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I'm trying to import a spreadsheet to our database using SSIS. For some reason SSIS wants to believe two of the columns are of type Double, when they contain character data. I've tried remapping the columns to be nvarchar(255) but it still doesn't want to select the data it thinks is double, because there are characters in it. If I try to edit the SSIS package and change the column types in the Excel Source, it won't let me change the type of the columns in the Error Output and gives me an error if the regular output and error output columns don't match.

Why is SSIS insisting that these columns are Double? How can I force it to realize these are strings? Why does everything from microsoft have to not quite work correctly?

EDIT: I found this: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/236605

I sorted my data so that mixed data types would be at the top, and guess what: The problem reversed. Instead of not importing character data, it stopped importing purely numeric data. Apparently someone doesn't think 12345 can be represented as a string...

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Similar to this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/779754/…. –  David C Feb 22 '13 at 22:11
    
Now you know why I ask people to provide .csv files instead of Excel files for import. I never accept an Execl file if I can help it. Seriously, if you have any way to ask the provider to give you the file in a decent format, I would do that rather than spend time trying to solve a problem like this. –  HLGEM Jan 7 at 18:20

11 Answers 11

up vote 21 down vote accepted

I've seen this issue before, it's Excel that is the issue not SSIS. Excel samples the 1st few rows and then infers the data type even if you explicitly set it to text. What you need to do is put this into the Excel file connection string in the SSIS package. This instruction tells Excel that the columns contain mixed data types and hints it to do extra checking before deciding that the column is a numeric type when in fact it's not.

;Extended Properties="IMEX=1"

It should work with this (in most cases). The safer thing to do is export the Excel data to tab delimited text and use SSIS to import that.

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1  
I could only edit the connection string by saving the SSIS package and going into visual studio, which worked BUT I kept getting errors trying to run the package. Finally exported to tab delimited... This was WAY harder than it should be. :( –  Telos Feb 12 '09 at 18:46
    
If you use a package configuration file you can load in a whole new connection string at runtime including the IMEX connection string property. Also the shedule task or execute package dialog allows you to override any of the connection strings as well. –  James Feb 12 '09 at 19:24

One thing that isn't mentioned in the accepted answer is that the "IMEX=1" parameter has to go inside the quoted portion of:

...;Extended Properties="...";
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Another workaround is to sort the spreadsheet with the character data at the top, thereby causing Excel to see the column as string, and importing everything as such.

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Handy if you cant edit the package. –  daveD Feb 21 '12 at 11:54

;IMEX=1; is not always working... Everything about mixed datatypes in Excel: Mixed data types in Excel column

enter image description here

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You can convert (ie. force) the column data to text... Try this (Note: These instructions are based on Excel 2007)...

The following steps should force Excel to treat the column as text:

Open your spreadsheet with Excel.

Select the whole column that contains your "mostly numeric data" by clicking on the column header.

Click on the Data tab on the ribbon menu.

Select Text to Columns. This will bring up the Convert Text to Columns Wizard.

-On Step 1: Click Next

-On Step 2: Click Next

-On Step 3: Select Text and click Finish

Save your Excel sheet.

Retry the import using the SQL Server 2005 Import Data Wizard.

Also, here's a link to another question which has additional responses:

Import Data Wizard Does Not Like Data Type I Choose For A Column

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You can also alter the registry to look at more values than just the first 8 rows. I have used this method and works quite well.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/281517

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Well IMEX=1 did not work for me. Neither did Reynier Booysen's suggestion. (I don't know if it makes a difference but I'm using SQL Server 2008r2). A good explanation of some workarounds and also some explanations of why IMEX=1 is limited to the first eight rows of each spreadsheet can be found at http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/sqlintegrationservices/thread/78b87712-8ffe-4c72-914b-f1c031ba6c75

Hope this helps

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Option 1. Use Visual Basic to iterate through each column and format each column as Text.

Use the Text-to-Columns menu, don't change the delimination, and change "General" to "Text"

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I had the same problem. The problem sit in the Excel Source task. When you setup this task the first time, the task will connect to the specified Excel file (via the Excel connection) and decide what type each column is based on the current spreadsheet.

Thus, if you set up the Excel Source task, just make sure that the columns that should be text only has text in the column. This means that the Excel Source task will always assume that any subsequent spreadsheets will have the same format and will read 12345 as text because the column was text when the task was set up.

Hope it makes sense!

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I've used the following recipe:

  1. Import data from Excel to Access
  2. Import data from Access to SQL Server

and it worked for me...

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Can you explain how that helps maintain the correct types? On the face of it, your answer doesn't seem to answer the question. –  Stephen Ostermiller Jun 16 at 10:35

I had the same issue, multiple data type values in single column, package load only numeric values. Remains all it updated as null.

Solution

To fix this changing the excel data type is one of the solution. In Excel Copy the column data and paste in different file. Delete that column and insert new column as Text datatype and paste that copied data in new column.

Now in ssis package delete and recreate the Excel source and destination table change the column data type as varchar.

This will work.

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