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Consider the following arbitrary figure generated in MATLAB as an example. The basic idea is that I have a contour plot and I want to showcase selected slices from it in subplots on the right. Is there an equivalent of subplot in mma?

The work around that I have right now is to have just the contour plot with the slices and the arrows and the two slice-plots separately and then put them together in latex. However, I'd like to be able to do this within mma. How do I go about doing this?

An idea that I had is to generate a the contour plot with a full vertical & half horizontal aspect ratio, the two plots with half vertical & half horizontal aspect ratio, and then use GraphicsGrid to align them up. But this still gave me the plots as a list, not a composite figure. Is this the only way or is there a nicer, more elegant way of doing it?

enter image description here

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I know that Multipanel in LevelScheme can probably let you do what you want - but I don't have much experience with it and the examples in the docs are fairly sparse. I've already pasted one of the examples into this SO answer, so have a look there and see what you think!


Here's my attempt with GraphicsGrid. The thing that Multipanel lets you do but GraphicsGrid doesn't is to let you use varying Column/Row sizes. This means that I struggled to get the arrows drawn in programmatically, and resorted to hand drawing them using the "Drawing Tools" panel ( :D )

With[{yslice1 = .5, yslice2 = -.8},
 GraphicsGrid[
  {{DensityPlot[Sin[15 x y], {x, -1, 1}, {y, -1, 1}, 
     ColorFunction -> "PlumColors", AspectRatio -> 2,
     Epilog -> {Dashed, White, Line[{{-1, yslice1}, {1, yslice1}}], 
       Line[{{-1, yslice2}, {1, yslice2}}]}],
    Plot[Sin[15 x yslice1], {x, -1, 1}, Axes -> False, Frame -> True]},
   {SpanFromAbove,
    Plot[Sin[15 x yslice2], {x, -1, 1}, Axes -> False, 
     Frame -> True]}},
  Spacings -> {Scaled[0.2], Scaled[0.0]}]]

enter image description here


Edit:

Here's the same thing using LevelScheme, note that the frames line up. It should be possible to add arrows - since LevelScheme has lots of new arrow directives - but I'll leave that as a homework problem!

<< "LevelScheme`"
{yslice1 = .5, yslice2 = -.8};
Figure[{
  SetOptions[Multipanel, 
   ShowTickLabels -> {True, False, False, True}, Background -> Wheat,
   PanelLetterFontSize -> 10, Margin -> {{40, 40}, {40, 0}}],
  Multipanel[{{0, 1}, {0, 1}}, {2, 2},
   XPlotRanges -> {-1, 1}, YPlotRanges -> {-1, 1},
   XFrameLabels -> textit["x"], YFrameLabels -> textit["y"],
   TickFontSize -> 10, XFrameTicks -> LinTicks[-1, 1, .5, 4], 
   YFrameTicks -> LinTicks[-1, 1, .5, 4],
   BufferL -> 1.5, BufferB -> 3, Order -> Vertical,
   XPanelSizes -> {1, 1}, XGapSizes -> 0.25, YGapSizes -> 0.2],
  FigurePanel[{1, 2}], 
  RawGraphics[
   Plot[Sin[15 x yslice1], {x, -1, 1}, Axes -> False, Frame -> True]],
  FigurePanel[{2, 2}], 
  RawGraphics[
   Plot[Sin[15 x yslice2], {x, -1, 1}, Axes -> False, Frame -> True]],
  FigurePanel[{2, 1}, PanelAdjustments -> {{0, 0}, {0, +1.2}}],
  RawGraphics[
   DensityPlot[Sin[15 x y], {x, -1, 1}, {y, -1, 1}, 
    ColorFunction -> "PlumColors", AspectRatio -> 2],
   Graphics[{Dashed, Thick, White, 
     Line[{{-1, yslice1}, {1, yslice1}}], 
     Line[{{-1, yslice2}, {1, yslice2}}]}]]},
 PlotRange -> {{0, 1}, {0, 1}}, ImageSize -> 2*72*{5, 3}
 ]

scheming

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I just had a quick look at the matlab subplot syntax - it looks similar to the levelscheme setup... but then again both look unfamiliar to me! –  Simon Mar 25 '11 at 7:48
    
