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Ok so here is the question. I am trying to insert a variable into my query that is pre-defined. However it is not working. The query works if I just give it a value, but when I insert a variable into it, it fails. help?

$connection = new mysqli('localhost', 'user', 'pass', 'db'); 

$username = "test";

if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {
    printf("Connect failed: %s\n", mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}

if ($result = $connection->query("INSERT INTO users (username, password, email, firstName, lastName, createDate) VALUES ('".$username."', 'test', 'test', 'test', 'test', 'test')")){

  echo "success";
  $result->close();

}
else {
  echo "error";
}

$connection->close();
?>

If I replace $username with any value, it works.. Am I missing something here?

share|improve this question
2  
$username = test; is an obvious syntax error, I assume this is a typo? Also use backticks (`) to escape your database and column names. There are a bunch of MySQL reserved keywords. Most notorious of those is desc which is often used as an abbreviation of "description" but is also a mysql keyword (Short for descending, used in ORDER BY). – Carpetsmoker Mar 25 '11 at 0:03
    
yes, this was a typo – Chris Mar 25 '11 at 0:04
    
Unfortunately it's just an E_NOTICE in PHP as long it would be a valid name for a constant. PHP automatically treats undefined constants as constants containing their name as a string.. so test == 'test' will cause an E_NOTICE but the comparison is true.. – ThiefMaster Mar 25 '11 at 0:05
    
Still not sure why the query fails on me when I try to use a variable.. – Chris Mar 25 '11 at 0:07
4  
Instead of using echo "error";, maybe try using mysqli->error() and that may shed some light ... – Carpetsmoker Mar 25 '11 at 0:08

Hello this is for anyone who might still need accomplish what was asked in original question.

A reason why someone possibly might want to not use prepared statements--from: http://www.php.net/manual/en/mysqli.quickstart.statements.php

"Using a prepared statement is not always the most efficient way of executing a statement. A prepared statement executed only once causes more client-server round-trips than a non-prepared statement."

//you will want to clean variables properly before inserting into db
$username = "MyName";
$password = "hashedPasswordc5Uj$3s";

$q = "INSERT INTO `users`(`username`, `password`) VALUES ('".$username."', '".$password."')";

if (!$dbc->query($q)) {
    echo "INSERT failed: (" . $dbc->errno . ") " . $dbc->error;
}    
echo "Newest user id = ",$dbc->insert_id;

Cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
-1 because you didnt properly escape the variables. I know they were hardcoded and thus could be insured of not needing escaping but that situation is not the norm in an actual application. – prodigitalson Mar 8 '13 at 22:40
1  
This code has a huge security hole. If $username or $password are maliciously formed, an attacker can do serious damage to the database and/or extract information from it. – doug65536 Aug 14 '13 at 8:29
3  
The question isn't about data cleansing or sql injections - it's a very simple bit of code to help understand what's going on. The dev can add code to prevent sql injection himself... very helpful bit of code. Thanks. – Blind Trevor Jul 21 '14 at 16:23

Since ther was some discussion above i thought id provide the following examples in pdo and mysqli for comparison:

MySQLi:

$connection = new mysqli('localhost', 'user', 'pass', 'db'); 

$username = "test";

if ($connection->errno) {
    printf("Connect failed: %s\n", $connection->error);
    exit();
}

$username = 'test';

$stmt = $connection->prepare("INSERT INTO users (username, password, email, firstName, lastName, createDate) VALUES (?,'test', 'test', 'test', 'test', 'test')");

$stmt->bind_param('s', $username_value);
$username_value = $username; // not we could simply define $username_value = 'test' here

if ($result = $stmt->execute()){

  echo "success";
  $stmt->free_result();

}
else {
  echo "error";
}

$connection->close();

PDO:

try {

$db = new PDO($dsn, $user, $pass);
$username = 'test';

$stmt = $db->prepare("INSERT INTO users (username, password, email, firstName, lastName, createDate) VALUES (?,'test', 'test', 'test', 'test', 'test')");

$stmt->execute(array($username));

echo 'Success';
}
catch(PDOException $e)
{
  echo $e->getMessage();
}
share|improve this answer

In this case, looking at the context of your question it is better to assign the username variable with some data like $username=$_POST['username'];

This might help...otherwise avoid the double quotes and simply put down $username

share|improve this answer

The best answer to it is we must assign the variable we want into another variable. For example:

$username = $_POST['username'];

$a = $username;

mysqli_query("INSERT INTO tablename (username,test, test, test) VALUES ('$a', 'test', 'test');
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't use this code. It is a textbook case of sql injection. Using this code will effectively give anyone complete access (read and write) to your entire database. – Magmatic Apr 4 at 15:57

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