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Thank you for everyone's help!! This is what I went with.

3/30/2011-

import java.util.Arrays; public class Deck {

String [] cards = {"AH", "2H", "3H", "4H", "5H", "6H", "7H", "8H",

"9H", "10H", "JH", "QH", "KH", "AC", "2C", "3C", "4C", "5C", "6C", "7C", "8C", "9C", "10C", "JC", "QC", "KC", "AD", "2D", "3D", "4D", "5D", "6D", "7D", "8D", "9D", "10D", "JD", "QD", "KD", "AS", "2S", "3S", "4S", "5S", "6S", "7S", "8S", "9S", "10S", "JS", "QS", "KS", };

Deck(){

}


public void shuffle()
{
    String [] temp = new String[52];
    for ( int i = 0; i < 26; i++){
        temp [2*i] = cards[i];
        temp [2*i+1]= cards[i+26];
     }

    cards = temp;

 }



@Override
public String toString() {

    String cards1 = "";
    for ( int i = 0; i < cards.length; i++){
        cards1 += cards[i] + " ";
        if ((i+1)%13==0){
            cards1 += "\n";
        }
    }
                return cards1;

}


public boolean equals(Deck other) {
        for (int i=0; i<cards.length; ++i) {
            if (!this.cards[i].equals(other.cards[i]))

return false; } return true; }

}

Hi, I need some assistance with my lab hw.

B. It is said that if a deck of cards is given perfect shuffles enough times, it will return to its original order. A perfect shuffle is done by splitting the deck exactly in half and interleaving the cards from the two halves; that is, the first card is from the first half, the second from the second half, the third from the first half and so on.

I need to include the following methods. -Deck() constructor that creates an unshuffled deck. -A shuffle() method that does a perfect shuffle. -A toString() method that print the deck -An equals(Deck aDeck) method that compares itself with he given deck and returns true if all the cards in both decks are in the same order and false otherwise

I think I am having problems with the constructor part. I don't know how to create a correct constructor for string arrays. I have three java books, and none of them touched on it.

public class DeckTester {

/**
 * @param args the command line arguments
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Deck d1 = new Deck();

    System.out.println(d1);

    }
}      public class Deck {

String [] cards = {"AH", "2H", "3H", "4H", "5H", "6H", "7H", "8H",

"9H", "10H", "JH", "QH", "KH", "AC", "2C", "3C", "4C", "5C", "6C", "7C", "8C", "9C", "10C", "JC", "QC", "KC", "AD", "2D", "3D", "4D", "5D", "6D", "7D", "8D", "9D", "10D", "JD", "QD", "KD", "AS", "2S", "3S", "4S", "5S", "6S", "7S", "8S", "9S", "10S", "JS", "QS", "KS", };

Deck(){ cards = new String []{}; }

     public void shuffle()
     {
     for ( int i = 0; i< cards.length; i++){
         String temp = cards[ i ]; // swap
         cards[ i ] = cards[ i+25 ]; // the
         cards[ i+25 ] = temp; // cards
     }
 }

}
share|improve this question
    
everybody else had two separate arrays, one for the suits and one for the numbers...but he wants us to do it this way... –  CuriousStudent Mar 25 '11 at 8:41
    
You don't need to initialize your cards element again in the Deck constructor, it's already been initialized by your assignment above it.... what problem are you having? –  forsvarir Mar 25 '11 at 8:43
    
How do I create an object with those values? –  CuriousStudent Mar 25 '11 at 8:46
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One could assume that the cards will always be the same. So you could have a constant that defines the set of cards available.

Your constructor then simply allocates memory and copies the constant array to this member variable.

public class Deck {
  // static final defines a constant valid for all the objects of that class.
  // this will allow us to initiase our array in a clean way.
  // You will notice that constants are always named with capital letters. 
  private static final String[] ORDERED_CARDS = new String[] {
      "AH", "2H", "3H", "4H", "5H", "6H", "7H", "8H",
      "9H", "10H", "JH"
      // etc.
    };

  // This is the member variable that holds the cards for our Deck objects
  private String[] cards;

  // The constructor allocates memory with the new keyword
  // Then it uses a function from the Java library to copy from one array to the other
  public Deck() {
    cards = new String[ORDERED_CARDS.length];
    System.arraycopy(ORDERED_CARDS, 0, cards, 0, ORDERED_CARDS.length);
  }

  // Using Google "java shuffle array" you'll find how to do it in one line using the 
  // Java library. There are other ways to do it, depending on which shuffle type 
  // you need. You could as well implement your own algorithm. The class to generate 
  // random numbers is called Random (part of the Java library)
  public void shuffle() {
    assert(cards!=null);
    Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(cards));
  }

  // The toString method shows how to iterate over an array or a collection using the 
  // "for-each" loop. We use a StringBuffer to build a string with the resulting card 
  // list. The final keyword says that this variable will not be re-allocated anywhere
  // else during this method. This avoids mistakes in long methods and also allows the
  // Java compiler to optimize your code
  public String toString() {
    final StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
    for (String card : cards) {
      sb.append(card);
      sb.append(", ");
    }
    return sb.toString();
  }

