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there has been many previous questions about redirecting stdout/stderr to a file. is there a way to redirect stdout/stderr to a string?

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3 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Yes, you can redirect it to an std::stringstream:

std::stringstream buffer;
std::streambuf * old = std::cout.rdbuf(buffer.rdbuf());

std::cout << "Bla" << std::endl;

std::string text = buffer.str(); // text will now contain "Bla\n"

You can use a simple guard class to make sure the buffer is always reset:

struct cout_redirect {
    cout_redirect( std::streambuf * new_buffer ) 
        : old( std::cout.rdbuf( new_buffer ) )
    { }

    ~cout_redirect( ) {
        std::cout.rdbuf( old );
    }

private:
    std::streambuf * old;
};
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that is for stdout. what about stderr?? do i have to redirect cerr? –  Prasanth Madhavan Mar 24 '11 at 12:55
    
Yes, you just do the same, but with std::cerr. –  Björn Pollex Mar 24 '11 at 12:56
    
Sorry, my C (or C++ for that matter) is a bit rusty, but that doesn't help when other parts of the application do fprintf(stderr, ...) or fprintf(stdout, ...) or printf(), doesn't it? Also, it doesn't help with write(1, ...) or write(2, ...), even though that wasn't asked :-) –  Christian.K Mar 24 '11 at 14:09
2  
@Christian: No, it doesn't. This solution only works with C++ iostreams. –  Björn Pollex Mar 24 '11 at 14:11
1  
@MinimusHeximus: That is the point - the output is redirected into a string, not to the screen. To print to the screen again, you have to restore the original buffer to cout. –  Björn Pollex Oct 25 '13 at 7:23
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You can use this class:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string>

class StdCapture
{
public:
    StdCapture(): m_capturing(false), m_init(false), m_oldStdOut(0), m_oldStdErr(0)
    {
        m_pipe[READ] = 0;
        m_pipe[WRITE] = 0;
        if (_pipe(m_pipe, 65536, O_BINARY) == -1)
            return;
        m_oldStdOut = dup(fileno(stdout));
        m_oldStdErr = dup(fileno(stderr));
        if (m_oldStdOut == -1 || m_oldStdErr == -1)
            return;

        m_init = true;
    }

    ~StdCapture()
    {
        if (m_capturing)
        {
            EndCapture();
        }
        if (m_oldStdOut > 0)
            close(m_oldStdOut);
        if (m_oldStdErr > 0)
            close(m_oldStdErr);
        if (m_pipe[READ] > 0)
            close(m_pipe[READ]);
        if (m_pipe[WRITE] > 0)
            close(m_pipe[WRITE]);
    }


    void BeginCapture()
    {
        if (!m_init)
            return;
        if (m_capturing)
            EndCapture();
        fflush(stdout);
        fflush(stderr);
        dup2(m_pipe[WRITE], fileno(stdout));
        dup2(m_pipe[WRITE], fileno(stderr));
        m_capturing = true;
    }

    bool EndCapture()
    {
        if (!m_init)
            return false;
        if (!m_capturing)
            return false;
        fflush(stdout);
        fflush(stderr);
        dup2(m_oldStdOut, fileno(stdout));
        dup2(m_oldStdErr, fileno(stderr));
        m_captured.clear();

        std::string buf;
        const int bufSize = 1024;
        buf.resize(bufSize);
        int bytesRead = 0;
        if (!eof(m_pipe[READ]))
        {
            bytesRead = read(m_pipe[READ], &(*buf.begin()), bufSize);
        }
        while(bytesRead == bufSize)
        {
            m_captured += buf;
            bytesRead = 0;
            if (!eof(m_pipe[READ]))
            {
                bytesRead = read(m_pipe[READ], &(*buf.begin()), bufSize);
            }
        }
        if (bytesRead > 0)
        {
            buf.resize(bytesRead);
            m_captured += buf;
        }
        return true;
    }

    std::string GetCapture() const
    {
        std::string::size_type idx = m_captured.find_last_not_of("\r\n");
        if (idx == std::string::npos)
        {
            return m_captured;
        }
        else
        {
            return m_captured.substr(0, idx+1);
        }
    }

private:
    enum PIPES { READ, WRITE };
    int m_pipe[2];
    int m_oldStdOut;
    int m_oldStdErr;
    bool m_capturing;
    bool m_init;
    std::string m_captured;
};

call BeginCapture() when you need to start capture
call EndCapture() when you need to stop capture
call GetCapture() to retrieve captured output

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I am not too familiar with pipes, but how large is a pipe's buffer in the kernel? In other words, how many bytes can you pass to write() w/o calling read() before write() blocks? –  Arkadiy Mar 24 '11 at 12:56
1  
+1 for a reallY complicated solution to a trivial problem! :) –  Nim Mar 24 '11 at 12:59
    
@Nim: I used this class by myself, because Borland Builder 4 (where I needed such redirect) had fatal bug in std::stringstream. For normal compilers solution of Space_C0wb0y is more appropriate :) –  rmflow Mar 24 '11 at 15:51
3  
+1 for a solution that handles all stdout/stderr (unlike the accepted solution which only does cout/cerr). –  zpasternack Jun 5 '11 at 23:02
    
O_BINARY and some other identifiers are unkownn to my compiler. –  Minimus Heximus Sep 5 '13 at 9:38
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Since your question is tagged C as well as C++, it seems appropriate to mention that although you cannot associate a string to a FILE * in standard C, there are several non-standard libraries that allow that. glibc is almost standard, so you may be perfectly happy using fmemopen() See http://www.gnu.org/s/libc/manual/html_mono/libc.html#String-Streams

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however, there's no fmemreopen()... –  Christoph Mar 24 '11 at 17:03
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