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When create playramework's model we can use save() or _save() method. Why these both methods are avalible in the framework, what's the reason? (in this context they do the same - save object to db).

Why I ask this: I have used save() method when doing some validation in it, but the end-user of my class could use _save() if he would want to save without validation. So I ask myself why there are two methods which are both public.

I've handled it like this: The problem was with finding the place for making the validation while saving. In fact I've handled this issue using @PrePersist anotation for some method near the save() when I want to be sure that validation code would be invoced when persisting. So now I'm ok with save() and _save() :)

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Actually, look at the code of save():

/**
 * store (ie insert) the entity.
 */
public <T extends JPABase> T save() {
    _save();
    return (T) this;
}

So it simply calls _save() and return itself in order to chain calls.
_save is the function containing the real business logic.
save is just a more practical facade for active record design.
Why is _save public and not protected for example ? I don't really know.

_save() can be called without any problem IMO but it returns void. That's all ;)

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Yep. As for me it would be more logical if some of this methods would be protected. Then I could use one method with validation and other without that, and nobody from outside could use the method without validation, it would be reasonable. –  ses Mar 24 '11 at 13:08
1  
There might be a reason but only a play developer could tell us ;). Anyway, protected is so restrictive in Java and there are no friend class in Java, so I imagine people tend not to use protected in order to keep all ways opened. –  mandubian Mar 25 '11 at 9:57
1  
The problem was with finding the place for making the validation while saving. In fact I've handled this issue using @PrePersist anotation for some method near the save() when I want to be sure that validation code would be invoced when persisting. So now I'm ok with save() and _save() :) –  ses Mar 26 '11 at 11:02
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