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I'm fairly new to OOP PHP and am having trouble with getting a couple of classes to work nicely together. I'm using a database abstract class to do all the grunt work of talking to the database and that is all fine, and I can extend it with another class with the methods to make specific actions. The database class has an include_once to read in the config settings for the database.

Where I am confused is if I need to use a 2nd class to access the database on the same page, I need to reference a 2nd config file that has the same settings.

Example: I have a products class for a site I'm building and it is working fine. I wanted to use a 2nd class to control the actual shopping cart side of things, but when I try and extend the database class with the Cart class the page fails unless I override which config file it needs to reference.

Why do I need separate config files for each class and is there a way around this? It seems silly that I should need as many config files as there are classes that interact with the database.

Thanks for your help. Jon

* Extra Info * Sorry guys, Everything is in the same database. Here is some sample code.

All config files are like this:

$DB_HOST = "localhost"; $DB_USER = "abcdef"; $DB_PASS = "123456"; $DB_DATABASE = "newdb_name";

then I override the config file which it needs to pull in but doing this in the sub classes:

function __construct()
  {
    $this->conffile = "db_conf1.php";
    parent::__construct();
  }

and change the $this->conffile for each new sub class.

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You might need to elaborate on what is in your config file. Are your products and shopping cart tables not in the same database? Normally one config file would be sufficient. –  takteek Mar 25 '11 at 4:49
    
Post some example code for what you mean it's hard to guess what you're doing. –  canuckistani Mar 25 '11 at 4:50

2 Answers 2

I'm using a database abstract class to do all the grunt work of talking to the database and that is all fine, and I can extend it with another class with the methods to make specific actions. The database class has an include_once to read in the config settings for the database.

This is a bad design. If you need to use two of these classes together in the same script, you're going to end up w--

Where I am confused is if I need to use a 2nd class to access the database on the same page

Phew, you got it already.

You generally only want one database connection per page. This generally means only one database object. You have two good options in PHP to deal with this.

The first has a fancy name: "Dependency Injection." In DI, your objects require some external resource to work. They receive this resource during construction.

In other words, you pass your database object in the constructor.

class Foo {
    protected $db;
    public function __construct($other, $args, $db) {
        $this->db = $db;
    }
}

This way, you still get the convenience of referencing the database from within your object without having to make it too intermingled.

The other option also has a fancy name: the "Registry Pattern." Registries act as gateways to "well-known" classes and instances. They're basically look-up tables, allowing you to make your program depend on data that will be present in the Registry rather than hard-coding class names or using globals.

Or, in other words, it's just a global hash with a special name.

Doing it right requires a class. This blog post from 2009 is an interesting starting point because it deals exactly with the problem of what to do with a database adapter. I'll omit example code here, as the blog post does a decent job of explaining itself.

There is a third option, of course, and it's the worst, yet most common in PHP land: assigning the database object to a global, then referencing the global as needed. It's quick, it's dirty, it usually works... but can make maintenance difficult, and can make automated testing impossible to do correctly. Don't do it.

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thanks for the info. I'll digest this and give it a go and see if I run into any more dramas. Thanks for your help. –  Jon May Mar 25 '11 at 6:05

You should remove the dependency on the config file from the database class and pass the variables you need into the database constructor e.g.,

class Database {

    public function __construct($host, $user, $pass, $dbname, $port) {
        // create connection
    }

    //...
}

Put the info for both your databases into one config file and create your database objects like this:

include_once 'config.php';

$db1 = new Database($host1, $user1, $pass1, $dbname1, $port1);
$db2 = new Database($host2, $user2, $pass2, $dbname2, $port2);
share|improve this answer
    
or use a key value pair ` class Database { priavet $host = 'localhost'; priavet $socket = 3305; //or what ever /... public function __construct($params) { $this->host = (isset($params['host'])? $params['host']: $this->host); } //... }` –  Kumar Mar 25 '11 at 5:04

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