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I have a small code example I want to include in the Javadoc comment for a method.

/**
 * -- ex: looping through List of Map objects --
 * <code>
 * for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
 *      Map map = (Map)list.get(i);
 *      System.out.println(map.get("wordID"));
 *      System.out.println(map.get("word"));
 * }
 * </code>
 * 
 * @param query - select statement
 * @return List of Map objects
 */

The problem is the code example shows up in the Javadoc with no line breaks making it hard to read.

-- ex: looping through List of Map objects -- for (int i = 0; i list.size(); i++) { Map map = (Map)list.get(i); System.out.println(map.get("wordID")); System.out.println(map.get("word")); } 
Parameters
query - - select statement 
Returns:
List of Map objects

I guess I am wrong in assuming the code tag would handle line breaks. What is the best way to format code examples in Javadoc comments ?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 277 down vote accepted

In addition to the already mentioned <pre> tags, you should also use the @code JavaDoc annotation, which will make life much easier when it comes to HTML entities issues (in particular with Generics), e.g.:

* <pre>
* {@code
* Set<String> s;
* System.out.println(s);
* }
* </pre>

Will give correct HTML output:

Set<String> s;
System.out.println(s);

While omitting the @code block (or using a <code> tag) will result in HTML like this:

Set s;
System.out.println(s);
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3  
{@code } will do the <pre/> for you, IIRC. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 12 '09 at 16:36
29  
I would have thought so too, but unfortunately it doesn't, you still need to add the <pre> tag to get line breaks. –  Fabian Steeg Feb 12 '09 at 16:38
4  
Unfortunately, it seems when you hit ctrl+shift+F (Format code in Eclipse), Eclipse messes up the {@code} tag and replaces it with {&#064;code ... –  jpdaigle May 13 '10 at 14:54
2  
@jpdaigle I just tried this in Eclipse Galileo and Helios and the formatter does not replace anything for me (on Mac OS, but I have never seen the formatter do anything like that on other platforms either). –  Fabian Steeg May 13 '10 at 22:40
14  
Another unfortunate, if you have blocks in your example code using curly braces "{}", the first closing brace will terminate the @code block. One way around it is to use (wait for it...) html entities for the braces. I don't see a compelling argument for <pre> tags for code with blocks. –  Ed Griebel Jan 27 '11 at 16:12

I had a really tough time with including a specific code example in a javadoc comment. I'd like to share this one.
Please note the following:

  • usage of old <code> - tag to prevent the curly brackets from being interpreted
  • usage of "new" {@code ...} - tag to get the generics included in the output
  • escaping of the @ sign in @Override via "{@literal @}Override" because javadoc generator "tilts" there due to the fact that the @ goes directly after an opening curly bracket

javadoc code:

/** this methods adds a specific translator from one type to another type. `
  * i.e.
  * <pre>
  * <code>new BeanTranslator.Builder()
  *   .translate(
  *     new Translator{@code <String, Integer>}(String.class, Integer.class){
  *       {@literal @}Override
  *       public Integer translate(String instance) {
  *         return Integer.valueOf(instance);
  *       }})
  *   .build();
  * </code>
  * </pre>
  * @param translator
  */

gets printed as

new BeanTranslator.Builder()
  .translate(
    new Translator<String, Integer>(String.class, Integer.class){
      @Override
      public Integer translate(String instance) {
        return Integer.valueOf(instance);
      }})
  .build();
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1  
+1 for this solution for IntelliJ IDEA –  MartinSVK Dec 3 '13 at 16:22

The java source has lots of good examples for this. Here's an example from the head of "String.java":

....
 * is equivalent to:
 * <p><blockquote><pre>
 *     char data[] = {'a', 'b', 'c'};
 *     String str = new String(data);
 * </pre></blockquote><p>
 * Here are some more examples of how strings can be used:
 * <p><blockquote><pre>
 *     System.out.println("abc");
 *     String cde = "cde";
 *     System.out.println("abc" + cde);
 *     String c = "abc".substring(2,3);
 *     String d = cde.substring(1, 2);
 * </pre></blockquote>
...
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4  
In summary, <pre><blockquote>...</blockquote></pre> –  Jin Kwon Aug 21 '13 at 5:45
    
Rather <p><blockquote><pre> </pre></blockquote></p> –  masterxilo Jun 13 at 8:28

Enclose your multiline code with <pre></pre> tags.

