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Problem:

I am currently creating a webpage layout using divs and css rather than an HTML table layout. I want, of course, for this to be able to operate across all major browsers.

I have a pane for a banner, which has a floated menu over the left portion of it. The problem is that if the banner is too wide for the space provided, it jumps to a space below the menu (where it is wider) and takes all of the pages content with it.

Attempted solutions:

The obvious solution is to use the "overflow: hidden" property in my css. The problem is that this doesn't work in IE. I read that this is because I have it positioned relatively (which is true), but I don't see any way around using relative positioning in this case. I must keep it.

I also read that you could set the width of the pane to something besides the default, and then the "overflow: hidden" property would take effect. This DOES solve the problem in IE (setting width to 100%), but creates a problem in chrome (and potentially other browsers as well) where the alloted space for the banner is too wide for the page, and then chrome behaves the same way IE had originally - pushing the banner to the bottom of the page. This workaround could work, but I would need to define the width value as "100% - menuWidth" since there is a menu over the left side. I tried this:

style="width:expression(document.compatMode=='CSS1Compat'? document.documentElement.clientWidth-(Menu Width goes here)+'px' : body.clientWidth-(And here too)+'px');"

But using the expression doesn't appear to enable the "overflow" property, even though directly setting the width a simple value does.

EDIT: At request I have attached my code.

HTML:

    <div id="ControlPanel" runat="server" class="contentpane" align="center"></div>
    <div id="Link" runat="server" align="right" onclick="location.href='address.html';"></div>
    <div id="Header" runat="server" class="header" align="right"></div>
    <div id="Links" runat="server" class="header" align="center">LINKS</div>
    <div id="Search" runat="server" class="skingradient" align="right">[SEARCH]</div>
    <div id="LeftPane" runat="server" class="leftpane" align="left">[USER]</br>LEFT</div>
    <div id="TopPane" runat="server" class="toppane" align="left"><img src="image.jpg" alt="" /></div>
    <div id="RightPane" runat="server" class="rightpane" align="center">RIGHT</div>
    <div id="ContentPane" runat="server" class="contentpane" align="center">CONTENT</div>
    <div></div>
    <div id="BottomPane" runat="server" class="bottompane" align="center">BOTTOM</div>
    <div id="Footer" runat="server" class="skingradient" align="center">[COPYRIGHT]</div>

</body>
</html>

CSS:

#Search
{
    position: relative;
    top: -20;
    background-color: transparent;
    z-index: 1;
}

#Header
{
    height: 77px;
    background-color: #0860A8;
    background-image: url(ImagePath.gif);
    background-position: right;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    border-bottom: 1 solid white;
}

#Links
{
    background-color: #E6E6E6;
}

#TopPane
{
    border-top: 1 solid #0860A8;
    position: relative;
    top: -20;
    overflow: hidden;
}

#LeftPane
{
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    top: -20;
    width: 200px;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: #E6E6E6;
    border-right: 1 solid #0860A8;
}

#ContentPane
{
    position: relative;
    top: -20;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: Green;
    z-index: -1;
}

#RightPane
{
    z-index: 0;
    position: relative;
    top: -20;
    height: 100%;
    float: right;
    width: auto;
    background-color: Red;
    max-width: 40%;
    width:expression(document.compatMode=='CSS1Compat'? document.documentElement.clientWidth*2/5+'px' : body.clientWidth*2/5+'px');
}

The color coding is to allow for easy previewing and editing of the site.

share|improve this question
    
    
Thanks for the link. I will post there as well. –  Jonathan Mar 24 '11 at 20:48
1  
Can you post the HTML and CSS you're using? Edit Also, I think this is a valid question for SO. –  Richard Marskell - Drackir Mar 24 '11 at 20:49
3  
This is completely valid for this site. –  Rich Bradshaw Mar 24 '11 at 21:00
2  
Q: How to make * work for all browsers? A: Wait for Microsoft to go bankrupt. –  Ates Goral Mar 24 '11 at 23:01

3 Answers 3

Make sure your file begins with a doctype, for one. It goes a long way toward making browsers act alike.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
...
share|improve this answer
1  
Would I just paste that exact address before the <html> tag? –  Jonathan Mar 24 '11 at 20:54
    
Yes. The doctype tag should be first. –  Chris Laplante Mar 24 '11 at 21:00
    
That doctype skewed the site appearance, moving everything out of its place. Any idea why that is? –  Jonathan Mar 24 '11 at 21:09
1  
Unless you have very strong reasons not to, just use <!DOCTYPE html> it will put all browsers into standards mode. –  Matijs Mar 24 '11 at 22:45
1  
@Jonathan, that's an unfortunate result of each browser acting different by default. Adding a DOCTYPE can mess up your previous styling a bit just because the underlying default style changed. Just go ahead and correct your styling with the DOCTYPE in place. It's a bit of technical debt to repay, but it's a one-time cost. –  Kevin Conner Mar 27 '11 at 14:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I eventually hacked a solution that implemented slightly different styling for IE browsers.

IE has something called conditional comments, and has a 'comment' tag. Neither of these are recognized by other browsers, and are both simply passed over. The conditional comments take the following form:

<!--[if IE]> DO THIS <![endif]-->

Since it has the same structure as a typical comment (<!-- Commented code -->) it is passed over by all browsers besides IE, which apparently parses all comments looking for certain statements.

The comment tag:

<comment> HTML comment </comment>

This is recognized as a comment by IE, and is passed over, but other browsers just skip the unrecognized <comment> tag and process the line of code contained inside normally.

So my solution to this problem then since I could get IE to work one way, and other browsers another, was to place the HTML solution inside conditional comments:

<!--[if IE]><div id="TopPane" runat="server" class="toppane" align="left" style="width: 100%; overflow:hidden;"><img src="i5Banner.jpg" alt="" /></div><![endif]-->

and the solution for the remaining browsers inside the HTML 'comment' tags:

<comment><div id="TopPane" runat="server" class="toppane" align="left"><img src="i5Banner.jpg" alt="" /></div></comment>

This way I could treat IE browsers separately from other browsers. It may look ugly, but IE has apparently supported it through all IE versions and it causes no harm when encountered by other browsers, so I think I can consider it a safe and stable solution if nothing else is available.

I believe that this may offer a way around many of IE's other problems and idiosyncrasies.

share|improve this answer
    
StackOverflow isn't allowing me to accept my own answer for another two days. Meanwhile, I will edit the original question and try to make it clear that it is answered. I apologize if this inconveniences anyone. –  Jonathan Mar 24 '11 at 23:00
    
It is OK to wait 3 days until marking an answer as accepted. There is a reason for that enforcement to be in place. –  Ates Goral Mar 24 '11 at 23:03

If you wrap this floated element, and the others, in another (non-floated) div, and set the overflow property on that, it should work:

HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="the_problem_div">
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

#wrapper {
    overflow: hidden;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I just tried that without success. Could you maybe try applying it to the code I've attached and see if you have better luck than I did? That would be a VERY convenient solution... –  Jonathan Mar 24 '11 at 21:06
    
Just put the wrapper div around your first set of divs, and add the overflow: hidden rule to it, like above. –  Chris Laplante Mar 24 '11 at 21:08
    
I got this to work now in IE (because once I have the wrapper around the entire page with "overflow: hidden" I can put the div width at 100% and allow it to overflow), but chrome is still pushing the 100% width pane downwards despite the 'wrapper'... –  Jonathan Mar 24 '11 at 22:03

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