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I've learned C and C++ in Borland's Turbo C++ IDE, the 16-Bit version with that old blue screen background, in which I started off building console programs for Windows. Now that Windows Vista and 7 doesn't support that IDE to be run in full-screen mode, I'm looking for such similar IDE (not necessarily from Borland), that comes with GCC, and doesn't need much learning to use if one has already worked with Turbo C. So is there any free GCC IDE that works with Windows 7? I'll not be using it for developing Windows applications, since I need it to practice on data structure console programs.

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simplest is to use visual studio express –  David Heffernan Mar 25 '11 at 6:53

9 Answers 9

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Turbo C++ is very old, and the concepts and philosophies of IDE design as (well as the language C++ compilers are compiling) have developed much further since.

You might try Code::Blocks or Eclipse, but I wouldn't expect a transition as smooth as going to the next version of Turbo C++. (Which weren't as smooth either, BTW. The latest of that serious, BCB 5.0 was quite different to the old DOS TC environments, and even that got abandoned later in favor of the very different C++ Builder IDE.)

BTW; does it have to be GCC? Visual C++ Express is free also, the VC compiler isn't worse than GCC, and the IDE is quite good.

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What is this "Ecplipse" of which you speak, stranger? :-) –  paxdiablo Mar 25 '11 at 6:55
    
@pax: A tpyo, what else? :) Thanks for pointing it out. (And I should probably add that "tpyo" was a deliberate joke.) –  sbi Mar 25 '11 at 6:56
    
I haven't used Visual C++ Express, but does one need to rely on .NET namespace in order to get simple Hello World program?? Also, I have some data structure of programs written in Turbo C (.C and .CPP files), so shall I expect them to run in Visual C++ without any modifications? –  Kush Mar 25 '11 at 6:57
    
@Kush: No. Visual C++ Express (and Visual Studio in general) can be used to compile non-.NET C++ programs. I have a Visual Studio installation that has no .NET development components and I can use that to compile native C++ programs just fine. With respect to the Turbo C files, you may need to modify them somewhat since in general newer C++ compilers have better compliance to the C++ standard than older C++ compilers like Turbo C++. –  In silico Mar 25 '11 at 6:59
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@Kush: Every C++ toolchain I've come across also supports C (though they might not make it obvious how). MSVC certainly does - just make sure the source file ends in .c. I don't know how well the current VC++ Express supports the pre-standard iostream.h or the non-standard conio.h- I'd guess not very well, if at all. However, I'd also guess you'd be in a similar boat with a GCC-based IDE as well. –  Michael Burr Mar 25 '11 at 7:40

An open source IDE that runs on Windows that should get more mention than it currently does is QtCreator. While it's tailored to working with the Qt framework, it works just fine for non-Qt-based C++ work (though you won't get much help in the form of UI wizards unless you're using Qt for the UI).

It's much lighter than Eclipse/CDT and I find it easier to use (though I normally use Visual Studio over either QtCreator or Eclipse/CDT).

General information/marketing for QtCreator: http://qt.nokia.com/products/developer-tools/developer-tools

Nokia provides a Windows package that includes the MinGW GCC compiler. Go to the download page and select the "Qt Creator 2.1 Binary for Windows" link (I have no idea why Nokia doesn't link to the download from the info page): http://qt.nokia.com/downloads

Of course if you just want a free C++ IDE for Windows, and don't really care if it's GCC or MSVC based, I'd suggest getting VC++ Express: http://www.microsoft.com/express/Windows/

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There are a few C++ IDEs with many features.

  1. Bloodshed Dev C++
  2. NetBeans C C++ IDE
  3. Eclipse CDT
  4. CodeBlocks

Also take a look at Cygwin which provides a linux like environment for Windows. If you are making console applications, using a good shell won't hurt.

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You can use codeblocks: http://www.codeblocks.org/ It is not a console IDE but you can build console programs and watch the output in a window.

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Code::Blocks is definitely a better option for C++ development that Eclipse. It is faster, lighter, and is not a java adapt to c++ IDE. –  fljx Apr 12 '11 at 12:09

If you're looking for a beer-free IDE, just download Visual Studio Express from Microsoft - it's not gcc behind the covers but it is tuned very well for Windows.

If you're after a speech-free one, Code::Blocks is the best I've ever seen. The larger setup package for Windows includes the backing gcc compiler and gdb debugger.

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The best solution if you are using windows is CODEBLOCKS-EP(Education Portal). You can find it at http://codeblocks.codecutter.org/ Once you find it, I would personally recommend the "Zip (CodeBlocks-EP.zip)" file download. Hope this helps.

Happy Coding

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I can suggest you Eclipse ID with CDT (you can download bundle from http://eclipse.org) + MinGW compiler tool. Or You can use the Code::Blocks IDE.

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I like Bloodshed Dev-C++, but I don't know if it runs on W7.

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I suggest using CodeLite opensource cross platform IDE for the C/C++ programming languages: It works great on almost all Operating Systems

Windows XP/7 and 8

Debian / Ubuntu

Fedora / OpenSUSE

Mac OSX 10.5.8

http://codelite.org/

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