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How do I check if a user's input is a number (e.g. -1, 0, 1, etc.)?

user_input = input("Enter something:")

if type(user_input) == int:
    print("Is a number")
else:
    print("Not a number")

The above won't work since input always returns a string.

share|improve this question
    
I don't know whether in "input always returns strings", "returns" is correct. – Trufa Mar 24 '11 at 19:56
    
it looks like you're using python 3.x in which case yes input always returns strings. See: docs.python.org/release/3.1.3/library/functions.html#input – Daniel DiPaolo Mar 24 '11 at 19:57
    
@DanielDiPaolo: Oh yes, I'm aware of that, hence the question, I was just didn't know if the word return was correct. – Trufa Mar 24 '11 at 20:00
    
ah, then yes the term "returns" is precisely the correct term! – Daniel DiPaolo Mar 24 '11 at 20:02
    
@Trufa if type(eval(user_input)) == int: this might work. – Rakesh_Kulkarni Feb 3 at 7:01

13 Answers 13

up vote 132 down vote accepted

Simply try converting it to an int and then bailing out if it doesn't work.

try:
   val = int(userInput)
except ValueError:
   print("That's not an int!")
share|improve this answer
2  
This lets you accept things like 4.1 when technically only 4 is valid. It is also against the python mentality to have secret conversions like this happening and I would prefer to do strict checks at my public interface – Peter R Feb 19 '15 at 14:24
1  
@PeterR I think this works if you convert from a string. – arhuaco Mar 5 '15 at 8:17
    
@PeterR You could use float() instead of int() – PythonMaster Mar 5 '15 at 23:55
    
this one is not working to check if the value is boolean or integer, boolean is considered as 0 or 1. – Aryan Firouzyan Feb 21 at 22:19

Apparently this will not work for negative values, but it will for positive. Sorry about that, just learned about this a few hours ago myself as I have just recently gotten into Python.

Use isdigit()

if userinput.isdigit():
    #do stuff
share|improve this answer
19  
"-1".isdigit() == False – BatchyX Mar 24 '11 at 19:55
1  
Thanks for the clarification. – Trufa Mar 24 '11 at 20:11
    
Does it work for float numbers? – Llopis Jan 8 '14 at 15:23
1  
I don't believe so, Llopis. I kind of jumped the gun answering questions before I knew enough back when I gave this answer. I would do the same as Daniel DiPaolo's answer for the int, but use float() instead of int(). – jmichalicek Jan 8 '14 at 18:50
    
Negative numbers and floats return false because '-' and '.' are not digits. The isdigit() function checks if every character in the string is between '0' and '9'. – Carl H Apr 14 '15 at 9:58

For Python 3 the following will work.

userInput = 0
while True:
  try:
     userInput = int(input("Enter something: "))       
  except ValueError:
     print("Not an integer!")
     continue
  else:
     print("Yes an integer!")
     break 
share|improve this answer

EDITED: You could also use this below code to find out if its a number or also a negative

import re
num_format = re.compile("^[\-]?[1-9][0-9]*\.?[0-9]+$")
isnumber = re.match(num_format,givennumber)
if isnumber:
    print "given string is number"

you could also change your format to your specific requirement. I am seeing this post a little too late.but hope this helps other persons who are looking for answers :) . let me know if anythings wrong in the given code.

share|improve this answer
    
This will check if there is a numeric (float, int, etc) within the string. However, if there is more than just the numeric, it will still return a result. For example: "1.2 Gbps" will return a false positive. This may or may not be useful to some people. – Brian Bruggeman May 28 '15 at 19:35
    
@BrianBruggeman thanks for pointing the error out. This has been useful for me. :) – karthik27 Aug 24 '15 at 9:17
    
Also note: for anyone now looking, my original comment is no longer valid. :P Thanks for the update @karthik27! – Brian Bruggeman Aug 24 '15 at 14:30

I think that what you'd be looking for here is the method isnumeric() (Documentation for python3.x):

