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I've been wrestling with this one for a while now...

I have a subclassed View that pops up the keyboard when it receives a 'touch up' in onTouchEvent. It shows this by requesting focus, retrieving the InputMethodManager, and then calling showSoftInput.

Now I need to figure out how to capture the tapped letters of the soft keyboard, as they are pressed. I am currently only getting a response when the Next/Done button is pressed on the soft keyboard.

Here is my class:

public class BigGrid extends View {

    private static final String TAG = "BigGrid";

    public BigGrid(Context context) {
        super(context);
        setFocusableInTouchMode(true); // allows the keyboard to pop up on
                                       // touch down

        setOnKeyListener(new OnKeyListener() {
            public boolean onKey(View v, int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
                Log.d(TAG, "onKeyListener");
                if (event.getAction() == KeyEvent.ACTION_DOWN) {
                    // Perform action on key press
                    Log.d(TAG, "ACTION_DOWN");
                    return true;
                }
                return false;
            }
        });
    }

    @Override
    public boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent event) {
        super.onTouchEvent(event);
        Log.d(TAG, "onTOUCH");
        if (event.getAction() == MotionEvent.ACTION_UP) {

            // show the keyboard so we can enter text
            InputMethodManager imm = (InputMethodManager) getContext()
                    .getSystemService(Context.INPUT_METHOD_SERVICE);
            imm.showSoftInput(this, InputMethodManager.SHOW_FORCED);
        }
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public InputConnection onCreateInputConnection(EditorInfo outAttrs) {
        Log.d(TAG, "onCreateInputConnection");

        BaseInputConnection fic = new BaseInputConnection(this, true);
        outAttrs.actionLabel = null;
        outAttrs.inputType = InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT;
        outAttrs.imeOptions = EditorInfo.IME_ACTION_NEXT;
        return fic;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean onCheckIsTextEditor() {
        Log.d(TAG, "onCheckIsTextEditor");
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public void onDraw(Canvas canvas) {
        super.onDraw(canvas);

        canvas.drawColor(R.color.grid_bg);
        // .
        // .
        // alot more drawing code...
        // .
    }
}

The keyboard shows, but my onKeyListener only fires when I press the 'Next' button on the keyboard. I need which character is tapped, so that I can display it in my onDraw() method.

Any help is very appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
wouldn't it better to extend TextView? –  pawelzieba Mar 24 '11 at 15:53
    
Extending TextView doesn't give me any more control over listening for key events than what I already have (at least not that I am aware of), but what it does is some specific styling and text drawing that I would just have to override and get rid of. That is why I chose to subclass View instead. –  rich.e Mar 27 '11 at 5:22

3 Answers 3

It is actually possible to handle the key events yourself without deriving your view from TextView.

To do this, just modify your original code as follows:

1) Replace the following line in onCreateInputConnection():

outAttrs.inputType = InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT;

with this one:

outAttrs.inputType = InputType.TYPE_NULL;

Per the documentation for InputType.TYPE_NULL: "This should be interpreted to mean that the target input connection is not rich, it can not process and show things like candidate text nor retrieve the current text, so the input method will need to run in a limited 'generate key events' mode."

2) Replace the following line in the same method:

BaseInputConnection fic = new BaseInputConnection(this, true);

with this one:

BaseInputConnection fic = new BaseInputConnection(this, false);

The false second argument puts the BaseInputConnection into "dummy" mode, which is also required in order for the raw key events to be sent to your view. In the BaseInputConnection code, you can find several comments such as the following: "only if dummy mode, a key event is sent for the new text and the current editable buffer cleared."

I have used this approach to have the soft keyboard send raw events to a view of mine that is derived from LinearLayout (i.e., a view not derived from TextView), and can confirm that it works.

Of course, if you didn't need to set the IME_ACTION_DONE imeOptions value to show a Done button on the keyboard, then you could just remove the onCreateInputConnection() and onCheckIsTextEditor() overrides entirely, and raw events would then be sent to your view by default, since no input connection capable of more sophisticated processing would have been defined.

But unfortunately, there does not seem to be a simple way to configure the EditorInfo attributes without overriding these methods and providing a BaseInputConnection object, and once you have done that you will have to dumb down the processing performed by that object as described above if you want to once again receive the raw key events.

WARNING: Two bugs were introduced in certain recent versions of the default LatinIME keyboard that ships with Android (Google Keyboard) that can impact keyboard event processing (as described above) when that keyboard is in use. I've devised some workarounds on the app side, with sample code, that appear to get around these problems. To view these workarounds, see the following answer:

Android - cannot capture backspace/delete press in soft. keyboard

share|improve this answer
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Turns out that I did in fact need to subclass TextView and the use addTextChangedListener() to add my own implementation of TextWatcher in order to listen to soft key events. I couldn't find a way to do this with a plain old View.

One other thing, for those who will try this technique; TextView is not able to edit text by default, so if you want to make your implementation editable (instead of subclassing EditText, which I didn't want to to do), you must also make a custom InputConnection, something like the following:

 /**
 * MyInputConnection
 * BaseInputConnection configured to be editable
 */
class MyInputConnection extends BaseInputConnection {
    private SpannableStringBuilder _editable;
    TextView _textView;

    public MyInputConnection(View targetView, boolean fullEditor) {
        super(targetView, fullEditor);
        _textView = (TextView) targetView;
    }

    public Editable getEditable() {
        if (_editable == null) {
            _editable = (SpannableStringBuilder) Editable.Factory.getInstance()
            .newEditable("Placeholder");
        }
        return _editable;
    }

    public boolean commitText(CharSequence text, int newCursorPosition) {
        _editable.append(text);
        _textView.setText(text);
        return true;
    }
}

Then you override onCheckisTextEditor and onCreateInputConnection with something like the following:

 @Override
 public InputConnection onCreateInputConnection(EditorInfo outAttrs) {
     outAttrs.actionLabel = null;
     outAttrs.label = "Test text";
     outAttrs.inputType = InputType.TYPE_TEXT_FLAG_NO_SUGGESTIONS;
     outAttrs.imeOptions = EditorInfo.IME_ACTION_DONE;

     return new MyInputConnection(this, true);
 }

 @Override
 public boolean onCheckIsTextEditor() {
     return true;
 }

After this, you should have a View that can listen to the soft keyboard and you can do whatever you want with the key input values.

share|improve this answer
    
While this may work in practice for most situations, I've recently learned (from one of the LatinIME developers) that a given IME can choose to add text to the Editable by invoking some of the other methods besides commitText(). The IME could use, for example, commitCompletion(), which will extend the current composing text. So, you might want to look into overriding some additional methods, although your general approach is probably pretty good. –  Carl Dec 13 '13 at 13:51

My understanding is that your onKeyListener is only going to get hardware keyboard key events.

You will get access to all input key events if you override boolean View.onKeyPreIme(int keyCode, KeyEvent event)

This way you can elect to handle the key event action [ DOWN | MULTIPLE | UP ] and return true, or allow the normal key processing to deal with it (return super.onKeyPreIme())

share|improve this answer
1  
I still need to try out onKeyPreIme, it looks like it may give me what I was looking for. But, using a TextWatcher definitely works. –  rich.e Jun 28 '11 at 8:25
    
Hey can you give me the code for how to use onKeyPreIme , Thanks in advance –  TRonZ Jul 20 '12 at 12:52

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