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Is there a standard idiom for getting a set of each unique pair of elements in a given Collection?

For our purposes, the set of (a,b) is equivalent to (b,a), and thus only one should appear in the resulting set.

I can see how one might construct such a set using a Pair class that implements hashCode and equals() based on the paired elements, but I'm wondering if there isn't already a more standard way to generate such a set.

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Are you talking about the set of all subsets of size 2? –  Stephen C Mar 25 '11 at 5:31
    
Yes, all subsets of size 2. –  Caffeine Coma Mar 25 '11 at 14:51
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2 Answers

Like you said, a Pair class with hashcode & equals implemented and placed in a HashSet would accomplish what you are looking for. I am not aware of a JDK data structure that does this natively.

If you wanted to generalize it a little further, you could make a Tuple, Tuple<T1,T2> and declare a HashSet based on that Tuple, HashSet<Tuple<T1,T2>>. Then create a more generic Equals/Hashcode method for the tuple types.

Here is an example implementation:

final class Pair<A, B> {
    private final A _first;
    private final B _second;

    public Pair(A first, B second) {
        _first = first;
        _second = second;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        int hashFirst = _first != null ? _first.hashCode() : 0;
        int hashSecond = _second != null ? _second.hashCode() : 0;
        return (hashFirst + hashSecond) * hashSecond + hashFirst;
    }

    @Override
    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public boolean equals(Object other) {
        if (other instanceof Pair) {
            Pair otherPair = (Pair) other;
            return this._first == otherPair._first //
                    || (this._first != null //
                            && otherPair._first != null && this._first.equals(otherPair._first)) //

                    && this._second == otherPair._second //
                    || (this._second != null //
                            && otherPair._second != null && this._second.equals(otherPair._second));
        }
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "(" + _first + ", " + _second + ")"; 
    }

    public A getFirst() {
        return _first;
    }

    public B getSecond() {
        return _second;
    }
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Said OP, "the set of (a,b) is equivalent to (b,a)..." this doesn't seem to provide that. –  Kevin Bourrillion Mar 26 '11 at 17:20
1  
@Kevin: change hashCode and equals to treat (a,b) equivalent to (b,a), and you are done. (You might think about extending from AbstractSet for the "pairs".) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 26 '11 at 19:04
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I have created a "lazy" implementation for you, a bit more general (i.e. can list subsets of any size).

It is lazy in the sense of not needing all elements of the original set (or all subsets) in memory at the same time, but it is not really efficient: invoking next() on the iterator still can mean iterating over the original set k-1 times (if k is the subset-size wanted) - luckily not every time, most times we only need a single next() on one iterator (at least when k is small compared to n, the size of the base set). And of course we still need to have the k elements of the subset in memory.

We also have to assume that all iterators use the same order, as long as the underlying set does not change (and we don't want it to change while one of our iterations is in progress). This would be much easier if the Iterator interface allowed cloning an iterator, i.e. starting a second iterator at the point one iterator currently is. (We implement this now with the scrollTo method.) For sorted Maps this should be much easier (await an update there).

package de.fencing_game.paul.examples;

import java.util.*;

/**
 * An unmodifiable set of all subsets of a given size of a given (finite) set.
 *
 * Inspired by http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5428417/idiom-for-getting-unique-pairs-of-collection-elements-in-java
 */
public class FiniteSubSets<X>
    extends AbstractSet<Set<X>> {

    private final Set<X> baseSet;
    private final int subSize;

    /**
     * creates a set of all subsets of a given size of a given set.
     * 
     * @param baseSet the set whose subsets should be in this set.
     * For this to work properly, the baseSet's iterators should iterate
     * every time in the same order, as long as one iteration of this set
     * is in progress.
     *
     * The baseSet does not need to be immutable, but it should not change
     * while an iteration of this set is in progress.
     * @param subSetSize
     */
    public FiniteSubSets(Set<X> baseSet, int subSetSize) {
        this.baseSet = baseSet;
        this.subSize = subSetSize;
    }

    /**
     * calculates the size of this set.
     *
     * This is the binomial coefficient.
     */
    public int size() {
        int baseSize = baseSet.size();
        long size = binomialCoefficient(baseSize, subSize);
        return (int)Math.min(size, Integer.MAX_VALUE);
    }

    public Iterator<Set<X>> iterator() {
        if(subSize == 0) {
            // our IteratorImpl does not work for k == 0.
            return Collections.singleton(Collections.<X>emptySet()).iterator();
        }
        return new IteratorImpl();
    }

    /**
     * checks if some object is in this set.
     *
     * This implementation is optimized compared to 
     * the implementation from AbstractSet.
     */
    public boolean contains(Object o) {
        return o instanceof Set && 
            ((Set)o).size() == subSize &&
            baseSet.containsAll((Set)o);
    }


    /**
     * The implementation of our iterator.
     */
    private class IteratorImpl implements Iterator<Set<X>> {

        /**
         * A stack of iterators over the base set.
         * We only ever manipulate the top one, the ones below only
         * after the top one came to its end.
         * The stack should be always full, except in the constructor or
         * inside the {@link #step} method.
         */
        private Deque<Iterator<X>> stack = new ArrayDeque<Iterator<X>>(subSize);
        /**
         * a linked list maintaining the current state of the iteration, i.e.
         * the next subset. It is null when there is no next subset, but
         * otherwise it should have always full length subSize (except when
         * inside step method or constructor).
         */
        private Node current;

