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(I am trying to learn WPF using tutorials and documentation, and trying to develop a user interface for my backend-complete application while I do say. I've heard people say that the learning curve is quite steep. But sometimes I wonder whether what I'm trying to do is actually something that's hard to do in WPF, or if it's simple but I'm thinking in wrong terms, or if it's neither, it's quite simple but I just happen not to know how.)

Here's my current question. I wanted clicking that clicking some part of my UI will bring up a 'popup' where the user can enter more information. I would like a 'lightbox-style' popup, i.e. the popup is modal to the page, it darkens the rest of the page to become the center of attention, etc. These are seen commonly on Web sites.

A bit of searching led me to the WPF Popup control. I added it, put my content in, set the IsOpen property to True, and -- presto! A popup. Then I added an invisible Rectangle that covers my whole window, and set it to Visible as well when I want my popup to open. Great!

So now I wanted to do this dynamically, because sometimes I will be loading a record which will sometimes have a need to open another control (a UserControl) in a popup to edit its information. So I made myself a method called OpenPopup. But I can't seem to find a way to write this method using WPF. In Windows Forms I'd have written: (I use VB.NET)

Sub ShowPopup (form as Form, ctrl as Control)
    'Create 'rect' as new dark rectangle control
    'Z-order it to the top
    'form.Controls.Add 'rect'
    'form.Controls.Add ctrl
    'Z-order 'ctrl' to the top
    'Center 'ctrl'
    'Set focus to it
End Sub

But with WPF I run into problems:

1) I can't add it to the WPF window, because it already has a child.

2) If that child is a Canvas, that's not too bad. I can detect that, and add it to the Canvas. I have to find some way to set its Left, Top etc. properties and Width and Height, since those do not seem to be properties of the Rectangle control but rather extended by the Canvas object -- in XAML they're called Cavnas.Top etc. but Intellisense is not showing them when I try to use it in code.

3) But if it's a StackPanel? Then my rectangle will just be stacked below the other controls! And not covering them! Is there a way around this?

4) And if the window contains only one control and no container control at all?

5) I think there were more problems I ran into. But let's start with these.

Thanks in advance for your help.

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1 Answer 1

1) I can't add it to the WPF window, because it already has a child.

Ah, the evils of codebehind. The solution is not to add it to the visual tree, it is to place it in the visual tree, ready and waiting to pounce, but hide it from the user's view.

Here's a sample you can drop in Kaxaml that demonstrates the point. Set the Lightbox Grid's Visibility to Hidden to access the hidden content.

<Page xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
    <Grid>
        <Viewbox>
            <TextBox Text="SIMULATING CONTENT" />
        </Viewbox>
        <Grid x:Name="Lightbox" Visibility="Visible">
            <Rectangle Fill="Black" Opacity=".5"/>
            <Border
                Margin="100"
                Background="white"
                BorderBrush="CornflowerBlue"
                BorderThickness="4"
                CornerRadius="20">
                <Viewbox Margin="25">
                    <TextBox Text="SIMULATING LIGHTBOX"/>
                </Viewbox>
            </Border>
        </Grid>
    </Grid>
</Page>

2) (snip) Intellisense is not showing them when I try to use it in code.

Canvas.Top etal are Attached Properties. Attached Properties are extremely convenient and easy to use in XAML, but they are very confusing and hard to use from code. Another reason why codebehind is evil.

3) But if it's a StackPanel? Then my rectangle will just be stacked below the other controls! And not covering them! Is there a way around this?

I redirect you back to 1. There are also many other container controls in WPF. You should investigate them and observe how they control layout. For instance, my use of the Grid was not to make use of its ability to block off sections of UI for controls, but for its ability to layer controls ontop of each other and to stretch them out to their maximum available size for the available space (the viewboxes are just there to zoom the controls instead of stretch them).

4) And if the window contains only one control and no container control at all?

The root of a window would almost always be a container control. But you control that, so if you needed to add controls to the visual tree at runtime you could easily ensure the child of the window is a container control you could deal with.

5) I think there were more problems I ran into. But let's start with these.

No kidding. My number one suggestion for people in your situation is to drop what you're doing and learn about MVVM. The Model-View-ViewModel is a very simple way to code WPF applications that takes advantage of many of the features of WPF--databinding, templating, commands, etc. It allows you to code your logic not in codebehind (RETCH) but in easy to create and test classes.

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2  
+1, especially for the last paragraph. OP's approach to learning WPF seems reasonable - it's the same approach I took myself - but it's a really good way to spend a couple of frustrating months during which you learn very little about WPF. –  Robert Rossney Mar 24 '11 at 16:09
    
Thanks everybody! @Will, re #1: the premise of my question was, is it possible to do this globally to re-use on any window without adding XAML or anything to it. Is that not an advantage? Re: MVVM and @Robert, thanks for the tip. I agree and I've researched MVVM and I actually like it a lot; I'm definitely going to continue down that path. Although you would agree that it would not solve the problem posted here. –  Fred Mar 27 '11 at 1:33
    
@user well, that suggests your overlay be encapsulated in a user control. Creating an actual control that interacts with the UI via code is exponentially more complicated... –  Will Mar 27 '11 at 3:11

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