>>>a = '123'
>>>a.isnumeric()
true

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer

Works fine for check if an input is a positive Integer AND in a specific range

def checkIntValue():
    '''Works fine for check if an **input** is
   a positive Integer AND in a specific range'''
    maxValue = 20
    while True:
        try:
            intTarget = int(input('Your number ?'))
        except ValueError:
            continue
        else:
            if intTarget < 1 or intTarget > maxValue:
                continue
            else:
                return (intTarget)
share|improve this answer

I would recommend this, @karthik27, for negative numbers

import re
num_format = re.compile(r'^\-?[1-9][0-9]*\.?[0-9]*')

Then do whatever you want with that regular expression, match(), findall() etc

share|improve this answer
    
good idea. clean and practical. Although it needs some changes for specific cases, say it matches 3.4.5 at the moment too – Jadi Dec 25 '15 at 8:06

This works with any number, including a fraction:

import fractions

def isnumber(s):
   try:
     float(s)
     return True
   except ValueError:
     try: 
       Fraction(s)
       return True
     except ValueError: 
       return False
share|improve this answer

I know this is pretty late but its to help anyone else that had to spend 6 hours trying to figure this out. (thats what I did):

This works flawlessly: (checks if any letter is in the input/checks if input is either integer or float)

a=(raw_input("Amount:"))

try:
    int(a)
except ValueError:
    try:
        float(a)
    except ValueError:
        print "This is not a number"
        a=0


if a==0:
    a=0
else:
    print a
    #Do stuff
share|improve this answer

I also ran into problems this morning with users being able to enter non-integer responses to my specific request for an integer.

This was the solution that ended up working well for me to force an answer I wanted:

player_number = 0
while player_number != 1 and player_number !=2:
    player_number = raw_input("Are you Player 1 or 2? ")
    try:
        int(player_number)
    except ValueError:
        print "Please enter '1' or '2'..."
        player_number = 0
    player_number = int(player_number)

I would get exceptions before even reaching the try: statement when I used

player_number = int(raw_input("Are you Player 1 or 2? ") 

and the user entered "J" or any other non-integer character. It worked out best to take it as raw input, check to see if that raw input could be converted to an integer, and then convert it afterward.

share|improve this answer
    
It's generally a good idea to only catch the exceptions you're handling. In this case it'd be ValueError. – Holloway Sep 11 '14 at 10:19
    
Thanks for the tip! I've edited the solution to include that feedback. That was my first ever SO solution! – John Worrall Sep 13 '14 at 16:40

a=10

isinstance(a,int) #True

b='abc'

isinstance(b,int) #False

share|improve this answer
    
When posting code, try to format it – Anton Oct 20 '15 at 8:57

Here is a simple function that checks input for INT and RANGE. Here, returns 'True' if input is integer between 1-100, 'False' otherwise

def validate(userInput):

    try:
        val = int(userInput)
        if val > 0 and val < 101:
            valid = True
        else:
            valid = False

    except Exception:
        valid = False

    return valid
share|improve this answer
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! This is an old question, and the accepted answer seems to be pretty good. Are you sure that you have something new to add? – Dietrich Epp Nov 11 '15 at 21:57
    
I thought it was a slight improvement: no less efficient while avoiding the nested if-else. I'm new here, if the answer hurts the community no hard feels if it's removed. – Jesse Downing Nov 11 '15 at 22:31

Here is the simplest solution:

a= input("Choose the option\n")

if(int(a)):
    print (a);
else:
    print("Try Again")
share|improve this answer
    
SyntaxError: 'return' outside function. Also, a is int will never evaluate to True. – N. Wouda Jan 6 at 20:48
    
thanks @N.Wouda for your help , i have made the changes,check this – Pb Studies Jan 6 at 22:31
    
Are you sure that your answer is actually contributing something new to this question? – N. Wouda Jan 6 at 22:39
    
@N.Wouda actually I'm in a learning stage and trying to help others, so they don't get stuck in such basic problems. – Pb Studies Jan 6 at 22:42
    
That is quite commendable, don't get me wrong. But this particular question seems like it was already well-covered by the other answers, so it might be more productive to answer questions that do not yet have good anwers! – N. Wouda Jan 6 at 22:51

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