their indices. Every time you replace a number, take the value that used to be there and move it to where it should be. For instance, let's say we have an array of size 8:

-----------------
|3|6|3|4|5|1|7|7|
-----------------
 S

Where S is our starting point, and we'll use C to keep track of our "current" index below. We start with index 0, and move 3 to the 3 index spot, where 4 is. Save 4 in a temp var.

-----------------
|X|6|3|3|5|1|7|7|   Saved 4 
-----------------  
 S     C

We then put 4 in the index 4, saving what used to be there, 5.

-----------------
|X|6|3|3|4|1|7|7|   Saved 5
-----------------
 S       C

Keep going

-----------------
|X|6|3|3|4|5|7|7|   Saved 1
-----------------
 S         C

-----------------
|X|1|3|3|4|5|7|7|   Saved 6
-----------------
 S C

-----------------
|X|1|3|3|4|5|6|7|   Saved 7    
-----------------
 S           C 

When we try to replace 7, we see a conflict, so we simply don't place it. We then continue from the starting index S, increment it by 1:

-----------------
|X|1|3|3|4|5|6|7| 
-----------------  
   S           

1 is fine here, 3 needs to move

-----------------
|X|1|X|3|4|5|6|7|
-----------------
     S

But 3 is a duplicate, so we throw it away and keep iterating through the rest of the array.

So basically, we move each entry at most 1 time, and iterate through the entire array. That's O(2n) = O(n)

share|improve this answer
1  
This requires additional space in some cases. What if you have { 0, 1, 20 } as your array? then you need an array of size 20. –  zellio Mar 24 '11 at 5:28
    
You probably also need to do compression of the array at the end by removing items that are marked with X above (i.e. -1 could be used to mark missing items). To remove items just go through all elements once and copy to last free space O(n) again. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 24 '11 at 5:31
1  
@Mimisbrunnr Integers are limited from 0..n, where n is the size of the array –  Jeff Mar 24 '11 at 5:32
    
hrmm, I suppose so, my bad. –  zellio Mar 24 '11 at 5:35
1  
Or did I misread? I agree this won't work if n > the size of the array. –  Jeff Mar 24 '11 at 5:38

Jeff @Jeff

if there are neighbor exchanged number series, I think the algorithm will be failed

| 1 | 0 | 3 | 2 | 5 | 4 | 

how about this one?

BR Bill

share|improve this answer

Assume int a[n] is an array of integers in the range [0,n-1]. Note that this differs slightly from the stated problem, but I make this assumption to make clear how the algorithm works. The algorithm can be patched up to work for integers in the range [0,n].

for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
{
    if (a[i] != i)
    {
         j = a[i];
         k = a[j];
         a[j] = j;  // Swap a[j] and a[i]
         a[i] = k;
     }
 }

 for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
 {
     if (a[i] == i)
     {
        printf("%d\n", i);
     }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for codifying it :) –  Jeff Mar 24 '11 at 5:48
    
in the second if it's an assignment operator instead of comparison –  Eugene Gordin May 22 '13 at 22:08

Walk through the array assign array[array[i]] = -array[array[i]]; if not negative; if its already negative then its duplicate, this will work since all values are within 0 and n.

share|improve this answer
    void printRepeating(int arr[], int size)
{
  int i;
  printf("The repeating elements are: \n");
  for(i = 0; i < size; i++)
  {
    if(arr[abs(arr[i])] >= 0)
      arr[abs(arr[i])] = -arr[abs(arr[i])];
    else
      printf(" %d ", abs(arr[i]));
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Can you sort? Sort with Radix Sort - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radix_sort with complexity O(arraySize) for given case and then remove duplicates from sorted array O(arraySize).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.