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Here's what I'm currently doing/trying to do to accomplish my goal. But it is not removing the "row" the way I would like it too.

So, I'm making an object, then pushing it into an array. And the adding to the array part works fine and just as I expect.

var nearProfileInfoObj:Object = new Object();
nearProfileInfoObj.type = "userInfo";
nearProfileInfoObj.dowhat = "add";
nearProfileInfoObj.userid = netConnection.nearID;
nearProfileInfoObj.username = username_input_txt.text;
nearProfileInfoObj.sex = sex_input_txt.selectedItem.toString();
nearProfileInfoObj.age = age_input_txt.selectedItem;
nearProfileInfoObj.location = location_input_txt.text;
nearProfileInfoObj.headline = headline_input_txt.text;

theArray.push(nearProfileInfoObj);

So after that later on I need to be able to remove that object from the array, and it's not working the way I'm expecting. I want to take a variable whoLeft and capture their ID and then look in the array for that particular ID in the userid part of the object and if its there DELETE that whole "row".

I know you can do a filter with an array collection but that doesnt actually delete it. I need to delete it because I may be adding the same value again later on.

whoLeft = theiruserIDVariable;
theArray.filter(userLeaving);

public function userLeaving(element:*, index:int, arr:Array):Boolean
{

    if (element.userid == whoLeft)
        {

            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            return true;
        }
}

But this doesnt seem to be deleting the whole row like it implies. Does anyone know what i'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Try theArray = theArray.filter(userLeaving). Array.filter returns a new array instead of manipulating the one you input. Assigning that array to a variable will accomplish your goal. –  user1385191 Mar 24 '11 at 20:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of modifying the original array, the new filtered array is returned by the filter method. So you need to assign the returned array to theArray.

Try this

theArray = theArray.filter(userLeaving);
share|improve this answer
    
I would like to know why this is downvoted. What mistake I have made? A comment will help me to learn more. –  taskinoor Mar 24 '11 at 20:55
    
That did it! Duh. Thanks a lot! Would you happen to know how I could "pass" 'whoLeft' into the method? I'm worried if i'm processing a bunch of filters by the time it processes one the value of whoLeft might change too quickly. edit: i dont know who downvoted you, it worked for me. so i upvoted. –  brybam Mar 24 '11 at 20:55
    
I am not sure whether it is possible to pass whoLeft into the method. But why you are thinking that the value may change? If flash is within the processing of a filter, it will complete that process and then move on to further work. There is no such thing as thread switching. –  taskinoor Mar 24 '11 at 21:04
    
I'm the one that downvoted you. The reason I did so is because your answer WOULD replace the new array, however he would not have access to the 'wholeft' object unless he stores it in a class property which makes it messy. Furthermore, the user id would be unique (or so I would assume) and it would be inefficient of iterating through ALL the items in the array just to find one user. It would need to stop after finding the user. And lastly, this filter function copies the array instead of modifying this one. –  J_A_X Mar 24 '11 at 21:08
1  
@J_A_X, is not it clear from the question that whoLeft is a class member? And about your point regarding performance, my question is "is this question about performance"? If the array is not that big, then adding manual looping code without filter may seem messy to some people. If you think that this is worth a downvote, then I have nothing to say. And from the next time please add a comment before asking "why this is downvoted". That will help us. –  taskinoor Mar 24 '11 at 21:17

EDIT This turned out to be slower than for loop:

An alternative to the hand coded loop could be something like this:

theArray.every(searchAndDestroy);

public function searchAndDestroy(element:*, index:int, arr:Array):Boolean
{
    if (element.userid == whoLeft)
    {
        arr.splice(index,1);
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

As far as I know, every() terminates the first time the test function returns false. So the question is: for a big list, which is faster, the for loop or the loop that every() does with the overhead of the test function call.

EDIT #2 But this was faster than a for loop for a test I ran on an array of a million Points:

for each(var element:Object in theArray)
{
    if (element.userid==whoLeft)
    {
        theArray.splice(theArray.indexOf(element),1);
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
A quick test shows that the for loop is about 2.5 times faster than using a built-in function like every, probably due to the overhead of the test function call. Go with J_A_X's for loop. –  Adam Smith Mar 25 '11 at 0:56
    
Further testing (to satisfy my own curiosity) shows that for each is faster still (about 50% faster than for loop on an array of a million Points at least). I'll add the code I tested to my answer above. –  Adam Smith Mar 25 '11 at 1:06
    
Nice. Way to do the benchmarking :) –  J_A_X Mar 25 '11 at 18:26

I think this is what you're looking for:

for(var i:uint = 0, len:uint = theArray.length; i<len; i++)
{
   if(thisArray[i].id == whoLeft.id)
   {
      thisArray.splice(i, 1);
      break;
   }
}

However, do you really need it in an Array because you could always use a Dictionary which would mean accessing it by id which would be a lot simpler to remove.

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