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You need the <pre></pre> tags for the line breaks, and the {@code ... } inside them for generics. But then it's not allowed to place the opening brace on the same line as the <generic> tag, because then everything will be displayed on 1 line again.

Displays on one line:

* ..
* <pre>
* {@code
* public List<Object> getObjects() {
*    return objects;
* }
* </pre>
* ..

Displays with line breaks:

* ..
* <pre>
* {@code
* public List<Object> getObjects() 
* {
*    return objects;
* }
* </pre>
* ..

Another weird thing is when you paste the closing brace of {@code, it gets displayed:

* ..
* <pre>
* {@code
*   public List<Object> getObjects() 
*   {
*     return objects;
*   }
* }
* </pre>
* ..

Output:

public List<Object> getObjects() 
{
   return objects;
}
}
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1  
Welcome on Stack Overflow. To format code in posts, you can either prefix it (on a separate paragraph) by four spaces, or surround them by backticks (`` ... ``). You don't need <code> and <pre> tags. I edited your answer in this mind. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 5 '11 at 3:24

There is a significant difference between <blockquote><pre>... and <pre>{@code.... The former will omit the type declarations in generics but the latter will keep it.

E.g.: List<MyClass> myObject = null; displays as List myObject = null; with the firts and as List<MyClass> myObject = null; with the second

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I was able to generate good looking HTML files with the following snip-it shown in Code 1.

 * <pre>
 * {@code
 * A-->B
 *  \
 *   C-->D
 *    \   \
 *     G   E-->F
 * }
 *</pre>

(Code 1)

Code 1 turned into the generated javadoc HTML page in Fig 1, as expected.

A-->B
 \
  C-->D
   \   \
    G   E-->F

(Fig. 1)

However, in NetBeans 7.2, if you hit Alt+Shift+F (to reformat the current file), Code 1 turns in to Code 2.

 * <
 * pre>
 * {@code
 * A-->B
 *  \
 *   C-->D
 *    \   \
 *     G   E-->F
 * }
 * </pre>

(Code 2)

where the first <pre> is now broken onto two lines. Code 2 produces generated javadoc HTML file as shown in Fig 2.

< pre> A-->B \ C-->D \ \ G E-->F

(Fig 2)

Steve B's suggestion (Code 3) seems to give the best results and remains formatted as expected even after hitting Alt+Shift+F.

*<p><blockquote><pre>         
* A-->B
*  \
*   C-->D
*    \   \
*     G   E-->F
* </pre></blockquote>

(Code 3)

Use of Code 3 produces the same javadoc HTML output as shown in Fig 1.

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Try replacing "code" with "pre". The pre tag in HTML marks the text as preformatted and all linefeeds and spaces will appear exactly as you type them.

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Using Java SE 1.6, it looks like all UPPERCASE PRE identifiers is the best way to do this in Javadoc:

/**
 * <PRE>
 * insert code as you would anywhere else
 * </PRE>
 */

is the simplest way to do this.

An Example from a javadoc I got from a java.awt.Event method:

/**
 * <PRE>
 *    int onmask = SHIFT_DOWN_MASK | BUTTON1_DOWN_MASK;
 *    int offmask = CTRL_DOWN_MASK;
 *    if ((event.getModifiersEx() & (onmask | offmask)) == onmask) {
 *        ...
 *    }
 * </PRE>
 */

This produces output that looks exactly like the regular code, with the regular code spacings and new lines intact.

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2  
This doesn't add anything to the existing answers. –  madth3 Oct 20 '12 at 0:18
    
madth3, you're right. I thought I had seen a difference when using lower vs. UPPERCASE pre modifiers, but on second look, it doesn't seem like it. It might also have something to do with how it appeared on this webpage vs. how it appears in javadoc. –  Eugene_CD-adapco Nov 8 '12 at 23:43
    
case sensitive in the html tag? –  Jasonw Dec 5 '12 at 7:37
/**
 * <blockquote><pre>
 * {@code
 * public Foo(final Class<?> klass) {
 *     super();
 *     this.klass = klass;
 * }
 * }
 * </pre></blockquote>
 **/
  • <pre/> is required for preserving lines.
  • {@code must has its own line
  • <blockquote/> is just for indentation.
<blockquote><pre>
<code>public Foo(final Class&lt;?&gt; klass) {
    super();
    this.klass = klass;
}
</code>
</pre></blockquote>
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I enclose my example code with <pre class="brush: java"></pre> tags and use SyntaxHighlighter for published javadocs. It doesn't hurt IDE and makes published code examples beautiful.

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