that looks fantastic. Thanks for the tip on levelscheme. I'll check that out too. –  user564376 Mar 25 '11 at 16:36
1  
@d'o-o'b: It's not that great - note that the frames don't line up properly because GraphicsGrid and friends treat a graphics object as a whole. Give me a sec and I'll post the levelscheme version which doesn't have this problem. –  Simon Mar 25 '11 at 23:48
    
thanks Simon. I was poking around with LevelScheme and it's great. This does look much nicer than the previous one. –  user564376 Mar 26 '11 at 0:50
2  
@d'o-o'b, LevelScheme is great for this sort of thing. One thing to pay attention to, though, is that it is very procedural, and each statement influences the ones that come after, but not before. For instance, FigurePanel[{...}] states that the following graphics are within that particular panel, and that stays that way until the next FigurePanel. Takes some time to get used to it, but you can easily craft publication quality graphics using it. Also, check out its tick marks interface, much more sane than the default. –  rcollyer Mar 26 '11 at 2:45

Re the OPs comment about GraphicsGrid, you can use FullGraphics@GraphicsGrid@{...} to get a single graphics object out. This is necessary to get copy as PDF to work also.

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+1 Never seen FullGraphics before, despite it being "New in 2"! –  Simon Mar 26 '11 at 3:11
    
I overlooked that part of the OP's question. Good thing you picked it up. –  Mr.Wizard Mar 26 '11 at 12:27

Here is a first pass at making Simon's solution dynamic. The arrows are hard coded for this particular image. Later I shall try to implement them more generally.

dp1 = DensityPlot[Sin[15 x y], {x, -1, 1}, {y, -1, 1}, 
   ColorFunction -> "PlumColors", AspectRatio -> 2, PlotPoints -> 30];
Manipulate[
 Show[
  GraphicsGrid[{{dp1 ~Append~
        (Epilog -> {Dashed, White, 
         Line[{{-1, yslice1}, {1, yslice1}}], 
         Line[{{-1, yslice2}, {1, yslice2}}]}), 
     Plot[Sin[15 x yslice1], {x, -1, 1}, Axes -> False, 
      Frame -> True]}, {SpanFromAbove, 
     Plot[Sin[15 x yslice2], {x, -1, 1}, Axes -> False, 
      Frame -> True]}}, Spacings -> {Scaled[0.2], Scaled[0.0]}],
  Graphics[{Red, {Arrowheads[Large],
     Arrow[{{380, Rescale[yslice1, {-1, 1}, {-646, -46}]}, {440, -170}}], 
     Arrow[{{380, Rescale[yslice2, {-1, 1}, {-646, -46}]}, {440, -530}}]
     }}],
  ImageSize -> 600
 ],
 {{yslice1, 0.5, "Slice 1"}, -1, 1},
 {{yslice2, -0.8, "Slice 2"}, -1, 1}
]

Here is a slightly different method that puts the arrows inside Epilog, which links their position to the left plot, perhaps easier to use.

dp1 = DensityPlot[Sin[15 x y], {x, -1, 1}, {y, -1, 1}, 
   ColorFunction -> "PlumColors", AspectRatio -> 2, PlotPoints -> 30, 
   PlotRangeClipping -> False, 
   ImagePadding -> {{Automatic, 100}, {Automatic, Automatic}}];
Manipulate[
 Show[
  GraphicsGrid[{{dp1~
      Append~(Epilog -> {{Dashed, White, 
          Line[{{-1, yslice1}, {1, yslice1}}], 
          Line[{{-1, yslice2}, {1, yslice2}}]}, {Red, 
          Arrowheads[Large],
          Arrow[{{1, yslice1}, {1.7, 0.88}}], 
          Arrow[{{1, yslice2}, {1.7, -0.9}}]
          }}), 
     Plot[Sin[15 x yslice1], {x, -1, 1}, Axes -> False, 
      Frame -> True]}, {SpanFromAbove, 
     Plot[Sin[15 x yslice2], {x, -1, 1}, Axes -> False, 
      Frame -> True]}}, Spacings -> {Scaled[-0.2], Scaled[0.0]}],
  ImageSize -> 600
  ],
 {{yslice1, 0.5, "Slice 1"}, -1, 1},
 {{yslice2, -0.8, "Slice 2"}, -1, 1}
 ]
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. The use of Rescale to go between the different coords is good. –  Simon Mar 25 '11 at 11:31
    
+ another 1 for the edit! –  Simon Mar 26 '11 at 0:12

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