Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am aware of two ways to read a .properties file:

1- System.getProperties.load(Inputstream for .properties file);

2- Creating a new Properties object and then calling load(Inputstream for .properties file);

In first approach, are we going to store values of .properties file in the System object. Is it utilizing more resources?

Would like to know which is the best way to do it or apart from above two ways, if there is any other best way, please let me know.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

Depends on what the properties file represents. If it represents system properties which needs to override/supply some default system properties, then go for the first approach. But if it represents application-specific properties (which is more often the usual case), then go for the second approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Totally agree. System properties pertain to the system obviously, and anything else pertains to the application. The latter is summarized as Application Configuration, which is echoed by something like the Apache Configuration project commons.apache.org/configuration/howto_properties.html. The other kind of properties or ResourceBundle loading is for internationalization, which still resides with the latter. –  hisdrewness Mar 25 '11 at 4:56
add comment

IMO, it is a BAD idea to load application properties into the System properties object. If someone puts bogus property values into the file you are loading, this could cause all sorts of obscure failures. For example, setting "java.home" to a bogus value will cause JavaMail to fail, and setting one of the "*.separator" properties could cause all sorts of things to behave strangely.

If your application really needs to "overlay" the system properties, then it would be better to do this:

    Properties props = new Properties(System.getProperties());
    props.load(someInputStream);

If it doesn't, then just load the Properties as follows:

    Properties props = new Properties();
    props.load(someInputStream);

If for some reason you need to override values in the System Properties object itself, then you should do it much more carefully / selectively.

share|improve this answer
add comment

we will read properties files using the URl...

 Properties props = new Properties();
 try
 {
     java.net.URL url = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader().getResource(fileName);
    java.net.URL url2 = ClassLoader.getSystemResource(fileName);
     props.load(url.openStream());
 }
 catch (FileNotFoundException e)
 {
     // TODO Auto-generated catch block
     e.printStackTrace();
 }
 catch (IOException e)
 {
     // TODO Auto-generated catch block
     e.printStackTrace();
 }
 return props;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.