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I guess this should be an easy one cause I must be doing something wrong.

this is my code, I'm trying to do a Strategy pattern in Delphi:

unit Pattern;

interface

type

  TContext = class;

  IStrategy = interface
    function Move(c: TContext): integer;
  end;

  TStrategy1 = class(TInterfacedObject, IStrategy)
  public
    function Move(c: TContext): integer;
  end;

  TStrategy2 = class(TInterfacedObject, IStrategy)
  public
    function Move(c: TContext): integer;
  end;

  TContext = class
  const
    START = 5;
  private
    FStrategy: IStrategy;
  public
    FCounter: integer;
    constructor Create;
    function Algorithm(): integer;
    procedure SwitchStrategy();
  end;

implementation

{ TStrategy1 }

function TStrategy1.Move(c: TContext): integer;
begin
  c.FCounter := c.FCounter + 1;
  Result := c.FCounter;
end;

{ TStrategy2 }

function TStrategy2.Move(c: TContext): integer;
begin
  c.FCounter := c.FCounter - 1;
  Result := c.FCounter;
end;

{ TContext }

function TContext.Algorithm: integer;
begin
  Result := FStrategy.Move(Self)
end;

constructor TContext.Create;
begin
  FCounter := 5;
  FStrategy := TStrategy1.Create();
end;

procedure TContext.SwitchStrategy;
begin
  if FStrategy is TStrategy1 then
    FStrategy := TStrategy2.Create()
  else
    FStrategy := TStrategy1.Create();
end;

end.

And the if FStrategy is TStrategy1 then is giving me: Operator not applicable to this operand type. What am I doing wrong here cause this should work as I understand from a lot of Delphi language references?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have omitted the GUID from your interface. is can't work without it.

Edit: On second glance, it still won't work. You can't use is to test an interface reference for its implementing object typein Delphi (well, not directly, anyway). You should change your design. For example, you could either alter the interface or add another interface to return a description of the implementation.

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4  
To elaborate, is is a notational shortcut for QueryInterface, which requests an interface as identified by its IID, what Craig refers to as the GUID. Generate one by positioning the cursor on a blank line under IStrategy = interface and pressing CTRL+SHIFT+G. –  David Heffernan Mar 24 '11 at 16:17
    
@David, that's all correct, but even this won't make his code work, as the IID/GUID won't match a type reference. –  Craig Stuntz Mar 24 '11 at 16:18
2  
@Craig As of D2010, you can recover the implementing object from a Delphi interface. –  David Heffernan Mar 24 '11 at 17:19
1  
@David Yes, I understand you solution but I now think that a better example for Strategy pattern would be to have some sort of SetStrategy(s: IStrategy) method in the TContext rather than having predefined strategies in it. –  elector Mar 25 '11 at 9:10
1  
@elector I think you need to decide for yourself based on your own needs. I think you now know what your options are. I would just encourage you to take heed of the final sentence of my answer and find a solution which doesn't lead to you asking an object what type it is. –  David Heffernan Mar 25 '11 at 9:56

You could make this work by adding the IID/GUID as Craig states, and then changing SwitchStrategy to:

procedure TContext.SwitchStrategy;
begin
  if (FStrategy as TObject) is TStrategy1 then
    FStrategy := TStrategy2.Create()
  else
    FStrategy := TStrategy1.Create();
end;

This only works with more modern versions of Delphi. I think Delphi 2010 was where the ability to cast an interface to its implementing object was added.


However, I'd be inclined to avoid this solution and go for something like this:

type
  IStrategy = interface
    function Move(c: TContext): integer;
    function Switch: IStrategy;
  end;

  TStrategy1 = class(TInterfacedObject, IStrategy)
  public
    function Move(c: TContext): integer;
    function Switch: IStrategy;
  end;

  TStrategy2 = class(TInterfacedObject, IStrategy)
  public
    function Move(c: TContext): integer;
    function Switch: IStrategy;
  end;

function TStrategy1.Switch: IStrategy;
begin
  Result := TStrategy2.Create;
end;

function TStrategy2.Switch: IStrategy;
begin
  Result := TStrategy1.Create;
end;

procedure TContext.SwitchStrategy;
begin
  FStrategy := FStrategy.Switch;
end;

When you find yourself asking an object what type it is, that's usually indicative of a design weakness.

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6  
"When you find yourself asking an object what type it is, that's usually indicative of a design weakness." Words to live by. –  Nick Hodges Mar 24 '11 at 19:55
    
Thank you for this valuable tip! –  elector Mar 25 '11 at 6:35

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