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I am using System.Windows.Forms but strangely enough don't have the ability to create them.

How can I get something like a javascript prompt dialog, without javascript?

MessageBox is nice, but there is no way for the user to enter an input.

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Can you post a code example of what you're trying to do? –  Andrew Cooper Mar 24 '11 at 23:55
    
What kind of input are you looking for, give little more details. CommonDialog look at the classes inheriting it do any of them look right for you? –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 24 '11 at 23:55
4  
It's funny how three people ask the OP to give more details and code samples but it's pretty clear what he means by "like a javascript prompt dialog". –  Camilo Martin Feb 5 '13 at 4:53
1  
Here are two examples, one basic and another with input validation: 1. basic - csharp-examples.net/inputbox 2. validation - csharp-examples.net/inputbox-class –  JasonM1 Apr 11 '13 at 13:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 85 down vote accepted

You need to create your own Prompt dialog. You could perhaps create a class for this.

public static class Prompt
{
    public static string ShowDialog(string text, string caption)
    {
        Form prompt = new Form();
        prompt.Width = 500;
        prompt.Height = 150;
        prompt.Text = caption;
        prompt.StartPosition = FormStartPosition.CenterScreen;
        Label textLabel = new Label() { Left = 50, Top=20, Text=text };
        TextBox textBox = new TextBox() { Left = 50, Top=50, Width=400 };
        Button confirmation = new Button() { Text = "Ok", Left=350, Width=100, Top=70 };
        confirmation.Click += (sender, e) => { prompt.Close(); };
        prompt.Controls.Add(textBox);
        prompt.Controls.Add(confirmation);
        prompt.Controls.Add(textLabel);
        prompt.AcceptButton = confirmation;
        prompt.ShowDialog();
        return textBox.Text;
    }
}

And calling it:

string promptValue = Prompt.ShowDialog("Test", "123");

Update Added default button (enter key) and initial focus based on comments and another question.

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1  
How would one extend this to A) have a cancel button and B) validate the text in the textfield in some way before returning? –  ewok Jun 26 '12 at 16:08
    
@ewok Just create a form, the Forms Designer will help you lay it out the way you want to. –  Camilo Martin Feb 5 '13 at 3:32
    
Nice and quick solution! I just added prompt.Height = 150; before the ShowDialog to get all controls on the window. –  werner Feb 22 '13 at 9:18
    
This doesn't address the user's question. This creates a Form object, and the user explicitly stated that they cannot do that. –  Sean Worle May 7 at 19:12
    
@SeanWorle I don't see where that is mentioned. –  Bas May 8 at 9:17

Add reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic and use this into your C# code:

string input = Microsoft.VisualBasic.Interaction.InputBox("Prompt", 
                       "Title", 
                       "Default", 
                       0, 
                       0);
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It's generally not a real good idea to import the VisualBasic libraries into C# programs (not because they won't work, but just for compatibility, style, and ability to upgrade), but you can call Microsoft.VisualBasic.Interaction.InputBox() to display the kind of box you're looking for.

If you can create a Windows.Forms object, that would be best, but you say you cannot do that.

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7  
Why is this not a good idea? What are the possible "compatibility" and "ability to upgrade" problems? I'll agree that "stylistically" speaking, most C# programmers would prefer not to use classes from a namespace called VisualBasic, but that's only in their head. There's no reality to that feeling. It would just as well be called the Microsoft.MakeMyLifeEasierWithAlreadyImplementedMethods namespace. –  Cody Gray May 19 '11 at 3:54
    
In general, the Microsoft.VisualBasic package is meant to simplify upgrading code from VB 6 only. Microsoft keeps threatening to permanently sunset VB (though this will probably never actually happen), so future support for this namespace is not guaranteed. Additionally, one of the advantages to .Net is supposed to be portability - the same code will run on any platform that has the .Net framework installed. Microsoft.VisualBasic, however, is not guaranteed to be available on any other platform (including, for what it's worth, .Net mobile, where it is not available at all). –  Sean Worle Jun 7 '11 at 15:40
7  
Incorrect. That's the Microsoft.VisualBasic.Compatibility sub-namespace, not the entire thing. Lots of "core" functionality is included in the Microsoft.VisualBasic namespace; it isn't going anywhere. Microsoft has threatened to "sunset" VB 6, not VB.NET. They've promised repeatedly that it's not going anywhere. Some people still don't seem to have figured out the difference... –  Cody Gray Jun 7 '11 at 15:41

There is no such thing natively in Windows Forms.

You have to create your own form for that or:

use the Microsoft.VisualBasic reference.

Inputbox is legacy code brought into .Net for VB6 compatibility - so i advise to not do this.

