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Can't get my head around this, is there any way to check if a method was called internally? By this I mean a traceback to check if it was called by $this and not a pointer to the instance. Kind of like the concept of private function but only function is public?

<?php

class Foo {
    public function check () {
        /*
        if invoked by $this (internally)
            return true
        else
            return false
        */
    }

    public function callCheck () {
        /* returns true because its called by $this */
        return $this->check();
    }
}

$bar = new Foo;
// this should return false because we are calling it from an instance
$bar->check();
// where as this will return true
$bar->callCheck();

?>

Maybe this is undo-able but I really need it for my project at university? Anyone come across a solution or knows how I would identify a solution.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
4  
Seems like you should rather rework your interfaces. A function should not react differently depending on how it's called. If you're looking for public/private behavior, why not use it? –  deceze Mar 25 '11 at 3:42
4  
Why do you want to know the difference? It seems likely that you're trying to solve a problem with the wrong solution. –  Jonah Mar 25 '11 at 3:43
    
@deceze @Jonah I'm trying to merge objects together, BUT keeping them apart. So I can programmatically extend objects rather than define it in the interface. So if a object has a protected function, the object that merged it can call the protected function, but obviously protected means you can call it from an instance? do you get me??? –  chris Mar 25 '11 at 4:10
1  
Maybe you should try something less awkward and use already established design patterns instead for whatever actual problem you're trying to solve. –  deceze Mar 25 '11 at 4:16
    
Adapter pattern link –  chris Mar 25 '11 at 4:22

3 Answers 3

Below solution does not work.


You could use debug_backtrace but it will be slow. I really advise you find a different way to solve the problem you are trying to overcome.

<?php
public function check() {
    $trace = debug_backtrace();
    if ($trace[1]['class'] == 'MyClassName') {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
the problem with the backtrace work around is that $bar class_name is equal to $this class_name so how does the method know who's calling it when the classes are equal. –  chris Mar 25 '11 at 4:06
    
You are right. I had thought class would be calling class, not the called class. Makes sense now that I think about it though. –  MitMaro Mar 25 '11 at 4:13
    
The instance and class are the same you see, the class does not inherit or extend interfaces –  chris Mar 25 '11 at 4:18

if you there is a call $bar->callCheck(); control exits from function check();

first it go to callCheck() then after it goest to check() and return from there

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1  
unsure of what you working at, could you example? –  chris Mar 25 '11 at 4:07

debug_backtrace(); should work. place the debug_backtrace(); inside check() method.

do this:

$t = debug_backtrace(); var_dump($t);

from here you should check $t['function'] and $t['class'], combine those 2 , you should find out is a call, external or internal.

here is out put from my machine, php version is 5.2.14.

array(1) {
  [0]=>
  array(7) {
    ["file"]=>
    string(15) "C:\php\test.php"
    ["line"]=>
    int(24)
    ["function"]=>
    string(5) "check"
    ["class"]=>
    string(3) "Foo"
    ["object"]=>
    object(Foo)#1 (0) {
    }
    ["type"]=>
    string(2) "->"
    ["args"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
  }
}
array(2) {
  [0]=>
  array(7) {
    ["file"]=>
    string(15) "C:\php\test.php"
    ["line"]=>
    int(18)
    ["function"]=>
    string(5) "check"
    ["class"]=>
    string(3) "Foo"
    ["object"]=>
    object(Foo)#1 (0) {
    }
    ["type"]=>
    string(2) "->"
    ["args"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
  }
  [1]=>
  array(7) {
    ["file"]=>
    string(15) "C:\php\test.php"
    ["line"]=>
    int(26)
    ["function"]=>
    string(9) "callCheck"
    ["class"]=>
    string(3) "Foo"
    ["object"]=>
    object(Foo)#1 (0) {
    }
    ["type"]=>
    string(2) "->"
    ["args"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have tried this but it kept returning true? Maybe you could help me out in the selection algorithm? I want to go back just 1 stack in the traceback not 2. The point I'm trying to make is who called check(); NOT who called callCheck(); then called check(); I can't find a solid way to do this, I'm looking into runkit extension maybe I'll play about with that and see if I can achieve the same goal in a different approach. Cheers! –  chris Mar 25 '11 at 12:32
    
in array(1), there is only one element, which indicate, "check()" is called by itself, that is an external call. in Array(2), there are 2 sub arrays inside, and check() is top one, which indicate the "check()" was called by an other function, check that function we found out the function comes from same class which "check()" belongs to , so this means, the "check()" was be called internal –  anru Mar 26 '11 at 10:15
    
so Algorithm is: if there is one element in an array, it is a external call. if more than one, check the next element , if the next element has same class as the "check()" , it is an internal call, if the class diff, external call. –  anru Mar 26 '11 at 10:24

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