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My view model is along the lines of

EditViewModel
    SomeUserType User
        Dictionary<string, string> Claims

In my view I'm trying to bind this as follows

@{
    int i = 0;
    foreach (var key in Model.User.Claims.Keys)
    {                                                                       
            <div class="editor">
                <input type="hidden" value="@i" name="User.Claims.Index">
                <div class="editor-label">
                    @Html.Label(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Key", i))
                </div>
                <div class="editor-field">
                    @Html.Editor(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Key", i))
                </div>
                <div class="editor-label">
                    @Html.Label(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Value", i))
                </div>
                <div class="editor-field">
                    @Html.Editor(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Value", i))
                </div>
            </div>    
        i++;
    }
}

Which renders out the series of Key Value pair text boxes on the edit screen as I would expect. However the text boxes are always empty even though there are KeyValuePairs in the Claims dictionary.

If I fill in values for the KVP text boxes and post the form back to my controller I do get the values correctly model bound back into my User.Claims Dictionary.

What am I missing that is preventing the binding from having the correct values in it as the view loads?

Edit: Additional information, basically I'm trying to figure out how exactly this works for MVC inherently. I created my view above directly from the core MVC (2) object template that Brad Wilson discusses here. I tried to find the exact code for this in Razor but I couldn't find it at all anywhere... digressing... Converting this to Razor I ended up with

@if (ViewData.TemplateInfo.TemplateDepth > 4) 
{
    @ViewData.ModelMetadata.SimpleDisplayText
}
else
{
    <div class="editor">    
        @foreach (var prop in ViewData.ModelMetadata.Properties
            .Where(pm => pm.ShowForEdit && !ViewData.TemplateInfo.Visited(pm)))
        {                        

            if (prop.HideSurroundingHtml)
            {
            @Html.Editor(prop.PropertyName)
            }
            else
            {
                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Html.Label(prop.PropertyName)
                                                            .ToHtmlString()))
                {
                    <div class="editor-label"> @Html.Label(prop.PropertyName) 
                    </div>
                }

                <div class="editor-field">
                    @Html.Editor(prop.PropertyName)
                    @Html.ValidationMessage(prop.PropertyName)
                </div>            
            }
        }
    </div>    
}

The main difference is the edit to the @if (ViewData.TemplateInfo.TemplateDepth > 4) which will allow MVC to dive deep enough that it reaches my dictionary it can then bind everything correctly. However upon further interrogation with debugging I see when it binds the Key property it actually sees just @Html.Editor("Key") how does this work?

Clearly Editor must have some kind of knowledge of ViewData.ModelMetadata.Properties and however it determines ViewData.TemplateInfo.Visited()'s result that it's able to correctly place the right stuff, just at this point I'm at a loss of what's happening behind the scenes that somehow inside of this foreach loop that @Html.Editor("Key") does ANYTHING.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@Html.Editor(string name) will generate editor for field name in ViewData. If ViewData not contains your object, you must used another overload: @Html.Editor(string name, object viewData).

In your case, you can replace @Html.Label(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Key", i)) with @Html.Label(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Key", i),User.Claims[i].Value)

share|improve this answer
    
very interesting, I'll check this out first thing Monday morning before the bounty expires! –  Chris Marisic Apr 3 '11 at 17:17
    
This is definitely on the right track, I haven't figured out what exactly to plug into the object additionalViewData yet –  Chris Marisic Apr 4 '11 at 13:17
    
ASP.NET MVC is open source, and you can view source code to know everything of background. –  langtu Apr 5 '11 at 4:16

Try like this:

@{
    var i = 0;
    foreach (var key in Model.User.Claims.Keys)
    {
        <div class="editor">
            <input type="hidden" value="@i" name="User.Claims.Index" />
            <div class="editor-label">
                @Html.Label(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Key", i))
            </div>
            <div class="editor-field">
                @Html.TextBox(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Key", i), key)
            </div>
            <div class="editor-label">
                @Html.Label(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Value", i))
            </div>
            <div class="editor-field">
                @Html.TextBox(string.Format("User.Claims[{0}].Value", i), Model.User.Claims[key])
            </div>
        </div>            
        i++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That does indeed work that still doesn't explain why the Editor syntax DOESN'T work when I'm basically trying to emulate what happens directly in MVC when you alter the Object editor template to do a deep dive into a model and the entire code in the Object editor templates primarily consists of @Html.Editor(prop.PropertyName) –  Chris Marisic Mar 25 '11 at 12:55
1  
@ Chris Marisic, the reason your code doesn't work is because you are not passing any model value to the editor template. You are simply using the User.Claims[i].Key syntax but that syntax is used by the default model binder as input parameters but not by the helpers as output when fetching values. Personally I would recommend you to avoid using dictionaries in your view models and replace them with lists of custom types. –  Darin Dimitrov Mar 25 '11 at 13:02
    
I don't get how my usage here is any different than the way this works inherently as seen in the EditorTemplates/Object.ascx section on bradwilson.typepad.com/blog/2009/10/… The object template they have here has nothing else other than property name (functional wise), i'm not sure why this code will bind it but not my code. I don't see how there could be any contextual differences between the 2. Also I don't see any differences in relation to this vs a custom list except most custom lists would have more properties than Key/Value. –  Chris Marisic Mar 25 '11 at 16:27
    
I retract my statement of not seeing any contextual differences, I had assumed with debugging I would actually see "property.Name" evaluate to the indexed string value but it is merely Key without any type of indexers, very strange. –  Chris Marisic Mar 29 '11 at 15:43
   @{
 foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> item  in Model.ShippingCarrier)
 {
    <tr>
    <td>
   @Html.TextBox(item.Key.ToString(), item.Key, new { @class = "w50" }) : @Html.TextBox(item.Key.ToString(), item.Key, new { @class = "w50" }) 
    </td>
   </tr>

 }
    }
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