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Trying to teach myself how to pass an array from int main() to a function and I just don't understand it.

Here is my code.

#include <stdio.h>

void printboard( char *B ) {
 /*Purpose: to print out the tic tac toe board B
  */
    int i,j;

    printf("\n");
    for (i=0;i<3;i++) {
        for (j=0;j<3;j++) {
            printf( "      %c ",B[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n\n");
    }
}

int main( void ) {
    char B[3][3] = { '-','-','-',
                     '-','-','-',
                     '-','-','-' };

    printboard(B);
}

I get this error:

test.c: In function 'printboard':
test.c:12: error: subscripted value is neither array nor pointer
test.c: In function 'main':
test.c:25: warning: passing argument 1 of 'printboard' from incompatible pointer type

Just need to get an understand of how pointers work and are passed so I can go ahead with my work.

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Passing multiarrays into functions through pointer – Jens Gustedt Mar 24 '11 at 7:13
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two dimensional array decays to a pointer to one dimensional array (i.e., (*)[] )

So, change from -

void printboard( char *B ) 
{
   // ....
}

to

void printboard( char B[][3] )
                 // Compiler is not bothered about first index because it 
                 // converts to (*)[3]. So, is the reason it left empty.
{
    // ...
}

Also, two dimensional array initialization should be done this way -

char B[3][3] = { {'-','-','-'},
                 {'-','-','-'},
                 {'-','-','-'}
               };

Check Results

share|improve this answer
    
@wes - The way you initialize is also correct. Because B[][3], says it has 3 rows. So, with 9 elements the array should obviously have 3 columns. So, it has no problem and infact equal to B[][3] even while initialization. Keeping {} for each of the 3 elements improves redability. – Mahesh Mar 24 '11 at 6:40
    
Thank you - so if I'm understanding correctly, if it were a 1 dimensional array it would be *B but because its a two dimensional array, i need to point towards a "decayed" 1 dimensional array? – wesbos Mar 24 '11 at 18:04
    
@Wes - If it's a 1D array, it decays to be a pointer pointing to first element of the array ( T*) and a 2D array decays to a pointer pointing to the 1D array ( T (*)[] ). – Mahesh Mar 24 '11 at 18:35

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