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I ship a public header that users compile against to utilize classes contained within. I need to fix an issue in the shared library that implements one of these public classes and have a requirement that existing users need not recompile their libraries when installing a patch. The fix requires a bool member to be able to hold more information than false,true. The class looks like

class PublicAPI{
...
public:
  bool getSync();
  void setSync(bool sync);
...
private
  bool sync_;
...
};

I'd like to change bool sync_; to unsigned char sync_;:

class PublicAPI{
...
public:
  bool getSync();
  void setSync(bool sync);
...
private
  unsigned char sync_;
...
};

Note that the getters and setters won't and I don't think can change. They will be ok, since the user will not need to be aware of the additional values sync_ contains and I will handle retaining my values internally. Obviously this is an ugly hack, but I think technically it's ok because the size of the class won't change.

My concern is that a compiler on one of the platforms I ship on Linux, AIX, HPUX, Solaris, Windows will play some game with the bool type I'm not aware of and break something.

Any thoughts on how safe or dangerous this is?

share|improve this question
    
The sync_ is a private field, which means the client can't access it somewhere else, so the only problem is the size change, right? – Shuo Mar 24 '11 at 15:41
    
Exactly. The change shouldn't be outwardly visible to the user, but I can't change the size of the class and break binary compatibility to libraries compiled against the old header. Since sizeof(bool)==sizeof(unsigned char)==1 I think the size does not change, but my worry is one of the compilers does something tricky making the change binary incompatible with old libraries. Maybe this isn't a valid concern. – Jake Mar 24 '11 at 15:56
    
Even though there is no ganrentee, I think you can take sizeof(bool)>= 1 as a fact, then you can declare your member as char _sync[sizeof(bool)], I guess. – Shuo Mar 25 '11 at 8:45
1  
There's a hard guarantee that sizeof(T) >= 1 for all complete types T, including bool. A better solution would be union { bool sync_, char sync_hack }, though. This must be aligned like a bool. – MSalters Mar 25 '11 at 10:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know about GCC, but I did some similar hacks with MSVC 6 a long time ago (most of them were replacing a DWORD with a pointer). Worked just fine. Of course, as many others already wrote, sizeof(whateverYouUse) must equal sizeof(bool). That shouldn't be a problem though, since you can always use

class PublicAPI{
...
public:
  bool getSync();
  void setSync(bool sync);
...
private
  unsigned char sync_[sizeof(bool)];
...
};

And then use sync_[0] internally.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, and do yourself and your co-workers a favor and add a comment why that strange construct was introduced. And maybe also add an "improvement" task in your ticketing system to clean it up for the next release that breaks binary compatibility. – Paul Groke Mar 27 '11 at 2:47

I don't think there's a way to do what you want that's guaranteed to be safe. Some compiler might have different sizes for bool and unsigned char.

It seems pretty unlikely that this would be the case on most compilers and you can probably get away with it. Better of course is to "suggest" a recompile but allow that it may work without recompiling.

This is a perfect example where pimpl'ing your implementation would have eliminated any concern as the internal type would have been fully hidden within your library rather than expost.

share|improve this answer

The safest way would be to use a union of bool and unsigned char. When bool is larger than char, the union would be aligned like a bool, but still contain the char.

Both bool and char are POD types, so there is no big deal. All access is via the two non-inlined members (you are sure they're not inline? I.e. not defined inside the class?) which means you always access the union via the char member.

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I'm pretty sure that technically, you'd invoke undefined behaviour. However, I think that in practicality no compiler will throw on that change.

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Technically, it's undefined behavior, and in practice, it almost certainly won't work---the function names will be mangled (decorated) differently, and the linker will fail to find the function.

In most such cases, the solution is to override, with the old function forwarding to the new one, e.g.

public:
    void setSync(bool sync);
    void setSync(int sync);

, with setSync(bool sync) implemented as:

void PublicAPI::setSync(bool sync)
{
    setSync(sync ? 1 : 0);
}

Don't make the new implementation of setSync inline. (If the old one was in fact inline, you're screwed.)

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1  
That's not true- he left the public accessors with the old signature. – Puppy Mar 24 '11 at 15:59

if sizeof(bool)!=sizeof(char) and because of this the size of the class will be different. This may cause you troubles if you have a module that is compiled with an old header and have a new binary. To avoid compiling issues, just be sure you cast and should be ok.

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Is this somehow platform specific that I'm not aware of? Current language: auto; currently c++ (gdb) p sizeof(bool) $1 = 1 (gdb) p sizeof(unsigned char) $2 = 1 (gdb) – Jake Mar 24 '11 at 15:57
    
Yes, it is platform dependent. Having sizeof(bool)==sizeof(int) is not unusual. – Bo Persson Mar 24 '11 at 16:46
    
it is usual, but i'm not sure is a rule. – cprogrammer Mar 24 '11 at 16:48
    
@Bo Ah, good to know. I wasn't aware of that. Do you have any specific examples? – Jake Mar 24 '11 at 17:12

You don't need to change the header file at all, if you can bring yourself to program like this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std ;

static bool b ;
int main()
  {
  unsigned char u0 = 99 ;
  *reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&b) = u0 ;
  unsigned char u1 = *reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&b) ;
  cout << int(u1) << endl ;
  }
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