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I'm trying to build a method that also acts like a generator function, at a flip of a switch (want_gen below).

Something like:

def optimize(x, want_gen):
    # ... declaration and validation code
    for i in range(100):
        # estimate foo, bar, baz
        # ... some code here

        x = calculate_next_x(x, foo, bar, baz)

        if want_gen:
           yield x

    if not want_gen:
       return x

But of course this doesn't work -- Python apparently doesn't allow yield and return in the same method, even though they cannot be executed simultaneously.

The code is quite involved, and refactoring the declaration and validation code doesn't make much sense (too many state variables -- I will end up with difficult-to-name helper routines of 7+ parameters, which is decidedly ugly). And of course, I'd like to avoid code duplication as much as possible.

Is there some code pattern that would make sense here to achieve the behaviour I want?


Why do I need that?

I have a rather complicated and time-consuming optimization routine, and I'd like to get feedback about its current state during runtime (to display in e.g. GUI). The old behaviour needs to be there for backwards compatibility. Multithreading and messaging is too much work for too little additional benefit, especially when cross-platform operation is necessary.

Edit: Perhaps I should have mentioned that since each optimization step is rather lengthy (there are some numerical simulations involved as well), I'd like to be able to "step in" at a certain iteration and twiddle some parameters, or abort the whole business altogether. The generators seemed like a good idea, since I could launch another iteration at my discretion, fiddling in the meantime with some parameters.

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If you are making a new version anyway, just leave the old version the way it is (for backwards compatibility), and make the new way under a different name while telling everybody to use that from now on.. Adding an alternative route in such a function will just reduce the performance for those using the old way (which would be acceptable) but also those that use the new way. –  poke Mar 25 '11 at 12:30
    
@poke: Indeed, I am well aware of the reduced performance (which is an issue). But the difference between the two versions is so small (three lines or so), that it doesn't make sense to have two versions (the method is ~50 lines w/ whitespace long, and modifications and fine tunning are to be expected, preserving the behaviour). –  mindcorrosive Mar 25 '11 at 12:34
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7 Answers

Since all you seem to want is some sort of feedback for a long running function, why not just pass in a reference to a callback procedure that will be called at regular intervals?

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That's a good idea which admittedly I haven't considered. See the edit to my question, though. Some rethinking of the whole approach I've taken seem to be warranted. –  mindcorrosive Mar 25 '11 at 12:48
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Kind of messy, but I think this does the same as your original code was asking:

def optimize(x, want_gen):
    def optimize_gen(x):
        # ... declaration and validation code
        for i in range(100):
            # estimate foo, bar, baz
            # ... some code here

            x = calculate_next_x(x, foo, bar, baz)

            if want_gen:
               yield x
    if want_gen:
        return optimize_gen(x)

    for x in optimize_gen(x):
        pass
    return x

Alternatively the for loop at the end could be written:

    return list(optimize_gen(x))[-1]

Now ask yourself if you really want to do this. Why do you sometimes want the whole sequence and sometimes only want the last element? Smells a bit fishy to me.

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It's not completely clear what you want to happen if you switch between generator and function modes.

But as a first try: perhaps wrap the generator version in a new method which explicitly throws away the intermediate steps?

def gen():
    for i in range(100):
        yield i

def wrap():
    for x in gen():
        pass
    return x

print "wrap=", wrap()

With this version you could step into gen() by looping over smaller numbers of the range, make adjustments, and then use wrap() only when you want to finish up.

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Well...we can always remember that yield wa simplemented in thelanguage as way to facilitate the existence of generator objects, but one can always implet them either from scratch, or getting the best of both worlds:

class  Optimize(object):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.x = x
    def __iter__(self):
        x = self.x
        # ... declaration and validation code
        for i in range(100):
            # estimate foo, bar, baz
            # ... some code here

            x = calculate_next_x(x, foo, bar, baz)
            yield x
    def __call__(self):
        gen = iter(self)
        return gen.next()

def optimize(x, wantgen):
    if wantgen:
        return iter(Optimize(x))
    else:
        return Optimize(x)()

Not that you dont even need the "optimize" function wrapper - I just put it in there so it becomes a drop-in replacement for your example (would it work).

The way the class is declared, you can do simply:

for y in Optimize(x):
    #code

to use it as a generator, or:

 k = Optimize(x)()

to use it as a function.

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I appreciate the effort, and the pattern is useful, but in this case adding a class on top of an already complex method is probably not a good idea. –  mindcorrosive Mar 25 '11 at 14:46
    
But you aren't adding anything on top of a method. Because you are most certainly not supposed to actually insert the function body into the loop in the __iter__ method. Python consists of lots of short functions, not big long ones, and you should (ideally) only be calling a single function in the loop, which in turn calls all the code for estimating foo,bar,baz and calculating the next x. –  AJMansfield Sep 17 '13 at 15:12
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An edit to my answer, why not just always yield? You can have a function which yields a single value. If you don't want that then just choose to have your function either return a generator itself or the value:

 def stuff(x, want_gen):
     if want_gen:
         def my_gen(x):
             #code with yield
         return my_gen
     else:
         return x

That way you are always returning a value. In Python, functions are objects.

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Does that mean that he has to use stuff(...)() to get to the iterator? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 25 '11 at 12:09
    
@Lasse V. Karlsen He's have to to do that. His only other option I think would be to have the function yield a single value. –  wheaties Mar 25 '11 at 12:18
    
Actually it means he would need stuff(something, True)(something). I expect he meant to actually call the generator but forgot. –  Duncan Mar 25 '11 at 12:20
    
That won't work: return x will surely return the value of the parameter x, not its updated value (the generator is not called if want_gen==False). But I see where you're getting at. –  mindcorrosive Mar 25 '11 at 13:00
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Simplest is to write two methods, one the generator and the other calling the generator and just returning the value. If you really want one function with both possibilities, you can always use the want_gen flag to test what sort of return value, returning the iterator produced by the generator function when True and just the value otherwise.

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How about this pattern. Make your 3 line of changes to convert the function to a generator. Rename it to NewFunctionName. Replace the existing function with one that either returns the generator if want_gen is True, or exhausts the generator and returns the final value.

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