Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Surely there has to be many ways to optimize the following code, where I basically have to make sure that a lot of textboxes aren't empty and then read their values:

if (foo1.Text.Length != 0 & bar1.Text.Length != 0)
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo1.Text + " / " + bar1.Text;
}

if (foo2.Text.Length != 0 & bar2.Text.Length != 0)
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo2.Text + " / " + bar2.Text;
}

if (foo3.Text.Length != 0 & bar3.Text.Length != 0)
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo3.Text + " / " + bar3.Text;
}

if (foo4.Text.Length != 0 & bar4.Text.Length != 0)
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo4.Text + " / " + bar4.Text;
}

if (foo5.Text.Length != 0 & bar5.Text.Length != 0) 
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo5.Text + " / " + bar5.Text;
}

if (foo6.Text.Length != 0 & bar6.Text.Length != 0)
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo6.Text + " / " + bar6.Text;

if (foo7.Text.Length != 0 & bar7.Text.Length != 0)
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo7.Text + " / " + bar7.Text;
}

if (foo8.Text.Length != 0 & bar8.Text.Length != 0)
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo8.Text + " / " + bar8.Text;
}

if (foo9.Text.Length != 0 & bar9.Text.Length != 0)
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo9.Text + " / " + bar9.Text;
}

if (foo10.Text.Length != 0 & bar10.Text.Length != 0)
{
    output.Text += myStrings[i] + " / " + foo10.Text + " / " + bar10.Text;
}
share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I would put the repeated elements in arrays and then loop over them.

TextBox[] foos = new TextBox[] { foo1, foo2, foo3, /* etc */ };
TextBox[] bars = new TextBox[] { bar1, bar2, bar3, /* etc */ };

for (int i = 0; i <= 10; i++)
    if (foos[i].Text.Length != 0 && bars[i].Text.Length != 0)
        output.Text += myStrings[i] + "/" + foos[i].Text + bars[i].Text;

Of course, if the elements are really named sequentially you can fill the arrays by looking up the controls from the form's Controls collection, with the name "foo" + number.ToString().

share|improve this answer
    
This is a very nice solution! Also, the elements are named in sequence, so it makes it evey easier. Thank you! –  BeefTurkey Feb 12 '09 at 15:57
1  
As a general rule, I don't like this approach because of the implicit, non-obvious association between foos and bars. I suggest making the association explicit via a FooBar class and creating a List<FooBar> for subsequent use. –  Greg D Feb 12 '09 at 16:03
add comment

I would just loop over the Controls collection on which these TextBoxes reside, then filter on TextBox only and do you checks and concat.

I also strongly advice to use a StringBuilder instead of +=.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for StringBuilder. The string concatination in the question would be the major innefficiency here, and to the extent at which it appears to be used, it could even be noticable by the user. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Feb 12 '09 at 15:57
    
Yes, you're probably right about StringBuilder. Currently, it actually takes many seconds before all strings are generated. Thanks for the advice! –  BeefTurkey Feb 12 '09 at 16:08
    
Thanks for the heads up, good luck! –  Gerrie Schenck Feb 12 '09 at 20:52
add comment

There are a lot of ways to refactor this. The method you choose will depend on your particular scenario and needs.

  1. Make a function that takes a foo and a bar as a parameter and returns the string, then aggregate that string in a string builder
  2. Put the foos and bars into collections and loop over those collections. In this scenario, arrays would be useful and provide a way to mutually index the arrays.
  3. Take item 2 one step further and create a new class FooBar that holds a foo and a bar together. This way you can create a collection of FooBars and you don't have an implicit association between them anymore, now it's explicit and codified.
  4. Take item 3 one step further and recognize that you're aggregating a string. If you're in a recent version of c#, take advantage of your Map/Reduce in LINQ (.Select().Aggregate()) to transform your FooBars into their corresponding strings, and then to aggregate the strings into output.

This is all just the stuff off the top of my head. If you work at it more, I'm sure you can do even better. :)

(If this is homework, please add a homework tag.)

EDIT:

I can't help but wonder about the design of the UI in general based upon your comment in another post stating that it takes "many seconds" to concatenate the strings together. 10 strings is a pretty trivial amount of time on its own, but this suggests that your outer loop (that's generating i) is fairly long running.

If you're in a position where you have the freedom to make such decisions, are you certain that your UI is actually good for the task at hand? A large collection of pairs of text boxes is a difficult user interface in general. Perhaps a ListView would be more appropriate. It would implicitly contain a collection, so you wouldn't have to deal with this "ten text boxes" silliness and will be an easier UI for your users to follow in general.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you might be on to something regarding ListView. In fact, I'm going to re-code to implement a ListView element instead of a fixed set of textboxes. Thanks for the tip. –  BeefTurkey Feb 13 '09 at 9:09
add comment

Write a function which accepts foo & bar types. Pass all foo1 & bar1 to foo10 and bar10 to the function to get the values. You can also create array of foo and bar and you can loop and call the method to get the string.

share|improve this answer
add comment
 foreach (Control ctrl in Page.Controls) {
      if (ctrl is TextBox) {
          if (ctrl.Text.Length != 0) {
              output.Text += myStrings[i] + "/" + ctrl.Text;
           }
      }
 }

Untested , but should work. With this your textboxes could be named anything.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Could you make foo1-foo10 into an array, foo[10], and the same for bar? That would allow you to express this as a simple loop.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Would it be feasible to make a WebControl that has textboxes called foo and bar, and that has a function like:

if (foo.Text.Length != 0 & bar.Text.Length != 0)
    return myStrings[i] + " / " + foo.Text + " / " + bar.Text;
else
    return string.Empty;

Put ten of those on your page, then use:

output.Text = myControl1.FooBar + myControl2.FooBar + myControl3.FooBar + ...

(Still a bit messy, but not quite so repetitive.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.