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I'm trying to write a wrapper to help our customers restore a SQL Server database. By default SQL Server runs as user Network Service which has very limited permissions. Our customers are sometimes confused that they can't just point to a backup file in any location and restore it.

I want to copy the file from the location they choose to a temp location that SQL Server can access but I'm having a hard time finding a location. I can't just call Path.GetTempPath() because that gives me the user's temp which SQL Server can't access.

Is there a folder I can retrieve that will always work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The temp folder for the Network Service account is located here:

%Windir%\ServiceProfiles\NetworkService\AppData\Local\Temp

On Windows XP/2003 the network service profile is located in the general user profile directory. On a German machine it is here:

C:\Dokumente und Einstellungen\NetworkService\Lokale Einstellungen\Temp

On an English computer it would be here:

C:\Documents and Settings\NetworkService\Local Settings\Temp

You can find the path to the profile on all Windows versions by querying this registry value:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList\S-1-5-20\ProfileImagePath

That does not give you the localized name of "Local Settings" on XP/2003, though.

By default, Administrators can write to the network service profile. Using it's temp folder for your purpose should be perfectly OK.

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That looks like what I'm after. I'll try that. –  Kevin Gale Mar 24 '11 at 14:48
    
Problem, That path doesn't work on Windows XP. –  Kevin Gale Mar 24 '11 at 15:01
    
Updated my answer to include XP, too. –  Helge Klein Mar 24 '11 at 16:29

Why not just give NETWORK_SERVICE permission to a specific folder and tell the users to place the backup files there?

Or just run:

BACKUP DATABASE [master] TO DISK='master.bak'
GO

from SSMS and see where the file gets written to.

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1  
I don't want to have to customize each customers system by changing permissions. System Admins don't like us telling them to add permissions to folders and I rather not do that unless I have no other choice. –  Kevin Gale Mar 24 '11 at 14:50

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