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How secure is Spring Security? Is it good enough to use Spring Security in web application for banking system or something equivalent?

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Spring Security itself is neither secure or insecure. Whether or not it's secure depends on how you use it. –  skaffman Mar 24 '11 at 10:32
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If i use it in "most secure way", will be enough secure ? –  marioosh Mar 24 '11 at 10:35
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up vote 12 down vote accepted

Spring Security in itself is very good. It is widely used and any problems are sorted out with high priority. However, as with most technologies, if you use it improperly, your application will not be secure.

If I use it in "most secure way", will be enough secure? - Yes

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Thank for Your opinion. Do You have some hints for "most secure way" using of Spring Security ? –  marioosh Mar 28 '11 at 10:45
    
Agreed. I am working on a webapp and the client decided to use Spring Security. We discovered 2 years later that any authenticated user could do anything within the app: there was just no authorization mechanism. –  Emmanuel Ballerini Feb 22 '12 at 15:11
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Spring security is one of the best things that the Spring frameworks offers, it highly capable of taking care of both authentication and authorization.

The challenge is to model it correctly with right key elements of the framework being put in the right place. I have tried to illustrate its capabilities on one of my blog posts, refer http://www.nimblegeek.com/2012/08/role-base-application-modelling-using.html

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Why the downvote? –  Austin Henley Oct 4 '12 at 0:09
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Be careful applying Spring Security to applications require high level of security such as banking security system. First of all put your attention securing your application with strong cryptographic methods and securing data channel. then you can integrate it to some framework such Spring Security.

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Earlier versions of Spring security (known as acegi back in the day) required quite a large amount of configuration and it was therefore possible to miss something and leave a hole in your security. Recent versions have significantly reduced the complexity and now use sensible defaults.

However Spring still remains extremely flexible and extensible which gives developers great power, but as always power comes with responsibility. As far as Spring security is concerned a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, I'd strongly recommend that you get a good understanding of the framework before undertaking any customization. It's also a good idea to get involved on the forums and ask the communityto peer review high risk areas of code/customization.

We've implemented Spring security for many banks and other financial institutions both in the US and Europe so in that sense it's definitely "fit for purpose"

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