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What am I doing wrong with the syntax of these If/Else statements I'm pretty sure it has something to do wiht my curly bracket placement. All of the examples in my book only contain really primitive/simple examples (not to say that this code isn't simple; b/c it is). I guess my general question would also be how do you separate these two separate statements. When I execute it seems that the two separate functions are blending together.

  //
    tens = rand / 10;
    if (tens =  2){
            cout << "twenty ";
    else if (tens = 3)
            cout << "thirty ";
    else if (tens = 4)
            cout << "forty ";
    else if (tens = 5)
            cout << "fifty ";
    else if (tens = 6)
            cout << "sixty ";
    else if (tens = 7)
            cout << "seventy ";
    else if (tens = 8)
            cout << "eighty ";
    else if (tens = 9)
            cout << "ninety ";
    }

    //
    ones = rand % 10;
    if (ones =  0){
            cout << "\n";
    else if (ones = 1)
            cout << "one\n";
    else if (ones = 2)
            cout << "two\n";
    else if (ones = 3)
            cout << "three\n";
    else if (ones = 4)
            cout << "four\n";
    else if (ones = 5)
            cout << "five\n";
    else if (ones = 6)
            cout << "six\n";
    else if (ones = 7)
            cout << "seven\n";
    else if (ones = 8)
            cout << "eight\n";
    else if (ones = 9)
            cout << "nine\n";
    }
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5  
Turn on your compiler warnings. –  GManNickG Mar 25 '11 at 2:34
    
Post your real code. What you've shown won't compile, since there is no if matched with the first else. –  Ben Voigt Mar 25 '11 at 5:13
    
For this particular problem, if-else isn't even required. See my solution! –  Nawaz Mar 25 '11 at 5:14
    
this code does not compile, and is full-choked of errors. I recommend a good tutorial to begin with, really... –  Matthieu M. Mar 25 '11 at 7:41

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think, for this particular problem if-else isn't even required!

I would rather recommend this solution:

const char *stens[] = {"", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty",
                               "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninty"};
const char *sones[] = {"", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", 
                               "six", "seven", "eigth", "nine"};

//make sure  0<= rand <= 99
 cout << stens[ rand / 10 ] << " " << sones[ rand % 10 ] << endl;

Online Demo : http://www.ideone.com/K7HxS

As for the problem you're facing with if-else, you're using assignment operator, rather than equality, as everyone already have pointed out.

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2  
+1: exactly the approach I was contemplating posting myself (though you probably should have another array for ten through nineteen). –  Tony D Mar 25 '11 at 6:58
    
@Tony: Yeah. I thought this solution gives enough hint as to how to implement what else is needed, and how to improve further! –  Nawaz Mar 25 '11 at 7:02
1  
it definitely indeed. Cheers. –  Tony D Mar 25 '11 at 7:04

A single equals sign is an assignment, rather than a test for equality.

You should be using ones == N for some number N.

It also seems like you're not using the braces ({ and }) correctly, your if statement ought to look like this:

tens = rand / 10;
if (tens == 2){
        cout << "twenty ";
}else if (tens == 3){

Note the brace preceding the else and after the 3).

Also, I'd recommend using a switch statement in this scenario, it might lead to some easier to read and more manageable code:

tens = rand / 10;
switch(tens){
  case 2: cout << "twenty "; break;
  case 3: cout << "thirty "; break;
  case 4: cout << "fourty "; break;
  // ...
  case 9: cout << "ninety "; break;
}
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Make note of the missing {} as well, and this is the right answer. –  Ken White Mar 25 '11 at 2:24
    
@Ken -- nice catch. –  Mark Elliot Mar 25 '11 at 2:26
    
+1. Nice edit. :) We were both within the 5 minutes, too. –  Ken White Mar 25 '11 at 2:37

use "==" instead of "='. "=" is assignment operator; whereas "==" logical equals.

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Yes, you are using the curly brace in a wrong way. Do it like this:

if (tens ==  2)
{
        // your commands
}
else
{
        // your commands
}

And please use "==" operator for equal comparing, not "=".

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Plus you need to use the == instead of = –  Rasika Mar 25 '11 at 2:22
    
@Rasika: oh yes, I just realized it after the answer is posted. Edited, thanks Rasika –  Hoàng Long Mar 25 '11 at 2:24

Yes you need to close the bracket after the first if.

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why dont you use SWITCH CASE , think you have to case calculated value into int ie

ones = int (rand % 10);
ones = int (rand / 10);

example of switch case

switch (x) {
  case 1:
    cout << "x is 1";
    break;
  case 2:
    cout << "x is 2";
    break;
  default:
    cout << "value of x unknown";
  }
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ALso, the brace right after your "if" should be matched by one right before the first "else"

if (something) {
   something
} else if (something) {
   something
}
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The assignment operator = will generally always return true as it returns the success of an assignment of value. The equality operator == is what your after. It will test the equivalency of two values.

In addition the if statement is either followed by a single statement or code block. In your example you lack the terminating brackets.

// This is the assignment operator with a single statement.
if ( a = b )
    cout << "I am always true!" << endl;

// This is the equality operator with a code block.
if ( a == b ) {
    cout << "I am sometimes true!" << endl;
} else {
    cout << "I am more likely to be true." << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
the assignment won't always be true (hint: play with the value of b) –  Matthieu M. Mar 25 '11 at 7:40
    
@Matthieu I have tried many values in this code. I don't understand what you mean. –  Ben Campbell Mar 26 '11 at 0:44
    
if b is 0, a = b will be evaluated to 0 which is equivalent to false in C++. Look at the output of your code on ideone, there is no output for 0 ;) –  Matthieu M. Mar 26 '11 at 11:33
    
@Matthieu I'll be a monkey's uncle, you are correct. Is there any logic or documentation describing this attribute? I don't understand why zero would return 0. –  Ben Campbell Mar 26 '11 at 19:55
    
it's because of the operator= signature, if you overload it for an object, then the signature is Foo& Foo::operator=(Foo). It returns the objects to which you assigned (normally) so that you can chain the assignments: a = b = c = 0; will initialized all a, b and c to 0 at once thanks to this. Therefore you're partly right: most of the times, it'll return true, since all non 0 values are true, but this has nothing to do with signalling the success of the assignment (in which case it would return a boolean), it's just that integers are implicitly convertible to booleans –  Matthieu M. Mar 27 '11 at 11:40

You have to close the curly braces after each and every if or else if clause like

tens = rand / 10;
if (tens =  2) {
        cout << "twenty "; }
else if (tens = 3) {
        cout << "thirty ";}
else if (tens = 4)
        cout << "forty "; }
else if (tens = 5) {
        cout << "fifty "; }
else if (tens = 6) {
        cout << "sixty "; }
else if (tens = 7) {
        cout << "seventy "; }
else if (tens = 8) {
        cout << "eighty "; }
else if (tens = 9) {
        cout << "ninety "; }
//
ones = rand % 10;
if (ones =  0) {
        cout << "\n"; }
else if (ones = 1) {
        cout << "one\n"; }
else if (ones = 2) {
        cout << "two\n"; }
else if (ones = 3) {
        cout << "three\n"; }
else if (ones = 4) {
        cout << "four\n"; }
else if (ones = 5) {
        cout << "five\n"; }
else if (ones = 6) {
        cout << "six\n"; }
else if (ones = 7) {
        cout << "seven\n"; }
else if (ones = 8) {
        cout << "eight\n"; }
else if (ones = 9) {
        cout << "nine\n"; }
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