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Suppose I have something like this:

class Father {
    public:
      virtual int genericMethod (void) =0;
  };

class Son1: public Father {
  public:
    int genericMethod ()
      { }
  };

class Son2: public Father {
  public:
    int genericMethod ()
      { }
    int specifClassMethod()
      { }
  };

In the main I do the following:

Father * test = new Son2();

test->specifClassMethod(); //Can't do this! It is specific of Class Son2 and is not a virtual method in class Father!

The main question here is to know the better way to access Son2 specific method through Father interface. I want to know if there is a Design Pattern to solve this or another way. I don't wanna to do casts and I don't wanna to put lots of 'if' in my code.

Regards,

Eduardo

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1  
Your example is a bit contrived, is it possible to make it more specific? –  Coda Mar 25 '11 at 12:23
    
To be more explicit than @Coda, what is the actual design that you're using, so that we can point the flaws in it ? If your design is ok, then dynamic_cast is your friend. Usually, using dynamic_cast is a sign of smelling code. –  Alexandre C. Mar 25 '11 at 12:27
    
Do not forget to add virtual destructor to the base class. Otherwise delete of "Father* test = ...; delete test;" will not call correct destructor. –  Konstantin Tenzin Mar 25 '11 at 12:36
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7 Answers

Maybe the Visitor-Pattern is the pattern you're looking for.

How Visitor Pattern avoid downcasting

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You couldn't legally solve this with a cast, either, because "test" is pointing to a Father object, not a Son2 object. Casting object types means "Trust me, compiler, this variable actually holds X". It doesn't somehow magically convert a base object into a derived object; it only tells the compiler something you already know that it does not.

If you want behavior that differs by derived class, then move the behavior into a virtual method -- i.e., the code that wants to call specificCLassMethod() belongs in a virtual method of Father.

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There is dynamic_cast for this purpose. –  Alexandre C. Mar 25 '11 at 12:25
    
No, thats not what dynamic_cast does at all: it cannot physically turn one type into another. If I have a pointer-to-base that's actually pointing to an instance of derived, or vice-versa, dynamic_cast can offset the pointer to account for vtbls or other hidden object-model issues. This is only valid if the real runtime type of the object is as I say it is. dynamic_cast can't magically add the member variables of Son2 to a Father instance. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Mar 25 '11 at 12:31
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Possible approach is to have specific interface with optional methods, and virtual method to get this interface in the base class (which may return zero):

class SpecificInterface {
public:
  virtual ~SpecificInterface()
  { }
  virtual int specifClassCmethod() = 0;
  { }
};

class Father {
  public:
    virtual int genericMethod (void) = 0;
    virtual SpecificInterface* getSpecificInterface (void) =0;
};

class Son1: public Father {
  public:
    int genericMethod ()
      { }
    SpecificInterface* getSpecificInterface (void)
      { return 0; }
  };

class Son2: public Father, public SpecificInterface {
  public:
    int genericMethod ()
      { }
    int specifClassCmethod()
      { }
    SpecificInterface* getSpecificInterface (void)
      { return this; }
  };

Usage is following:

Father * test = new Son1();
SpecificInterface * specificAPI = test->getSpecificInterface();
if( specificAPI )
  specificAPI->specifClassCmethod();
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No. To call methods which only exist in a child class, you'll have to cast to the ch ild class.

While you could create a map which maps function names to functions, add your functions to it from the child class' constructor and then use something like test->callMethod("name"); you'd have to make all those methods have the same signature or use varargs to pass arguments which is not very nice.

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You can static_cast<Son2*>(test)->specifClassCmethod(); but that only works if Father * test = new Son2();

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If you really have something specific to Son2 then dynamic_cast<> is what you should use. If it is something that could be added as a virtual function to the base class with a default empty behaviour, then you can solve your issue without a cast (but that is not what you wanted to do as you stated in the question)

One design pattern to solve your issue is to use a proxy object. That object would have all the methods susceptible to be called and delegate them to the real object or not.

Advantages of the proxy pattern:

  • you concentrate the logic needed to differentiate the objects behind to one place
  • you can add some logging easily
  • the client code remains simple and the Son classes clean from extra stuff
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First of all,you can not create an instance for the class "Father" because it is an abstract class(which has virtual int genericMethod (void) =0; -pure virtual function).Instead an instance can be assigned to it....

Like

Son1* obj_son = new Son1();
Father* obj = obj_son;
//now if you call generic method - son1 method will be called(Father method is over ridden)
obj->genericMethod();
//similarly for son2 class
Son2* obj_son2 = new Son2();
Father* obj2 = obj_son2;
obj2->genericMethod();
obj2->specifClassCmethod();
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