Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have:

select title, order#, STATE
from customers C, ORDERITEMS O, books b
where b.ISBN=O.ISBN (+)
order by title

But I'm trying to understand why rows that don't have order# have state

BODYBUILD IN 10 MINUTES A DAY   1003    CA
BODYBUILD IN 10 MINUTES A DAY   1003    WY
BODYBUILD IN 10 MINUTES A DAY   1003    TX
BODYBUILD IN 10 MINUTES A DAY   1003    NY
BODYBUILD IN 10 MINUTES A DAY   1003    WA
BODYBUILD IN 10 MINUTES A DAY   1003    ID
BODYBUILD IN 10 MINUTES A DAY   1003    FL
BUILDING A CAR WITH TOOTHPICKS  -   FL
BUILDING A CAR WITH TOOTHPICKS  -   NJ
BUILDING A CAR WITH TOOTHPICKS  -   GA
BUILDING A CAR WITH TOOTHPICKS  -   MI
share|improve this question
    
Are you sure the order number is really empty? A dash (- character) is not the same as NULL. Apart from that: please indicate from which tables the three columns are taken. –  Arjan Mar 24 '11 at 21:52
    
@Arjan Yeah I rolled back, I think the OP edited the same time as you. I guess we will see who's rollback takes precedence. –  Kyle Mar 24 '11 at 21:52
    
So what do I enter to format code? –  user490735 Mar 24 '11 at 22:03
    
What does the dash mean then? Also, order# isn't nullable. –  user490735 Mar 24 '11 at 22:05
    
books->title, customers ->state, ORDERITEMS->order# –  user490735 Mar 24 '11 at 22:06
show 3 more comments

migrated from superuser.com Mar 24 '11 at 22:06

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are using 3 tables, but only one join. That will get you too many results. You will need two joins: probably somehow table Customers needs to be joined with OrderItems too.

Something like:

and o.customerId = c.id

Hence:

select b.title, o.order#, c.state
from customers c, orderitems o, books b
where o.customerId = c.id
and b.isbn = o.isbn (+)
order by title
share|improve this answer
add comment

I find it a lot easier to use ANSI joins if more than one table is involved when doing outer joins:

SELECT title, order#, STATE
FROM customers c 
   JOIN orderitems O ON o.customer_id = c.id
   LEFT JOIN books b ON b.isbn = o.isbn
ORDER BY title

(this is essentially the same query that Arjan posted, just with standard syntax)

Depending on your needs you might want to use a LEFT JOIN for orderitems as well e.g. if you also want customers that do not have orderitems

It is also good practice to use the table alias for the columns in the select list as well. Doing that makes the statement easier to understand (because you immediately know from which table which column comes) and it's more stable against changes.

share|improve this answer
    
With an on in the 3rd line too, I assume? –  Arjan Mar 25 '11 at 1:16
    
@Arjan: Thanks! Corrected –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 25 '11 at 7:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.