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Assume we build an object to represent some network (social, wireless, whatever). So we have some 'node' object to represent the KIND of network, different nodes might have different behaviors and so forth. The network has a MutableList of nodes.

But each node has neighbors, and these neighbors are also nodes. So somewhere, there has to be a list, per node, of all of the neighbors of that node--or such a list has to be generated on the fly whenever it is needed. If the list of neighbors is stored in the node objects, is it cheaper to store it (a) as a list of nodes, or (b) as list of numbers that can be used to reference nodes out of the network?

Some code for clarity:

//approach (a)

class network {
  val nodes = new MutableList[Node]
  // other stuff //
}

class Node {
  val neighbors = new MutableList[Node]
  // other stuff //
}

//approach (b)
class Network {
  val nodes = new MutableList[Node]
  val indexed_list = //(some function to get an indexed list off nodes)
//other stuff//
}

class Node {
  val neighbors = MutableList[Int]
//other stuff//
}

Approach (a) seems like the easiest. My first question is whether this is costly in Scala 2.8, and the second is whether it breaks the principle of DRY?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Short answer: premature optimization is the root of etc. Use the clean reference approach. When you have performance issues there's no substitute for profiling and benchmarking.

Long answer: Scala uses the exact same reference machinery as Java so this is really a JVM question more than a Scala question. Formally the JVM spec doesn't say one word about how references are implemented. In practice they tend to be word sized or smaller pointers that either point to an object or index into a table that points to the object (the later helps garbage collectors).

Either way, an array of refs is about the same size as a array of ints on a 32 bit vm or about double on a 64bit vm (unless compressed-oops are used). That doubling might be important to you or might not.

If you go with the ref based approach, each traversal from a node to a neighbor is a reference indirection. With the int based approach, each traversal from a node to a neighbor is a lookup into a table and then a reference indirection. So the int approach is more expensive computationally. And that's assuming you put the ints into a collection that doesn't box the ints. If you do box the ints then it's just pure craziness because now you've got just as many references as the original AND you've got a table lookup.

Anyway, if you go with the reference based approach then the extra references can make a bit of extra work for a garbage collector. If the only references to nodes lie in one array then the gc will scan that pretty damn fast. If they're scattered all over in a graph then the gc will have to work harder to track them all down. That may or may not affect your needs.

From a cleanliness standpoint the ref based approach is much nicer. So go with it and then profile to see where you're spending your time. That or benchmark both approaches.

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The question is - what kind of a cost? Memory-wise, the b) approach would probably end up consuming more memory, since you have both mutable lists, and boxed integers in that list, and another global structure holding all the indices. Also, it would probably be slower because you would need several levels of indirection to reach the neighbour node.

One important note - as soon as you start storing integers into mutable lists, they will undergo boxing. So, you will have a list of heap objects in both cases. To avoid this, and furthermore to conserve memory, in the b) approach you would have to keep a dynamically grown array of integers that are the indices of the neighbours.

Now, even if you modify the approach b) as suggested above, and make sure the indexed list in the Network class is really an efficient structure (a direct lookup table or a hash table), you would still pay an indirection cost to find your Node. And memory consumption would still be higher. The only benefit I see is in keeping some sort of a table of weak references if you're concerned you might run out of memory, and recreate the Node object when you need it and you cannot find it in your indexed_list which keeps a set of weak references.

This is, of course, just a hypothesis, you would have to profile/benchmark your code to see the difference.

My suggestion would be to use something like an ArrayBuffer in Node and use it store direct references to nodes.

If memory concerns are an issue, and you want to do the b) approach together with weak references, then I would further suggest rolling in your own dynamically grown integer-array for neighbours, to avoid boxing with ArrayBuffer[Int].

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