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I'm trying to learn structs and have the following code below in the .h and .c files respectively.

    typedef struct{
    int lengthOfSong;
    int yearRecorded;
} Song;

Song makeSong (int length, int year);
void displaySong(Song theSong);

.c:

Song makeSong(int length, int year){
    Song newSong;
    newSong.lengthOfSong = length;
    newSong.yearRecorded = year;

    displaySong(newSong);

    return newSong;
}

void displaySong(Song theSong){
    printf("This is the length of the song: %i \n This is the year recorded: %i", theSong.lengthOfSong, theSong.yearRecorded);
}

For some reason i'm getting the error: song.c:1: error: expected ‘=’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘asm’ or ‘attribute’ before ‘makeSong’ song.c:11: error: expected ‘)’ before ‘theSong’

Am I doing something wrong?

Edit main (the other functions were already working):

   #include <stdio.h>
#include "math_functions.h"
#include "song.h"

main(){
    int differ = difference(10, 5);
    int thesum = sum(3, 7);
    printf("differnece: %i, sum: %i \n", differ, thesum);
    Song theSong = makeSong(5, 8);

}
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3  
Did you #include "song.h"? –  Tom Zych Mar 24 '11 at 21:55
    
yes. see the main above. (edited) –  locoboy Mar 24 '11 at 21:59
1  
Did you #include "song.h" in the .c file which contains Song makeSong(int length, int year){? Looks like not, as the cited line is the 1st, according to the compiler error message. –  Vlad Mar 24 '11 at 22:04
    
I don't think you need to do add the #include in the actual .c file...I could be wrong though, I'm new to this. –  locoboy Mar 24 '11 at 22:07
1  
@cfarm54: You do. There's no behind-the-scenes magic related to filenames in C, you have to explicitly include header files that contain the definitions (in this case Song) that you need in a .c –  Erik Mar 24 '11 at 22:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

displaySong takes an argument theSong and you're trying to use newSong

You'll also need to #include "song.h" from song.c - the error message looks like you skipped that.

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2  
As a side note, please use Song song, not Song theSong. Articles in code are so ugly. –  alternative Mar 24 '11 at 21:59
    
Note that the compiler reports error already at line 1. BTW this proves that that .c file contains no #include :) –  Vlad Mar 24 '11 at 22:02
    
Although this is true, it's not the problem. I fixed that and I still get the same issue. –  locoboy Mar 24 '11 at 22:02
    
@cfarm54: could you please post the updated code and exact error message? –  Vlad Mar 24 '11 at 22:06
1  
@cfarm54: Yes, in song.c –  Erik Mar 24 '11 at 22:13

You need to #include "song.h" in the .c file where makeSong() and displaySong() are defined. Otherwise the compiler does not know how to create objects of type Song.

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I did this. See above main. –  locoboy Mar 24 '11 at 22:09
1  
@cfarm54: Not above main. You also need the include above Song makeSong(int length, int year){. You need the include in ALL .c files. –  pmg Mar 24 '11 at 22:10
    
i think a lot of people are saying this but i'm a bit confused as to where i need to put the #include maybe. it seems like I have it in the right place in my main.c but maybe I need to put it somewhere else too? –  locoboy Mar 24 '11 at 22:14
1  
@cfarm54: First line of song.c should be #include "song.h" –  Erik Mar 24 '11 at 22:15
1  
Yes @cfarm54. You need the #include "song.h" at the top of EVERY .c FILE that refers in any way to the type Song. –  pmg Mar 24 '11 at 22:16

With the earlier corrections made, still you are getting error because program is not including song.h in both the header files. Source files need to include song.h ( i.e., in main.c and song.c, guessing you have named source files like that ). Also -

Song makeSong(int length, int year){
    Song newSong;
    newSong.lengthOfSong = length;
    newSong.yearRecorded = year;

    displaySong(newSong);

    return newSong;
}

can be simplified to -

Song makeSong(int length, int year){

    Song newSong = { length, year } ;

    displaySong(newSong);

    return newSong;
}
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Edit: Messed typedef in my previous answer:

typedef struct NAME1 {
    ...
} NAME2;

NAME1 names the struct, NAME2 the explizit type struct NAME1. Now NAME1 can't be used without struct in C, NAME2 can:

struct NAME1 myvar1;
NAME2 myvar2;

You're getting the issue cause Song isn't recognizes as a variable type (without the struct keyword before).

share|improve this answer
    
-1: Incorrect. typedef of anonymous struct isn't invalid. –  Erik Mar 24 '11 at 22:01
    
It can: ideone.com/0eBHf –  Vlad Mar 24 '11 at 22:01
    
Yes, messed the typedef, should be fixed now. –  Mario Mar 24 '11 at 22:02
    
Anonymous typedef might not be invalid, it still is ugly and unmaintainable... –  Oleiade Mar 24 '11 at 22:04

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