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How do I get the number of days between two dates in JavaScript? For example, given two dates in input boxes:

<input id="first" value="1/1/2000"/>
<input id="second" value="1/1/2001"/>

<script>
  alert(datediff("day", first, second)); // what goes here?
</script>
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@Micheal Haren: have you marked the most optimal answer as your answer? :) –  naveen Jun 27 '11 at 19:15
    
@naveen yeah...? The others are great, too –  Michael Haren Jun 27 '11 at 19:50
    
@Micheal Haren: merely clarifying as you have a great reputation. i liked some's better :) cannot fathom why it has not been marked? parseDate is a better alternative called Date.parse right? –  naveen Jun 27 '11 at 19:53
1  
@naveen most of these are great answers. For my purpose (two years ago), @Miles had the best answer. @Some's is great but I didn't need nearly that much detail. This was just for a simple validator –  Michael Haren Jun 27 '11 at 20:20
2  
Since jQuery does have no tools for dates, I will remove it from the question (it's not used in any of the answers either). –  Bergi May 14 '13 at 17:56

9 Answers 9

up vote 71 down vote accepted
function parseDate(str) {
    var mdy = str.split('/')
    return new Date(mdy[2], mdy[0]-1, mdy[1]);
}

function daydiff(first, second) {
    return (second-first)/(1000*60*60*24);
}

alert(daydiff(parseDate($('#first').val()), parseDate($('#second').val())));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Miles, works great! –  Michael Haren Feb 13 '09 at 2:40
10  
This method doesn't work properly if there's a daylight savings jump between the two dates. However, it seems that you can use "Math.floor" to get around this problem. Therefore, the "daydiff" function should return "Math.floor((second-first)/(1000*60*60*24));". –  Steve Harrison Apr 7 '09 at 9:56
19  
Days can have fewer than 24 hours. Using Math.floor() might drop these days. Math.round() would be safer. Mind you I still wouldn't be 100% sure. Working with calendars is so complicated that I'd feel nervous unless I was using a library written by an expert. –  Rich Dougherty Apr 7 '12 at 22:25
    
the return statement in daydiff looks like its missing a semi-colon. –  Mark Rogers May 21 at 17:07

The easiest way to get the difference between two dates:

var diff =  Math.floor(( Date.parse(str2) - Date.parse(str1) ) / 86400000);

You get the difference days (or NaN if one or both could not be parsed). The parse date gived the result in milliseconds and to get it by day you have to divided it by 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000

If you want it divided by days, hours, minutes, seconds and milliseconds:

function dateDiff( str1, str2 ) {
    var diff = Date.parse( str2 ) - Date.parse( str1 ); 
    return isNaN( diff ) ? NaN : {
    	diff : diff,
    	ms : Math.floor( diff            % 1000 ),
    	s  : Math.floor( diff /     1000 %   60 ),
    	m  : Math.floor( diff /    60000 %   60 ),
    	h  : Math.floor( diff /  3600000 %   24 ),
    	d  : Math.floor( diff / 86400000        )
    };
}

Here is my refactored version of James version:

function mydiff(date1,date2,interval) {
    var second=1000, minute=second*60, hour=minute*60, day=hour*24, week=day*7;
    date1 = new Date(date1);
    date2 = new Date(date2);
    var timediff = date2 - date1;
    if (isNaN(timediff)) return NaN;
    switch (interval) {
        case "years": return date2.getFullYear() - date1.getFullYear();
        case "months": return (
            ( date2.getFullYear() * 12 + date2.getMonth() )
            -
            ( date1.getFullYear() * 12 + date1.getMonth() )
        );
        case "weeks"  : return Math.floor(timediff / week);
        case "days"   : return Math.floor(timediff / day); 
        case "hours"  : return Math.floor(timediff / hour); 
        case "minutes": return Math.floor(timediff / minute);
        case "seconds": return Math.floor(timediff / second);
        default: return undefined;
    }
}
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7  
Be careful using Math.floor(). Days can have fewer than 24 hours. –  Rich Dougherty Apr 7 '12 at 22:29
4  
@Rich Dougherty: Yes, your are right. With daylight savings a day can be between 23-25 hours. With historical dates 22-26 hours. Also, a minute can be between 59-61 seconds. –  some Apr 8 '12 at 10:13
    
@RichDougherty this is very interesting. At first I was using the simple script from the accepted answer as I never thought of the special cases you mention in your comments all over here. Do you know of any solution available out there in JavaScript? –  Boro Jun 22 '12 at 14:18

As of this writing, only one of the other answers correctly handles DST (daylight saving time) transitions. Here are the results on a system located in California:

