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In my code I'm assigning a String to the name property of a FrameworkElement. This String is automatically generated from another part of the application and represents methods name in Java source code and therefore I want to check if it contains a valid name.

Currently I'm doing it that way:

        private string getValidName(String s)
        {
            return s.Replace("<", "").Replace(">", "").Replace("#", "").Replace("(", "").Replace(")", "").Replace(",", "").Replace(".", "").Replace("$", "").Replace(" ", "");
        }

But the problem is that I don't know which letters I have to replace. For example in this code [ and ] are missing as I found out when I was hit with an Exception.

So my question is. Is there a list of allowed symbols? And if yes how can I implement this in a reasonable way?

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@Daniel Hilgarth I'm note sure if this really can help me, since for example $ seems to be valid character in Java but I can't use it for the name property of the FrameworkElement in WPF. –  anon Mar 24 '11 at 16:32
    
Obviously, I was confused by this sentence: "represents methods name in Java source code": Java or WPF? :-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 24 '11 at 16:33
    
@Daniel Hilgarth Sorry for that. The problem is. The String that I use to set the Name Property contains Java method Names. –  anon Mar 24 '11 at 16:35
    
IMHO, the most pragmatic way would be to replace everything that is not [a-z][A-Z][0-9] with an underscore and additionally put an underscore in front. With this, you can change any arbitrary string into a valid identifier. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 24 '11 at 16:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

IMHO, the most pragmatic way would be to replace everything that is not [a-z][A-Z][0-9] with an underscore and additionally put an underscore in front. With this, you can change any arbitrary string into a valid identifier.
I know that this doesn't exactly answer your question, but I think it is still worth thinking about it.

You can achieve this with the following code:

var result = "_" + Regex.Replace(input, @"[^a-zA-Z0-9]", "_");
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Thanks this looks good. I'm not really good at Regex so do you know how such a regex should look like? –  RoflcoptrException Mar 24 '11 at 16:56
    
@Roflcoptr: var result = "_" + Regex.Replace(input, @"[^[0-9a-zA-Z]]*", "_"); –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 24 '11 at 17:03
    
@Daniel Hilgarth: Thanks! –  RoflcoptrException Mar 24 '11 at 17:03
1  
@Roflcoptr: Wait a moment. This doesn't quite work as it should. It won't replace the opening square bracket in a8.923()/&%.As[d]. I need to check it, not quite sure, why it is happening. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 24 '11 at 17:07
    
@Roflcoptr: I updated my answer, now it is correct :-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 24 '11 at 17:10

To avoid potential duplicates, I would also consider replacing each occurence of an invalid character with something unique, for example, its hexadecimal representation in the UTF-8 encoding:

Regex.Replace( s, @"[^a-zA-Z0-9]",
               m => {
                      var bytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes( m.Value );
                      var hexs = bytes.Select( b => string.Format( "_{0:x2}", b ) );
                      return String.Concat( hexs );
                     } );
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1  
A good hint thanks +1 –  RoflcoptrException Mar 24 '11 at 23:20

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