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Hi I'm wondering how you would check if an object at a specific location in a List is equal to something.

I have 3 subclasses of "Ship", they are called "Enemy", "Enemy2", "Player" All of them are saved in a List that I call "Ships"

I'm wondering how you would check in a list that the item at index is of one of the above. It's pretty hard to explain, I'll try to explain in code.

for (int i = 0; i < Game1.Ships.Count; i++)
    {
    if(Game1.Ships.ElementAt(i) == "Enemy")
        Enemy e = Game1.Ships.ElementAt(i);
        if (this.collisionBox.Intersects(e.collisionBox))
        {
            e.Destroy(false);
            //Execute Destory(bool).
        }
    }
    else
        i++;
        //Skip to next item.

That is roughly what I'm trying to do, obviously I'd need to check that It's not a Player. And I'd also have to do the same loop for Enemy2. Observe though that "Ship" does not have a Destroy(bool) by default, it's only exsists on "Enemy" & "Enemy2".

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Independent of your question, the else i++; is going to cause you problems, as it will result in some ships being skipped. Is this intended? –  dahlbyk Mar 25 '11 at 12:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

just use is:

for (int i = 0; i < Game1.Ships.Count; i++)
{
    if(Game1.Ships.ElementAt(i) is Enemy)
    {
        Enemy e = (Enemy)Game1.Ships.ElementAt(i);
        if (this.collisionBox.Intersects(e.collisionBox))
        {
            e.Destroy(false);
            //Execute Destory(bool).
        }
    }
    else
        i++;
        //Skip to next item.
}
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@Daniel I get the following error on "Enemy e = Game1.Ships.ElementAt(i);" "Cannot implicitly convert type 'ProjectGame1.Ship' to 'ProjectGame1.Enemy'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)" If i do that way –  PeppeJ Mar 25 '11 at 12:00
    
@user669415: Sorry, missed that line. Fixed my answer. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '11 at 12:01
    
@Daniel I see how you are thinking, and it does work, but exactly how does the (Enemy) before the Game1.Ships.ElementAt(i) make a difference?? –  PeppeJ Mar 25 '11 at 12:03
1  
It's a cast. It tells the compiler that this instance of type Ship really is an instance of type Enemy. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '11 at 12:06
1  
+1 for demonstration of the correct technique for a safe cast (that is what is being asked for). ElementAt is still bad - but that's external to the typing problem. –  David B Mar 25 '11 at 12:27

You absolutely do not want to use ElementAt() like this, as it iterates over the start of the sequence every time. I would suggest using a foreach loop and OfType<>() instead:

foreach (var e in Game1.Ships.OfType<Enemy>())
{
    if (this.collisionBox.Intersects(e.collisionBox))
        e.Destroy(false);
}

Or, if Game1.Ships implements ICollection, you could use your for loop and replace .ElementAt(i) with [i]:

for (int i = 0; i < Game1.Ships.Count; i++)
{
    var e = Game1.Ships[i] as Enemy;
    if (e != null)
        if (this.collisionBox.Intersects(e.collisionBox))
            e.Destroy(false);
}
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It doesn't work with the foreach loop since it is actively modifying the size of the list thus breaking it. I'm testing your for loop atm though –  PeppeJ Mar 25 '11 at 12:14
    
If Destroy is actively modifying the list, then you'll want to enumerate over the list backwards: for(int i = Game1.Ship.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--) –  dahlbyk Mar 25 '11 at 12:23

and consider

 foreach (var e in Game.Ships.OfType<IDestroy>())
     e.Destroy()

This would seem to be a nice strategy seeing that

"Ship" does not have a Destroy(bool) by default, it's only exsists on "Enemy" & "Enemy2"

I you cannot/will not add the interface to make it easy to select the ship types then you could resort to

var destroyables = Game.Ships
           .OfType<Enemy>()
     .Concat(
           Game.Ships.OfType<Enemy2>());

Do I need to point out which method would have my vote ?

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This isn't semantically the same. It is, however, if you add the missing where clause and change IDestroy to Enemy. If you want to imply, that Enemy should implement IDestroy while the other classes shouldn't, please explain your reasoning, behind this. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '11 at 12:05
    
Adding more detail to post. Note I'm contributing ideas here, not instant-solutions :) –  sehe Mar 25 '11 at 12:07
    
That's exactly, why I think you should elaborate a bit, because the OP obviously is still learning. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '11 at 12:09

Or LINQish:

var enemiesToDestroy = from enemy in Game1.Ships.OfType<Enemy>()
                       where this.collisionBox.Intersects(enemy.collisionBox)
                       select enemy;
enemiesToDestroy.ToList().ForEach(enemy => enemy.Destroy(false));

If you want to get rid of the ToList() conversion, define the following extension method

public static void ForEach<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Action<TSource>   action)
{
    foreach (TSource element in source)
        action (element);
}

And use it like this:

enemiesToDestroy.ForEach(enemy => enemy.Destroy(false));
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wrap your LINQ query in parenthesis and add ToList() at the end at it will even compile ;) –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '11 at 12:08
    
or enemiesToDestroy.ToList().ForEach(...). This will make the query reusable. Of course you should choose the correct approach for the specific situation –  sehe Mar 25 '11 at 12:12
    
Thats true, thanks :) Edited my answer. –  Florian Greinacher Mar 25 '11 at 12:16

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