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I have a requirement to display a hierarchy of projects. The obvious solution is a series of nested unordered lists. However, the problem I need to overcome is that the node value needs to be left aligned across the entire tree with the project name being indented as expected in a tree. Here is a sample

  Project Root Node
1    Task 1
1.1     Travel
1.2     Do Work
2    Task 2
2.1     Perform Testing
2.1.1      UI Testing
2.1.2      Connection Testing

The markup is fairly simple...

<ul>
   <li><span></span>Project Root Node
      <ul>
         <li><span>1</span>Task 1
            <ul>
               <li><span>1.1</span>Travel</li>
               <li><span>1.2</span>Do Work</li>
            </ul>
         </li>
         ...and so on...

Turning the bullets off is easy. Left aligning every li is easy. But the problem is getting the span to stay to the left while the text after the span is properly indented and aligned for that level.

The closest I could get it was that since the span for each level has the same number of characters I could just add a right margin and that would push the following text over. The problem is that since the characters in the span vary slightly in width, the text could be one or two pixels off in vertical alignment with the row above or below.

The other solution I had was to include a "level number" class when rendering the li element along with an appropriate style that set inline-block and width. My problem with that is making sure I defined enough levels to cover any tree depth.

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Have you considered using tables? –  CAPSLOCK Mar 24 '11 at 17:00
    
Have you considered using two div's side by side? –  Raynos Mar 24 '11 at 17:03
    
@LukeLandwalker Im gonna kill you... tables... for non tabular data, what are you smoking man! –  Myles Gray Mar 24 '11 at 17:04
    
This is tabular data. You have two columns of information: a section number and its title. What's non-tabular about that? –  syrion Mar 24 '11 at 17:08
    
Ironically, I am actually converting legacy code that uses tables and divs and spans... However, in my opinion it is not tabular data. There is a obvious parent-child relationship between the nodes of the tree. –  Jason Mar 24 '11 at 17:24

3 Answers 3

This might be a little "hackish," but what I would do is use the nested unordered lists, as you have them, and place the spans in there as well with classes like list-level-1, list-level-2, and so on. For JavaScript-disabled browsers, it'll display as a normal nested list. Using jQuery or another JavaScript library, convert the lists into series of <div>s (with two classes like list-item-number and list-item-level-1, list-item-level-2). Set the margin-left for the latter to appropriate widths.

<div class="row"><div class="list-item-number">1</div><div class="list-item-level-1">Fruits</div></div>
<div class="row"><div class="list-item-number">1.1</div><div class="list-item-level-2">Apples</div>
<div class="row"><div class="list-item-number">1.1.1</div><div class="list-item-level-3">Red Delicious</div>
<div class="row"><div class="list-item-number">1.1.2</div><div class="list-item-level-3">Fuji</div>

You could even use a table to a similar effect (and superior semantic meaning, in my opinion), but I have had bad luck with tables and jQuery.

For a pure HTML/CSS solution, your best option is to use a table. Remember that tables aren't inherently bad -- they're just bad for layout.

share|improve this answer
    
In the end I may well have to go with tables...I am just not convinced that it is tabular data. If I am going to go with list-level-# (I mentioned that approach in my original post) to control indenting, I might as well leave it as an unordered list. I am not seeing the benefit of using javascript to convert it. What am I missing? –  Jason Mar 24 '11 at 17:27
    
Using JavaScript to convert from the UL style to a presentational style allows you to think of the data as it should, conceptually, be laid out. JavaScript allows you to control the appearance of it more exactly than CSS. –  syrion Mar 24 '11 at 17:34
    
That comment was poorly worded. What I should say is that using JavaScript to render the data client-side allows you to store the data in a format that represents its natural structure, while also presenting the data in a visually appealing way. It degrades gracefully, becoming a plain <ul> when a user does not have JavaScript. –  syrion Mar 24 '11 at 17:41
    
I see what your saying Syrion...just not sure I agree. Either markup (when using the list-level-# class approach) is going to require CSS to get the proper width and right margin of the node number or left-margin of the text in order to get this to line up. Since I am already using CSS I think I am better off leaving it as nested lists. At this time I am not going to mark this as the answer as I was looking for a non-track-the-level approach... –  Jason Mar 24 '11 at 17:55

To keep everything aligned correctly, I would take the spans out of normal flow by floating them and give them a negative margin. This will cause them not to affect the layout of the text unless they actually run into it. You'll need a rule for each level of the list, but that's just kind of endemic to nested lists in CSS*.

ul {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  list-style-type: none;
}

li {
  margin-left:1em;
  padding-left: 0;
}

li li span {
  display: block;
  float: left;
  margin-left: -2em;
}

li li li span { margin-left: -3em; }

I just tested it in the horribly broken IE 5 for Mac and it worked perfectly, so I assume newer versions should be OK, unlike solutions using pseudo-elements and generated content (which are stylistically superior but break in Explorer <8).

* Repetitive CSS like this can be trivially generated — a quick Ruby one-liner would be (2..10).each {|n| puts("#{'li '*n}span {margin-left: -#{n}em}")}, with 10 replaced by the number of levels

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an ordered list with a bit of counters magic, no IE7 and below, though it degrades to an indented numbered list.

CSS

ol {
  counter-reset: item; 
  padding: 0; 
  margin: 0;
  margin-left: 20px !ie7;
}
ul {margin: 0; padding: 0; list-style: none;}
li {
  display: block;
}
ol li:before {
  display: inline-block; 
  content: counters(item, ".") " "; 
  counter-increment: item;
  width: 50px;
}
ol li li:before {width: 70px;}
ol li li li:before {width: 90px;}
ol li li li li:before {width: 110px;}

and the HTML:

<ul>
   <li>Project Root Node
   <ol>
   <li>Task 1
      <ol>
      <li>Travel (1.1)
        <ol>
        <li>Travel (1.1.1)</li>
        <li>Do Work (1.1.2)</li>
        </ol>
      </li>
      <li>Do Work (1.2)</li>
      </ol>
    </li>
    <li>Task 2
      <ol>
      <li>Travel (2.1)</li>
      <li>Do Work (2.2)</li>
      </ol>
    </li>
       <li>Task 3
      <ol>
      <li>Travel (3.1)</li>
      <li>Do Work (3.2)</li>
      </ol>
    </li>
  </ol>
</li>   
</ul>

adjust the widths of the :before psuedo elements to create the indented text

updated to make project node not numbered and include IE7 remargin

UPDATE

link to JSFiddle containing a samle of code using dls (definition lists) instead bearing in mind the need for IE7 support

JSFiddle using DL

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that IE7 is my primary target for this site. The site is an internal website used at the company. –  Jason Mar 25 '11 at 15:12
    
hmm.. that sucks - in that case what about a dl where you manually put the numbering in the dt and use the dd for li - the top node could then be a plain heading element - I had to do this once for a large TOC and I think I coded it in GASP MSWORD so it auto generated the numbering I then searched and replaced the code to wrap the dd and dd tags –  clairesuzy Mar 25 '11 at 15:51
    
I've updated answer to include link to sample using dls –  clairesuzy Mar 25 '11 at 16:24

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