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+1 for pointing out that this is legacy code for VB6 compatibility. –  Pathachiever11 Feb 11 at 21:50

You will have to create a new Form for this, and then show it.

Some examples of creating a simple Input Box form can be found here : http://www.bing.com/search?setmkt=en-GB&q=C%23+input+box

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Bas Brekelmans's answer is very elegant in it's simplicity. But, I found that for an actual application a little more is needed such as:

  • Grow form appropriately when message text is too long.
  • Doesn't automatically popup in middle of screen.
  • Doesn't provide any validation of user input.

The class here handles these limitations: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/31315/Getting-User-Input-With-Dialogs-Part-1

I just downloaded source and copied InputBox.cs into my project.

Surprised there isn't something even better though... My only real complaint is it caption text doesn't support newlines in it since it uses a label control.

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Other way of doing this: Assuming that you have a TextBox input type, Create a Form, and have the textbox value as a public property.

public partial class TextPrompt : Form
{
    public string Value
    {
        get { return tbText.Text.Trim(); }
    }

    public TextPrompt(string promptInstructions)
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        lblPromptText.Text = promptInstructions;
    }

    private void BtnSubmitText_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Close();
    }

    private void TextPrompt_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        CenterToParent();
    }
}

In the main form, this will be the code:

var t = new TextPrompt(this, "Type the name of the settings file:");
t.ShowDialog()

;

This way, the code looks cleaner:

  1. If validation logic is added.
  2. If various other input types are added.
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Based on the work of Bas Brekelmans above, I have also created two derivations -> "input" dialogs that allow you to receive from the user both a text value and a boolean (TextBox and CheckBox):

public static class PromptForTextAndBoolean
{
    public static string ShowDialog(string caption, string text, string boolStr)
    {
        Form prompt = new Form();
        prompt.Width = 280;
        prompt.Height = 160;
        prompt.Text = caption;
        Label textLabel = new Label() { Left = 16, Top = 20, Width = 240, Text = text };
        TextBox textBox = new TextBox() { Left = 16, Top = 40, Width = 240, TabIndex = 0, TabStop = true };
        CheckBox ckbx = new CheckBox() { Left = 16, Top = 60, Width = 240, Text = boolStr };
        Button confirmation = new Button() { Text = "Okay!", Left = 16, Width = 80, Top = 88, TabIndex = 1, TabStop = true };
        confirmation.Click += (sender, e) => { prompt.Close(); };
        prompt.Controls.Add(textLabel);
        prompt.Controls.Add(textBox);
        prompt.Controls.Add(ckbx);
        prompt.Controls.Add(confirmation);
        prompt.AcceptButton = confirmation;
        prompt.StartPosition = FormStartPosition.CenterScreen;
        prompt.ShowDialog();
        return string.Format("{0};{1}", textBox.Text, ckbx.Checked.ToString());
    }
}

...and text along with a selection of one of multiple options (TextBox and ComboBox):

public static class PromptForTextAndSelection
{
    public static string ShowDialog(string caption, string text, string selStr)
    {
        Form prompt = new Form();
        prompt.Width = 280;
        prompt.Height = 160;
        prompt.Text = caption;
        Label textLabel = new Label() { Left = 16, Top = 20, Width = 240, Text = text };
        TextBox textBox = new TextBox() { Left = 16, Top = 40, Width = 240, TabIndex = 0, TabStop = true };
        Label selLabel = new Label() { Left = 16, Top = 66, Width = 88, Text = selStr };
        ComboBox cmbx = new ComboBox() { Left = 112, Top = 64, Width = 144 };
        cmbx.Items.Add("Dark Grey");
        cmbx.Items.Add("Orange");
        cmbx.Items.Add("None");
        Button confirmation = new Button() { Text = "In Ordnung!", Left = 16, Width = 80, Top = 88, TabIndex = 1, TabStop = true };
        confirmation.Click += (sender, e) => { prompt.Close(); };
        prompt.Controls.Add(textLabel);
        prompt.Controls.Add(textBox);
        prompt.Controls.Add(selLabel);
        prompt.Controls.Add(cmbx);
        prompt.Controls.Add(confirmation);
        prompt.AcceptButton = confirmation;
        prompt.StartPosition = FormStartPosition.CenterScreen;
        prompt.ShowDialog();
        return string.Format("{0};{1}", textBox.Text, cmbx.SelectedItem.ToString());
    }
}

Both require the same usings:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

Call them like so:

Call them like so:

PromptForTextAndBoolean.ShowDialog("Jazz", "What text should accompany the checkbox?", "Allow Scat Singing"); 

PromptForTextAndSelection.ShowDialog("Rock", "What should the name of the band be?", "Beret color to wear");
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