        /**
         * constructor to create the stack of iterators and initial
         * node.
         */
        IteratorImpl() {
            try {
                for(int i = 0; i < subSize; i++) {
                    initOneIterator();
                }
            }
            catch(NoSuchElementException ex) {
                current = null;
            }
            //      System.err.println("IteratorImpl() End, current: " + current);
        }

        /**
         * initializes one level of iterator and node.
         * Only called from the constructor.
         */
        private void initOneIterator() {
            Iterator<X> it = baseSet.iterator();
            if(current != null) {
                scrollTo(it, current.element);
            }

            X element = it.next();
            current = new Node(current, element);
            stack.push(it);
        }

        /**
         * gets the next element from the set (i.e. the next
         * subset of the base set).
         */
        public Set<X> next() {
            if(current == null) {
                throw new NoSuchElementException();
            }
            Set<X> result = new SubSetImpl(current);
            step();
            return result;
        }

        /**
         * returns true if there are more elements.
         */
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return current != null;
        }

        /** throws an exception. */
        public void remove() {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }


        /**
         * Steps the iterator on the top of the stack to the
         * next element, and store this in {@link #current}.
         *
         * If this iterator is already the end, we recursively
         * step the iterator to the next element.
         *
         * If there are no more subsets at all, we set {@link #current}
         * to null.
         */
        void step() {
            Iterator<X> lastIt = stack.peek();
            current = current.next;
            while(!lastIt.hasNext()) {
                if(current == null) {
                    // no more elements in the first level iterator
                    // ==> no more subsets at all.
                    return;
                }

                // last iterator has no more elements
                // step iterator before and recreate last iterator.
                stack.pop();
                assert current != null;
                step();
                if(current == null) {
                    // after recursive call ==> at end of iteration.
                    return;
                }
                assert current != null;

                // new iterator at the top level
                lastIt = baseSet.iterator();
                if(!scrollTo(lastIt, current.element)) {
                    // Element not available anymore => some problem occured
                    current = null;
                    throw new ConcurrentModificationException
                        ("Element " + current.element + " not found!");
                }
                stack.push(lastIt);
            }
            // now we know the top iterator has more elements
            // ==> put the next one in `current`.

            X lastElement = lastIt.next();
            current = new Node(current, lastElement);

        }  // step()

    }

    /**
     * helper method which scrolls an iterator to some element.
     * @return true if the element was found, false if we came
     *    to the end of the iterator without finding the element.
     */
    private static <Y> boolean scrollTo(Iterator<? extends Y> it, Y element) {
        while(it.hasNext()) {
            Y itEl = it.next();
            if(itEl.equals(element)) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    /**
     * implementation of our subsets.
     * These sets are really immutable (not only unmodifiable).
     *
     * We implement them with a simple linked list of nodes.
     */
    private class SubSetImpl extends AbstractSet<X>
    {
        private final Node node;

        SubSetImpl(Node n) {
            this.node = n;
        }

        /**
         * the size of this set.
         */
        public int size() {
            return subSize;
        }

        /**
         * an iterator over our linked list.
         */
        public Iterator<X> iterator() {
            return new Iterator<X>() {
                private Node current = SubSetImpl.this.node;
                public X next() {
                    if(current == null) {
                        throw new NoSuchElementException();
                    }
                    X result = current.element;
                    current = current.next;
                    return result;
                }
                public boolean hasNext() {
                    return current != null;
                }
                public void remove() {
                    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
                }
            };
        }
    }

    /**
     * A simple immutable node class, used to implement our iterator and
     * the sets created by them.
     *
     * Two "neighbouring" subsets (i.e. which
     * only differ by the first element) share most of the linked list,
     * differing only in the first node.
     */
    private class Node {
        Node(Node n, X e) {
            this.next = n;
            this.element = e;
        }

        final X element;
        final Node next;

        public String toString() {
            return "[" + element + "]==>" + next;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Calculates the binomial coefficient B(n,k), i.e.
     * the number of subsets of size k in a set of size n.
     *
     * The algorithm is taken from the <a href="http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binomialkoeffizient#Algorithmus_zur_effizienten_Berechnung">german wikipedia article</a>.
     */
    private static long binomialCoefficient(int n, int k) {
        if(k < 0 || n < k ) {
            return 0;
        }
        final int n_minus_k = n - k;
        if (k > n/2) {
            return binomialCoefficient(n, n_minus_k);
        }
        long prod = 1;
        for(int i = 1; i <= k; i++) {
            prod = prod * (n_minus_k + i) / i;
        }
        return prod;
    }


    /**
     * Demonstrating test method. We print all subsets (sorted by size) of
     * a set created from the command line parameters, or an example set, if
     * there are no parameters.
     */
    public static void main(String[] params) {
        Set<String> baseSet =
            new HashSet<String>(params.length == 0 ?
                                Arrays.asList("Hello", "World", "this",
                                              "is", "a", "Test"):
                                Arrays.asList(params));


        System.out.println("baseSet: " + baseSet);

        for(int i = 0; i <= baseSet.size()+1; i++) {
            Set<Set<String>> pSet = new FiniteSubSets<String>(baseSet, i);
            System.out.println("------");
            System.out.println("subsets of size "+i+":");
            int count = 0;
            for(Set<String> ss : pSet) {
                System.out.println("    " +  ss);
                count++;
            }
            System.out.println("in total: " + count + ", " + pSet.size());
        }
    }


}

As always for my bigger code examples here, this is findable in my github repository stackoverflow-examples, too.

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