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I'm sure its something simple on my part, but I can't figure out why my compiler thinks one of my classes is abstract. Here's the situation:

I have an abstract base class like so:

class AnimatedDraw
{
public:
    virtual void Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window) = 0;
    virtual void Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window, sf::Shader shader) = 0;
    virtual void Update(sf::Clock &time) = 0;
};

And I inherit from it as so:

class ScreenLayer : public AnimatedDraw
{
public:
    ScreenLayer(void);

    virtual void Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window);

    virtual void Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window, sf::Shader &shader);

    virtual void Update(sf::Clock &clock);

    ~ScreenLayer(void);
};

for reference, the ScreenLayer.cpp file is as follows:

#include "ScreenLayer.h"
ScreenLayer::ScreenLayer(void)
{
}
void ScreenLayer::Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window)
{
}
void ScreenLayer::Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window, sf::Shader &shader)
{
}
void ScreenLayer::Update(sf::Clock &clock)
{
}
ScreenLayer::~ScreenLayer(void)
{
}

However, when I try to use my derived class (i.e. AnimatedDraw *testDrawer = new ScreenLayer; ) my compiler complains the ScreenLayer is abstract. Changing AnimatedDraw to ScreenLayer was also invalid for the same reason. I overwrote all the abstract function on my base class didn't I? I'm not sure why it's being seen as abstract. Any help would be appreciated

Thanks

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2  
@user: I am almost certain that your compiler will give you an error that says which method causes the class to be abstract. –  Björn Pollex Mar 24 '11 at 7:35
    
Also declare a virtual destructor in the base class. –  Alexandre C. Mar 24 '11 at 7:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Your base class declaration doesn't have an ampersand after sf::Shader:

virtual void Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window, sf::Shader shader) = 0;

The derived class has, hence it's a different overloaded function.

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5  
Technically speaking, function in derived class hides one in base class, not overloads. –  Alexander Poluektov Mar 24 '11 at 7:39
    
woops.. sorry I didn't see that. Thanks for finding the mistake –  Megatron Mar 24 '11 at 7:41
    
It's a mistake I've made as well, that's how I knew what to look for :) –  sashoalm Mar 24 '11 at 7:47
    
In C++0x, you will be able to add attributes to your functions, such as override (in the Derived class) for the compiler to check that your method actually overrides something and warns you otherwise. –  Matthieu M. Mar 24 '11 at 8:10

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