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Whoopee, not working on that socket library for the moment. I'm trying to educate myself a little more in C++.

With classes, is there a way to make a variable read-only to the public, but read+write when accessed privately? e.g. something like this:

class myClass {
    private:
    int x; // this could be any type, hypothetically

    public:
    void f() {
        x = 10; // this is OK
    }
}

int main() {
    myClass temp;

    // I want this, but with private: it's not allowed
    cout << temp.x << endl;


    // this is what I want:

    // this to be allowed
    temp.f(); // this sets x...

    // this to be allowed
    int myint = temp.x;

    // this NOT to be allowed
    temp.x = myint;
}

My question, condensed, is how to allow full access to x from within f() but read-only access from anywhere else, i.e. int newint = temp.x; allowed, but temp.x = 5; not allowed? like a const variable, but writable from f()...

EDIT: I forgot to mention that I plan to be returning a large vector instance, using a getX() function would only make a copy of that and it isn't really optimal. I could return a pointer to it, but that's bad practice iirc.

P.S.: Where would I post if I just want to basically show my knowledge of pointers and ask if it's complete or not? Thanks!

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9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Of course you can:

class MyClass
{
    int x_;

public:
    int x() const { return x_; }
};

If you don't want to make a copy (for integers, there is no overhead), do the following:

class MyClass
{
    std::vector<double> x_;

public:
    const std::vector<double>& x() const { return x_; }
};

This does not make any copy. It returns a reference to const.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, I think this is what I want. I would use like: MyClass mclass; vector<double> *temp = mclass.x()? –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 19:04
    
@FurryHead: nope, you would use it like const vector<double>& tmp = mclass.x() and use tmp as if it were a non modifiable vector (the compiler won't let you modify it). You can do also double x = mclass.x()[3] but not mclass.x()[3] = 42. –  Alexandre C. Mar 24 '11 at 19:07
    
MyClass mclass; const vector<double>& v = mclass.x(); –  juanchopanza Mar 24 '11 at 19:08
    
@Alexandre, Great example. One last question about your solution: If mclass gets destructed, would the reference-to-x tmp have undefined contents/behaviour ? –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 19:14
    
@FurryHead: Good point: yes, accessing the referenced object is undefined behaviour in the case it has been destroyed. This situation is known as a "dangling reference". In this respect, references are very similar to pointers. –  Alexandre C. Mar 24 '11 at 19:29

While I think a getter function that returns const T& is the better solution, you can have almost precisely the syntax you asked for:

class myClass {
    private:
    int x_; // Note: different name than public, read-only interface

    public:
    void f() {
        x_ = 10; // Note use of private var
    }
    const int& x;
    myClass() : x_(42), x(x_) {} // must have constructor to initialize reference
};

int main() {
    myClass temp;

    // temp.x is const, so ...
    cout << temp.x << endl; // works
    // temp.x = 57;  // fails

}

EDIT: With a proxy class, you can get precisely the syntax you asked for:

class myClass {
public:

    template <class T>
    class proxy {
        friend class myClass;
    private:
        T data;
        T operator=(const T& arg) { data = arg; return data; }
    public:
        operator const T&() const { return data; }
    };

    proxy<int> x;
    // proxy<std::vector<double> > y;


    public:
    void f() {
        x = 10; // Note use of private var
    }
};

temp.x appears to be a read-write int in the class, but a read-only int in main.

share|improve this answer
    
Why not. I upvote this because this tries hard to get the desired behaviour. However, if you have eg. void f(MyClass) and MyClass is contructible by an int, you can't do f(myObj.x), so the behaviour is not quite the same. –  Alexandre C. Mar 24 '11 at 21:54
    
@AlexandreC.: I think with C++11 you can set the constructor to explicit, like so: explicit MyClass(int s);, which will prevent the implicit creation of a temporary MyClass. –  Markus Jun 3 at 13:10
    
@Markus: Actually my point was the exact opposite: you cannot chain user-defined conversions, you are allowed at most one. Since you already spent the conversion proxy<int> -> int, you cannot use myObj.x as an argument of a function expecting something implicitly constructible from int. (also C++03 allows explicit as well) –  Alexandre C. Jun 3 at 19:40

You would have to leave it private and then make a function to access the value;

private:

    int x;

public:

    int X()
    {
        return x;
    }
share|improve this answer

This may do what you want.