                                        1/1/2013- 3/10/2013- 11/3/2013-
User       Formula                      2/1/2013  3/11/2013  11/4/2013  Result
---------  ---------------------------  --------  ---------  ---------  ---------
Miles                   (d2 - d1) / N   31        0.9583333  1.0416666  Incorrect
some         Math.floor((d2 - d1) / N)  31        0          1          Incorrect
fuentesjr    Math.round((d2 - d1) / N)  31        1          1          Correct
toloco     Math.ceiling((d2 - d1) / N)  31        1          2          Incorrect

N = 86400000

Although Math.round returns the correct results, I think it's somewhat clunky. Instead, by explicitly accounting for changes to the UTC offset when DST begins or ends, we can use exact arithmetic:

function treatAsUTC(date) {
    var result = new Date(date);
    result.setMinutes(result.getMinutes() - result.getTimezoneOffset());
    return result;
}

function daysBetween(startDate, endDate) {
    var millisecondsPerDay = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
    return (treatAsUTC(endDate) - treatAsUTC(startDate)) / millisecondsPerDay;
}

alert(daysBetween($('#first').val(), $('#second').val()));

Explanation

JavaScript date calculations are tricky because Date objects store times internally in UTC, not local time. For example, 3/10/2013 12:00 AM Pacific Standard Time (UTC-08:00) is stored as 3/10/2013 8:00 AM UTC, and 3/11/2013 12:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-07:00) is stored as 3/11/2013 7:00 AM UTC. On this day, midnight to midnight local time is only 23 hours in UTC!

Although a day in local time can have more or less than 24 hours, a day in UTC is always exactly 24 hours.1 The daysBetween method shown above takes advantage of this fact by first calling treatAsUTC to adjust both local times to midnight UTC, before subtracting and dividing.

1. JavaScript ignores leap seconds.

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I would go ahead and grab this small utility and in it you will find functions to this for you. Here's a short example:

    	<script type="text/javascript" src="date.js"></script>
    	<script type="text/javascript">
    		var minutes = 1000*60;
    		var hours = minutes*60;
    		var days = hours*24;

    		var foo_date1 = getDateFromFormat("02/10/2009", "M/d/y");
    		var foo_date2 = getDateFromFormat("02/12/2009", "M/d/y");

    		var diff_date = Math.round((foo_date2 - foo_date1)/days);
    		alert("Diff date is: " + diff_date );
    	</script>
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This little script is great! –  RichW Jul 13 '10 at 15:28
    
this answer handles DST correctly –  Atharva Johri Dec 3 '13 at 10:44

I recommend using the moment.js library (http://momentjs.com/docs/#/displaying/difference/). It handles daylight savings time correctly and in general is great to work with.

Example:

var start = moment("2013-11-04");
var end = moment("2013-11-03");
start.diff(end, "days")
1
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What about using formatDate from DatePicker widget? You could use it to convert the dates in timestamp format (milliseconds since 01/01/1970) and then do a simple subtraction.

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Date values in JS are datetime values.

So, direct date computations are inconsistent:

(2013-11-05 00:00:00) - (2013-11-04 10:10:10) < 1 day

for example we need to convert de 2nd date:

(2013-11-05 00:00:00) - (2013-11-04 00:00:00) = 1 day

the method could be truncate the mills in both dates:

start = Math.floor( date1.getTime() / (3600*24*1000)); //days as integer from..
end   = Math.floor( date2.getTime() / (3600*24*1000)); //days as integer from..
daysDiff = end - start; // exact dates
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I think the solutions aren't correct 100% I would use ceil instead of floor, round will work but it isn't the right operation.

function dateDiff( str1, str2 ) {
    var diff = Date.parse( str2 ) - Date.parse( str1 ); 
    return isNaN( diff ) ? NaN : {
        diff : diff,
        ms : Math.ceil( diff            % 1000 ),
        s  : Math.ceil( diff /     1000 %   60 ),
        m  : Math.ceil( diff /    60000 %   60 ),
        h  : Math.ceil( diff /  3600000 %   24 ),
        d  : Math.ceil( diff / 86400000        )
    };
}
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2  
Days can have more than 24 hours and minutes can have more than 60 seconds. Using Math.ceil() would overcount in these cases. –  Rich Dougherty Apr 7 '12 at 22:28

I found this question when I want do some calculate on two date, but the date have hours and minutes value, I modified @michael-liu 's answer to fit my requirement, and it passed my test.

diff days 2012-12-31 23:00 and 2013-01-01 01:00 should equal 1. (2 hour) diff days 2012-12-31 01:00 and 2013-01-01 23:00 should equal 1. (46 hour)

function treatAsUTC(date) {
    var result = new Date(date);
    result.setMinutes(result.getMinutes() - result.getTimezoneOffset());
    return result;
}

var millisecondsPerDay = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
function diffDays(startDate, endDate) {
    return Math.floor(treatAsUTC(endDate) / millisecondsPerDay) - Math.floor(treatAsUTC(startDate) / millisecondsPerDay);
}
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