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Following Dmitry Korolev tutorial on TopCoder i encountered this generic-container-traverse macro:

#define tr(c,i) for(typeof((c).begin() i = (c).begin(); i != (c).end(); i++) 

It confuses me because it appears to be missing a parenthesis. And in the explanation he says that typeof(...) is replaced by the type of the expression (...) , which makes me more confused with this traverse macro (since my intuition sees typeof (x ; y ; z) and would not work since x;y;z is not a expression and even if it worked typeof(...) would "eat" the (...)).

Does it work? why?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
#define tr(container, it) \ 
 for(typeof(container.begin()) it = container.begin(); \ 
                               it != container.end(); \
                                it++
    )

This is what he has written which is syntactically correct. BTW typeof is a gcc extension and won't work in other compilers.

If your compiler supports C++0x you might want to use auto

For example the same macro can be written in C++0x as

#define tr(container, it) \ 
 for(auto it = container.begin(); \ 
          it != container.end(); \
          it++
    )
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thanks! C++0x looks great, but i guess most competition judges do not use it yet. But most of them use gcc/g++ so i will be using the first version. –  Alessandro Stamatto Mar 24 '11 at 14:57

It's a typo. Should be:

#define tr(c,i) for(typeof((c).begin()) i = (c).begin(); i != (c).end(); i++)
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It would work fine if there was an extra paren after typeof((c).begin(). I don't know what the original source was, but if it was actually missing a paren, the original person who put it probably typed it wrong.

#define tr(c,i) for(typeof((c).begin()) i = (c).begin(); i != (c).end(); i++)

Can be used in place of the top line of a for loop over a container. eg:

tr(myvector, i)
{
    std::cout << *i;
}
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This is wrong. It should be:

#define tr(c,i) for(typeof((c).begin()) i = (c).begin(); i != (c).end(); i++)
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