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Here's a short example of what I want to do:

abstract class Message()
case class FooMessage() extends Message
case class BarMessage() extends Message
//... other messages ...

trait Component
{
  def handleMessage(msg: Message):Unit
}

trait ComponentType1 extends Component
{
  abstract override def handleMessage(msg: FooMessage) = {
    //handle foo, pass it up the chain
    super.handleMessage(msg)
  }

  abstract override def handleMessage(msg: BarMessage) = {
    //handle bar, pass it up the chain
    super.handleMessage(msg)
  }
}

//handles some other messages, also might handle the same messages as ComponentType1
trait ComponentType2 extends Component { .. }

Then, these ComponentTypes are mixed in to a class to form an object that is completely composed of modular components.

I have a bunch of different Messages and a bunch of different Components.

  • Not all components handle all message types.
  • Multiple components can handle the same message type.
    • The message cascades up through the components, even if it's handled by another component.
  • A Component can handle more than one message type.

The problem is since handleMessage is defined in Component as accepting a Message, when I try to specialize the msg parameter it doesn't count as an override.

I know one possible solution to this is to declare a big handleMessage method with a big match statement, but I'd like to define a method per message if possible.

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3  
I think you either get mind-twisting type hackery or big match. Why you don't want to use partial functions? Note that they're easily composable using orElse method. –  CheatEx Mar 24 '11 at 22:00
1  
@CheatEx: I didn't say anything about not wanting to use partial functions. How would you use them here? –  ryeguy Mar 25 '11 at 0:23
    
See below for an example using partial functions. –  sourcedelica Mar 25 '11 at 4:20
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3 Answers

Here's a partial function based solution. Tip to CheatEx for the idea.

trait Message   
class FooMessage extends Message 
class BarMessage extends Message 

abstract class Component {
  type CPF = PartialFunction[Message, Unit]

  var pf: CPF  = { case _ => }

  def handleMessage(msg: Message) = pf(msg)
}

trait ComponentType1 extends Component {
  val ct1pf: CPF = {
    case msg: FooMessage => println("foo1")
    case msg: BarMessage => println("bar1")
  }
  pf = ct1pf orElse pf
}

trait ComponentType2 extends Component {
  val parentPf = pf
  val ct2pf: CPF = {
    case msg: 
      BarMessage => println("bar2")
      parentPf(msg)    // cascade 
  }
  pf = ct2pf orElse pf
}

object component1and2 extends ComponentType1 with ComponentType2

component1and2.handleMessage(new FooMessage)
component1and2.handleMessage(new BarMessage)

prints

foo1
bar2
bar1
share|improve this answer
    
Oh... I've wrote almost full answer. –  CheatEx Mar 25 '11 at 4:23
    
One note: it is posiible to write handle message like def handleMessage(msg: Message):Unit = if (pf.isDefinedAt(msg)) pf(msg) and avoid case _ –  CheatEx Mar 25 '11 at 4:30
    
Another question. The OP wanted the messages to be handled and cascade down. So, presumably, the output for handling new BarMessage should be 'bar2bar1' (since ComponentType2 has precedence in your example). Is it possible to implement pf as a method and get it to call super.pf? –  GKelly Mar 25 '11 at 8:26
    
@GKelly Yes, you just need to replace val with def in the pf definition. But i think approach suggested by @ericacm is better, since you have named message handlers instead of nameless super calls. –  CheatEx Mar 25 '11 at 10:36
    
Good point. I added cascading in ComponentType2. –  sourcedelica Mar 25 '11 at 12:09
show 2 more comments
trait Message   
class FooMessage extends Message 
class BarMessage extends Message 

trait Component {
  def handleMessage(msg: Message) {}
  def handleMessage(msg: FooMessage) {}
  def handleMessage(msg: BarMessage) {}
}

trait ComponentType1 extends Component {
  override def handleMessage(msg: FooMessage) = println("foo1")
  override def handleMessage(msg: BarMessage) = println("bar1")
}

trait ComponentType2 extends Component {
  override def handleMessage(msg: BarMessage) = println("bar2")
}

object component1and2 extends ComponentType1 with ComponentType2

component1and2.handleMessage(new FooMessage)
component1and2.handleMessage(new BarMessage)

prints

foo1
bar2

If you had a list somewhere of all the components in the system you could do

componentList.foreach(c => c.handleMessage(msg))

It would just no-op in Component for the components that didn't handle msg.

share|improve this answer
    
Updated to include the mixin stuff that you added. –  sourcedelica Mar 25 '11 at 2:52
    
What benefit does the visitor pattern provide over my method? The downside to both my method and your implementation is you have to define an empty method for each message type in the base component trait. –  ryeguy Mar 25 '11 at 3:13
    
I guess I'm missing something. You have 2 methods in Component - one for each Message. This is what I was trying to avoid. If I did that in my implementation, it would work anyway. –  ryeguy Mar 25 '11 at 3:36
    
yeah, you are right, it doesn't need double dispatch. –  sourcedelica Mar 25 '11 at 3:37
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For completeness:

trait Message   
class FooMessage extends Message 
class BarMessage extends Message 

trait Component {
  def handleMessage(msg: Message) {}
}

trait ComponentType1 extends Component {
  def handleMessage(msg: Message) {
    msg match {
      case m: FooMessage => println("foo1")
      case m: BarMessage => println("bar1")
      case _ => super.handleMessage(msg)
    }
  }
}

trait ComponentType2 extends Component {
  override def handleMessage(msg: Message) {
    msg match {
      case m: BarMessage =>
        println("bar2")
        super.handleMessage(m)    // cascade 
      case _ => super.handleMessage(msg)
    }
  }
}

object component1and2 extends ComponentType1 with ComponentType2

component1and2.handleMessage(new FooMessage)
component1and2.handleMessage(new BarMessage)

prints

foo
bar2
bar1
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