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Very simple question: Are controllers in ASP.NET created for every http request ? Or are they created at application startup and reused throughout requests ?

For some particular http request only the requested controller will created ? Is that right ?

If my previous assumptions are correct can I depend on it ? I want to create database context (Entity framework) that will live only for one request. If I create it as a property initialized in controller's constructor is it granted that new instance of context will be created on for every request ?

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7  
Put a breakpoint in your constructor and see what you can find out... –  Greg B Mar 24 '11 at 21:50
    
@Greg B: great idea except it will not tell me if it behaves like that always - if circumstances changes and some controller will change its behavior I have bug that might be really hard to find... –  drasto Mar 24 '11 at 21:54
1  
IoC is your friend. –  Todd Smith Mar 24 '11 at 22:06
2  
@Todd Smith please some link or at least full name. Tree letters IoC are hard to google. Thank you. –  drasto Mar 24 '11 at 22:12
1  
@drasto IoC = Inversion of control en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inversion_of_control –  Bala R Mar 24 '11 at 22:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

A Controller is created for every request by the ControllerFactory (which by default is the DefaultControllerFactory).

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.mvc.defaultcontrollerfactory.aspx

Note that the Html.Action Html Helper will create another controller.

The short version is that ControllerActivator.Create is called (for every request) to create a Controller (Which inits a new Controller either through the DependencyResolver or through the Activator if no Resolver has been set up):

public IController Create(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType) {
                    try {
                        return (IController)(_resolverThunk().GetService(controllerType) ?? Activator.CreateInstance(controllerType));
                    }

The longer version is this (Here's the code from the source From the MvcHandler)

 protected internal virtual void ProcessRequest(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        SecurityUtil.ProcessInApplicationTrust(() =>
        {
            IController controller;
            IControllerFactory factory;
            ProcessRequestInit(httpContext, out controller, out factory);

            try
            {
                controller.Execute(RequestContext);
            }
            finally
            {
                factory.ReleaseController(controller);
            }
        });
    }

private void ProcessRequestInit(HttpContextBase httpContext, out IController controller, out IControllerFactory factory)
        {
            //non relevant code

            // Instantiate the controller and call Execute
            factory = ControllerBuilder.GetControllerFactory();
            controller = factory.CreateController(RequestContext, controllerName);
            if ( controller == null )
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException(
                    String.Format(
                        CultureInfo.CurrentCulture,
                        MvcResources.ControllerBuilder_FactoryReturnedNull,
                        factory.GetType(),
                        controllerName));
            }
        }

Here's the Controller factory code

 public virtual IController CreateController(RequestContext requestContext, string controllerName) {
            Type controllerType = GetControllerType(requestContext, controllerName);
            IController controller = GetControllerInstance(requestContext, controllerType);
            return controller;
        }

Which basically calls this :

protected internal virtual IController GetControllerInstance(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType) {
            return ControllerActivator.Create(requestContext, controllerType);
        }

Which calls this method in the ControllerActivator (This code tries to ask the DependencyResolver for an instance, or just uses the Activator class):

public IController Create(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType) {
                try {
                    return (IController)(_resolverThunk().GetService(controllerType) ?? Activator.CreateInstance(controllerType));
                }

This might fall under Too much information... But I wanted to show that you really DO get a new controller for EVERY request.

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1  
{{citation needed}} –  Daniel DiPaolo Mar 24 '11 at 22:02
    
It is needed indeed. I cannot find any such information there... –  drasto Mar 24 '11 at 22:07
1  
    
@Daniel @drasto here's the citation aspnet.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/63930#266503 –  Bala R Mar 24 '11 at 22:21

I created an empty constructor for a controller and put a break point in the constructor. It got hit every time there was a new request. So I think it's created for every request. Feel free to point it out if i'm wrong.

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1  
+1 I hope you are right but I would like some better approved knowledge than just "in all cases that I've tried it worked". If it sometimes does not work like that from some reason it mean a bug. –  drasto Mar 24 '11 at 21:58
3  
@drasto: No need to worry. Controller gets instantiated for every request. Some memory does get reused though but you shouldn't worry about controller state (if yours has one). It will be initialized as expected. But there can be a situation where more than one controller will get instantiated. And that's when views call controller actions (ie. Html.RenderAction("action", "controller");) –  Robert Koritnik Mar 24 '11 at 23:24

The controller will be created when any Action in a specific Controller is performed.

I have a project where all of my Controllers inherit from an ApplicationController and every time that an action is performed, the breakpoint is hit inside of the ApplicationController - regardless of it's "current" Controller.

I initialize my agent (which works as my context) whenever my controller is created like such:

    public IWidgetAgent widgetAgent { get; set; }

    public WidgetController()
    {
        if (widgetAgent == null)
        {
            widgetAgent = new WidgetAgent();
        }

    }

This is obviously not what you need - as you mentioned that you only wanted a single instance each time it was called. But it is a good place to check what is going on each time and to ensure that another instance of your context does not currently exist.

Hope this helps.

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Controllers are created for every request. The magic happens in the routing in the gobal.aspx. The mapping paths direct MVC to which controller to create and action on the controller to call, and parameters to pass to them.

http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/asp-net-mvc-routing-overview-vb

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citation needed - cannot find supporting information in linked document. Thank you –  drasto Mar 24 '11 at 22:09
1  
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