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 def generator():
     nums = ['09', '98', '87', '76', '65', '54', '43']
     s_chars = ['*', '&', '^', '%', '$', '#', '@',]

     data = open("list.txt", "w")
     for c in s_chars:
        for n in nums:
           data.write(c + n)
     data.close()

I would like to add a newline after every "c + n". I know this is a newb question, but I am at a loss trying to fix this.

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1  
Can you please add a sample how you want the output to look? It's not exactly clear where you want to add the newlines. –  Jan Hudec Mar 25 '11 at 6:05

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Change

data.write(c + n)

to

data.write("%s%s\n" % (c, n))
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I knew I would feel stupid after seeing the answer. Thanks a lot. :) –  user457188 Mar 25 '11 at 6:08
    
This is complicated, compared to a simple print, which is designed to do just what the original poster asked. –  EOL Mar 25 '11 at 14:55
    
@EOL: So what. That doesn't make it wrong. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 25 '11 at 14:57
1  
@EOL: I disagree that print is the "obvious" way here. In order to use print with a file handle under Python 2.x, you have to know the redirect operator >> which never gets used in any other place in the language. The print-chevron is just syntactic sugar for write() anyways. file.write() is designed for getting your (simple) data into a file, irrespective of those data's contents. In Python 3, I could perhaps agree with you. –  Josh Caswell Mar 26 '11 at 1:15
1  
Don't know what you mean by "lighter". I do see and cede your point about legibility, however; that's a good way to look at it. –  Josh Caswell Mar 27 '11 at 17:32

A properly-placed data.write('\n') will handle that. Just indent it appropriately for the loop you want to punctuate.

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As other answers gave already pointed out, you can do it by appending a '\n' to c+n or by using the format string "%s%s\n".

Just as a matter of interest, I think it would be more pythonic to use a list comprehension instead of two nested loops:

data.write("\n".join("%s%s"%(n,c) for c in s_chars for n in nums))
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Won't this construct the entire string in memory before writing it out? –  detly Mar 25 '11 at 6:32
    
@detly: Yes it does. In this case the string generated should be short enough. It should be somewhat faster as long as there is enough memory. –  MAK Mar 25 '11 at 6:34

Change

data.write(c+n)

to

data.write(c+n+'\n')
share|improve this answer

Python's print is the standard "print with newline" function.

Therefore, you can directly do, if you use Python 2.x:

print  >> data, c+n

If you use Python 3.x:

print(c+n, file=data)
share|improve this answer

This one works for me

with open(fname,'wb') as f:
    for row in var:
        f.write(repr(row)+'\n')
share|improve this answer
def generator():
     nums = ['09', '98', '87', '76', '65', '54', '43']
     s_chars = ['*', '&', '^', '%', '$', '#', '@',]

     data = open("list.txt", "w")
     for c in s_chars:
        for n in nums:
           data.write(c + n + "\n")
     data.close()

OR

def generator():
     nums = ['09', '98', '87', '76', '65', '54', '43']
     s_chars = ['*', '&', '^', '%', '$', '#', '@',]

     data = open("list.txt", "w")
     for c in s_chars:
        for n in nums:
           data.write(c + n)
        data.write("\n")
     data.close()

depending on what you want.

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In the previously reply, I have made a wrong answer because I have misunderstood the requirements, please ignore it.

I think you can use join to simplify the inner loop

data = open("list.txt", "w")
for c in s_chars:
    data.write("%s%s\n" % (c, c.join(nums)))
data.close()
share|improve this answer
    
zip() is not equivalent to two nested loops… –  EOL Mar 25 '11 at 7:50
    
Sorry, I have misunderstood the requirement. I have corrected my answer. –  hzm Mar 25 '11 at 8:30

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