If you want a readonly variable but don't want the client to have to change the way they access it, try this templated class:

template<typename MemberOfWhichClass, typename primative>                                       
class ReadOnly {
    friend MemberOfWhichClass;
public:
    inline operator primative() const                 { return x; }

    template<typename number> inline bool   operator==(const number& y) const { return x == y; } 
    template<typename number> inline number operator+ (const number& y) const { return x + y; } 
    template<typename number> inline number operator- (const number& y) const { return x - y; } 
    template<typename number> inline number operator* (const number& y) const { return x * y; }  
    template<typename number> inline number operator/ (const number& y) const { return x / y; } 
    template<typename number> inline number operator<<(const number& y) const { return x <<y; }
    template<typename number> inline number operator>>(const number& y) const { return x >> y; }
    template<typename number> inline number operator^ (const number& y) const { return x ^ y; }
    template<typename number> inline number operator| (const number& y) const { return x | y; }
    template<typename number> inline number operator& (const number& y) const { return x & y; }
    template<typename number> inline number operator&&(const number& y) const { return x &&y; }
    template<typename number> inline number operator||(const number& y) const { return x ||y; }
    template<typename number> inline number operator~() const                 { return ~x; }

protected:
    template<typename number> inline number operator= (const number& y) { return x = y; }       
    template<typename number> inline number operator+=(const number& y) { return x += y; }      
    template<typename number> inline number operator-=(const number& y) { return x -= y; }      
    template<typename number> inline number operator*=(const number& y) { return x *= y; }      
    template<typename number> inline number operator/=(const number& y) { return x /= y; }      
    template<typename number> inline number operator&=(const number& y) { return x &= y; }
    template<typename number> inline number operator|=(const number& y) { return x |= y; }
    primative x;                                                                                
};      

Example Use:

class Foo {
public:
    ReadOnly<Foo, int> x;
};

Now you can access Foo.x, but you can't change Foo.x! Remember you'll need to add bitwise and unary operators as well! This is just an example to get you started

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Any thoughts on how to extend this to arbitrary classes, not just primitives? Preferably avoiding the container class having to use special syntax for read and write access. –  mangledorf Oct 14 at 23:48
    
Also, this unfortunately doesn't play well with derived classes. Suppose you have class Bar : public Foo, you can't seem to have Foo's members publicly read only but read and write accessible to member functions in Bar (non-inheritance and non-transitivity of friendship). –  mangledorf Oct 15 at 3:06
    
This is designed for primitives. Class members that are objects can have const functions to make them 'read only'. To make them accessible by the containing class (as the question pertains) make that class a friend class and make the non-const functions private. –  Jonathan Leaders Oct 17 at 20:54
    
But I'll need to make the derived class a friend of ReadOnly, but if the inherited class has ReadOnly members and doesn't know about its derived classes yet, there's no way to know to make the derived classes friends of ReadOnly. So then the ReadOnly members of the inherited class are not "writable" by the derived class. See new question stackoverflow.com/q/26383155/148668 –  mangledorf Oct 19 at 18:54

You need to make the member private and provide a public getter method.

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As I just commented on appleskin's answer, and edited my post, that wouldn't be optimal as that makes a copy of the variable to return, and I plan to be returning a large vector. –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 19:01
    
@FurryHead: Then you should of course return by const reference. Anyway, that information was not available by the time I answered. –  Jon Mar 24 '11 at 20:27

but temp.x = 5; not allowed?

This is any how not allowed in the snippet posted because it is anyhow declared as private and can be accessed in the class scope only.

Here are asking for accessing

cout << temp.x << endl;

but here not for-

int myint = temp.x;

This sounds very contradictory.

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I know. But a private: variable cannot be accessed with int myint = temp.x; - I want read access, but not write access to the public. –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 19:00
    
If it's a private variable, it can be accessed in the scope of class only.(period) –  Mahesh Mar 24 '11 at 19:03
1  
I was only making example using private:, I don't want private as it blocks all access. I want it to act like a const publicly, but a non-const locally. –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 19:08

You may want to mimic C# properties for access (depending what you're going for, intended environment, etc.).

class Foo
{
  private:
    int bar;

  public:
    __declspec( property( get = Getter ) ) int Bar;

    void Getter() const
    {
      return bar;
    }
}
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The only way I know of granting read-only access to private data members in a c++ class is to have a public function. In your case, it will like:

int getx() const { return x; }

or

int x() const { return x; }.

By making a data member private you are by default making it invisible (a.k.a no access) to the scope outside of the class. In essence, the members of the class have read/write access to the private data member (assuming you are not specifying it to be const). friends of the class get access to the private data members.

Refer here and/or any good C++ book on access specifiers.

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1  
Thanks for the reference. I was only making example using private:, I don't want private as it blocks all access. I want it to act like a const publicly, but a non-const locally. –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 19:07

Write a public getter function.

int getX(){ return x; }
share|improve this answer
    
The trouble with this is, and I should have mentioned, that what I plan to be returning is a large vector - that wouldn't really be optimal, as it's making a copy. –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 18:58
    
The trouble with this is that x isn't void :) @FurryHead: then return a const reference. –  ybungalobill Mar 24 '11 at 18:59
    
Like, const int* getX() { return &x; } ? –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 19:02
    
@FurryHead: almost (your approach is ok, but there is a better solution). You may want to read about references in a C++ book. They provide the semantics you are looking for. –  Alexandre C. Mar 24 '11 at 19:04
    
Okie dokie. Got any books you'd recommend? :-D –  FurryHead Mar 24 '11 at 19:05

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