  // The equals method shows how to iterate over an array or a collection using the 
  // "for" loop. 
  public boolean equals(Deck other) {
    if (other==null) return false;

    // assert is used to ensure that a Deck will always have cards. If not, the program 
    // will throw an Exception. This is good practise when you write classes to assert 
    // that you don't get values that should not be possible.
    assert(other.cards!=null);

    // Decks can only be equal if they have the same number of cards
    if (other.cards.length != this.cards.length) return false;

    final int cardCount = this.cards.length;
    for (int i=0; i<cardCount; ++i) {
      // Always compare strings using the equals method, not ==
      if (!this.cards[i].equals(other.cards[i])) return false;
    }

    // If we reach this point, then we have equal objects
    return true;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but i haven't learn most of the stuff you used :), it is a little advance for me lol –  CuriousStudent Mar 25 '11 at 9:04
    
I have added comments to help you understand what I did. –  MarvinLabs Mar 25 '11 at 9:10
    
You're missing [] on the declaration of your constant. –  wds Mar 25 '11 at 9:20
    
Hi, how come it I received this error code? incompatible types found : java.lang.String[] required: java.lang.String private static final String ORDERED_CARDS = new String[] { –  CuriousStudent Mar 25 '11 at 9:21
    
See wds comment. I have corrected the mistake. –  MarvinLabs Mar 25 '11 at 9:22
show 8 more comments

This does what I believe you want. I left out the shuffling part to not give the whole answer away :)

public class Deck {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Deck deck = new Deck();
        System.out.println(deck);

        String original = deck.toString();
        while (true) {
            deck.shuffle();
            System.out.println(deck);
            if (deck.toString().equals(original)) {
                return;
            }
        }
    }

    String[] cards = { "AH", "2H", "3H", "4H", "5H", "6H", "7H", "8H", "9H",
            "10H", "JH", "QH", "KH", "AC", "2C", "3C", "4C", "5C", "6C", "7C",
            "8C", "9C", "10C", "JC", "QC", "KC", "AD", "2D", "3D", "4D", "5D",
            "6D", "7D", "8D", "9D", "10D", "JD", "QD", "KD", "AS", "2S", "3S",
            "4S", "5S", "6S", "7S", "8S", "9S", "10S", "JS", "QS", "KS", };

    public void shuffle() {
        // omitted
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        for (String card : cards) {
            builder.append(card + " ");
        }
        return builder.toString();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, i will take a look at this –  CuriousStudent Mar 25 '11 at 9:05
add comment

EDIT: I don't believe in making the code any more complicated than it needs to be.

public class Deck {
    private final String[] cards = "AH,2H,3H,4H,5H,6H,7H,8H,9H,10H,JH,QH,KH,AC,2C,3C,4C,5C,6C,7C,8C,9C,10C,JC,QC,KC,AD,2D,3D,4D,5D,6D,7D,8D,9D,10D,JD,QD,KD,AS,2S,3S,4S,5S,6S,7S,8S,9S,10S,JS,QS,KS".split(",");
    // the default constructor will do everything, nothing needs to be added.

    public void shuffle() {
        Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(cards));
    }

    public String toString() {
        return Arrays.toString(cards);
    }

    // equals must extend equals(Object) or it won't do what you thing.
    public boolean equals(Object other) {
        return other instanceof Deck 
            && Arrays.equals(cards, ((Deck) other).cards);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But you're not declaring it in the constructor now. –  RoflcoptrException Mar 25 '11 at 8:53
    
@Roflcopter, There is no need for the constructor. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 25 '11 at 8:57
    
I dont think so too, but in the questions it is mentioned: 'Deck() constructor that creates an unshuffled deck' –  RoflcoptrException Mar 25 '11 at 8:59
    
Hm, I still don't understand it clearly, do you guys know any sites that directly addresses this? or is pretty similar to it? –  CuriousStudent Mar 25 '11 at 9:08
    
The default constructor still would. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Mar 25 '11 at 9:08
show 3 more comments

You're constructor should look like this:

public class Deck {

private String[] cards = new String[52];

       public Deck() {
         cards[0] = "AH";
         cards[1] = "2H";
         cards[2] = "3H";
         cards[3] = "4H";
         cards[4] = "5H";
         cards[5] = "6H";

            //and so on

       }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You're constructing a local cards variable here, that's hiding the class member, so when the constructor completes, the class members cards element won't have changed. –  forsvarir Mar 25 '11 at 8:43
    
It might help if the constructor initialises a class attribute instead of a variable with limited scope :-) –  rsp Mar 25 '11 at 8:44
    
Ah ok now I understand what he wants.. Thanks –  anon Mar 25 '11 at 8:44
    
But how do I use the instance variable? –  CuriousStudent Mar 25 '11 at 8:45
    
I think cards needs to be a field. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Mar 25 '11 at 8:47
show 11 more comments

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