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I have an ordered map like so:

{:a 1 :b 2 :c 3}

: and given a list of orderings like :

[:c :a]

: I would like to find the simplest way possible to get :

{c: 3 :a 1}

: Does anyone know how to do this?

Update: (defn asort [amap order] (conj {} (select-keys amap order)))

(asort {:a 1 :b 2 :c 3} [:c :a] )

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a simple way of doing that:

(defn asort [amap order]
 (conj {} (select-keys amap order)))

resulting in:

clojure.core> (asort {:a 1 :b 2 :c 3} [:c :a])
{:c 3, :a 1}
clojure.core> (asort {:a 1 :b 2 :c 3} [:a :c])
{:a 1, :c 3}
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brilliant, worked first time! –  Zubair Mar 25 '11 at 9:58
7  
Unfortunately, this will fail as soon as the map gets big enough to be turned into a proper hash table. Try an example with 50 entries and you'll see what I mean. –  pmdj Mar 25 '11 at 10:27
2  
Specific example: (asort (apply sorted-map (interleave (range 0 50) (range 0 50))) (range 32 0 -1)) should generate { 32 32 31 31 ... 1 1 } but on my machine that's not the case at all. –  pmdj Mar 25 '11 at 10:34
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I would probably convert the vector of orderings into a hash map to quickly look up the ordering index, resulting in something like this:

{ :c 0  :a 1 }

There are a few ways to do that automatically from a seq/vector (e.g. map with range, then reduce into a {} with assoc). Bind the result of that (or the literal map above) to a local (with let), let's call it order-map.

Then filter the entries of the original map (m) to only include the ones included in the ordering:

(select-keys m order)

And put the result of that filtered expression back into a new sorted map (using sorted-map-by), using a comparator function like the following:

(fn [a b] (compare (order-map a) (order-map b)))

Note that if you didn't actually need it as a map, and a sequence will do, you can use sort-by with a key function that uses the same order-map.

Putting this together, you get:

(defn asort [m order]
  (let [order-map (apply hash-map (interleave order (range)))]
    (conj
      (sorted-map-by #(compare (order-map %1) (order-map %2))) ; empty map with the desired ordering
      (select-keys m order))))

And:

=> (asort (apply sorted-map (interleave (range 0 50) (range 0 50))) (range 32 0 -1))
{32 32, 31 31, 30 30, 29 29, 28 28, 27 27, 26 26, 25 25, 24 24, 23 23, 22 22, 21 21, 20 20, 19 19, 18 18, 17 17, 16 16, 15 15, 14 14, 13 13, 12 12, 11 11, 10 10, 9 9, 8 8, 7 7, 6 6, 5 5, 4 4, 3 3, 2 2, 1 1}
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I tried that but I get "order-map" not defined. Which version of clojure did you try it on? –  Zubair Mar 25 '11 at 9:37
    
Sorry if that wasn't clear - you need to bind the resulting ordering map to something like order-map. Updated the explanation a bit. You need to do something like (let [order-map { :c 0 :a 1 }] and then do the rest inside that let-block. –  pmdj Mar 25 '11 at 10:10
    
ah, thanks. will this version work when there are more than 50 entries? –  Zubair Mar 25 '11 at 17:33
    
Yes, this version is correct for all cases to the best of my knowledge. As far as I can tell, the cut-off point for maps becoming hash-tables is currently 32 entries, hence the example. The fact that the version with (conj {} (select-keys ...)) seems to work at all is an implementation detail that may well change in future versions of Clojure. As far as I can tell, maps are basically lists and use linear search up until the cut-off point of 32 entries, which is why they maintain ordering. Beyond that, they're implemented as hash-trees. –  pmdj Mar 26 '11 at 11:01
1  
@pmjordan The cutoff is actually 10 entries as it happens, currently. It can look like 32 because of the way integers hash as map keys, but if you use something other than small integers it's fairly clear that the change happens at 10. –  amalloy Dec 10 '11 at 8:13
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