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I have a recursive function from a C book as follows:

void print(int a[], int n)
{   if (n<=0)  return ;
     printf("%d\n", a[0]);
     print(&a[1], n-1);
}

I have run and this function prints all the element of the specified array. But I really do not understand how this function works so that I can print all elements of an array. Can anyone give me a clear explanation, please?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 5 down vote accepted

&a[1] is the address of the second element of the array, which is effectively the address of the portion of the array after the first element. So after printing the first element of the parameter array,

print(&a[1], n-1);

passes itself the remaining portion of the array, decreasing the length by one as well.

For example, if you call print with the array {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and n == 5, the chain of events and calls is the following:

  1. print the first element (1)
  2. call itself with the remaining portion of the array, i.e. {2, 3, 4, 5} and n == 4
    1. print the first element (2)
    2. call itself with the remaining portion of the array, i.e. {3, 4, 5} and n == 3
      1. print the first element (3)
      2. call itself with the remaining portion of the array, i.e. {4, 5} and n == 2
        1. print the first element (4)
        2. call itself with the remaining portion of the array, i.e. {5} and n == 1
          1. print the first element (5)
          2. call itself with the remaining portion of the array, i.e. {} and n == 0
            1. n<=0 -> return
          3. return
        3. return
      3. return
    3. return
  3. return
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4  
It may be easier to understand if you substitute &a[1] with a+1 - they mean the same thing. –  Arkadiy Mar 24 '11 at 14:30

This function takes as arguments the remaining part of the array and how many elements it contains. Every time you print the first element and then call recursively of the remaining part. Here is an example:

array: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; N = 6
array: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; N = 5
array: 3, 4, 5, 6; N = 4
array: 4, 5, 6; N = 3
array: 5, 6; N = 2
array: 6; N = 1
array: ; N = 0 return;
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Arrays are basically pointers to the start of the first element, so you code is essentially this:

void print(int *a, int n)
{   if (n<=0)  return ;
     printf("%d\n", *a);
     print(a+1, n-1);
}

The recursive call is passing in a pointer to the next item in the array and decreasing the count, which is your used in your recursive termination condition.

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So it does the following:

  1. Check if there are any elements in the array, if not, just return.
  2. Print the first element in the array since we know we have atleast one.
  3. Calls itself again pointing to the 2nd element in the array, and subtracting 1 from the size, thus starting at #1 again.
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A good way to understand recursion IMHO is to run the code in a debugger, and watch the call stack and variables.

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  • How do you print a zero-sized array? Easy: you don't
    That's your if (n<=0) return;

  • How do you print an array with 1 element? Easy: just print the element and remove it from the array and print the resulting zero-sized array as before
    That's your printf("%d\n", a[0]);

  • How do you print an array with 2 elements? Easy: print the first element and remove it from the array and print the resulting one-sized array as before
    That's your print(&a[1], n-1);


  • How do you print an array with N elements?
    Easy: print the first element, remove it from the array, and print the resulting smaller array
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If n is zero (or less), it does nothing, so recursion stops. If n > 0, then it prints a[0] and calls itself recursively with n-1 for n (so that goes to 0 as the recursion proceeds) and &a[1] for a, i.e. it increments the pointer a in each recursive call. Remember that an array argument in C is syntactic sugar for a pointer argument.

So, the code you posted is equivalent to:

void print(int *a, int n)
{
    if (n > 0) {
        printf("%d\n", *a);
        print(a+1, n-1);
    }
}
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If you can verify to yourself that the following algorithm works to print an array, you should be able to understand why the C code works, since it's a direct translation.

To print n elements of an array:

  • If you're asked to print no elements, just stop.
  • Otherwise:
    • Print the first element, and then
    • Print n-1 elements of the rest of the array (using this same recipe).
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it is equivalent to a loop:

int i ;
for (i = 0 ; i< n ; i++) { 
printf("%d\n",a[i]);
}

why? well, the recursion always looks at the first element and prints it, and them advances to the next element by looking at the array from the 2nd element (which will now be the 'first', in the next iteration).
your stop condition is when no more elements are left - i.e. an array of length 0.

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The function accepts an array and the length of the array.

if(n<=0) return;

If the length of the array is <=0 the function returns.

printf("%d\n", a[0]);

The first element of the array, element 0 is printed.

print(&a[1], n-1);

&a[1] gets a pointer to the first element of the array. Arrays and pointers are usable interchangably so when this is passed to the function the function can treat it as a new array, starting from the second element of the previous array, and with a length one less.

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Each call to print do this :

  1. print the n-th element of the array a and decrement the remaining elements (n) count to print.(Look at n like it means: how many elements remain to print).
  2. Call it self decrementing (n - 1 : one less element to print) passing a pointer to the second element of the array (&a[1]) because the first element (a[0])has already be printed.

What exactly don't you understand?

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