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I have a directory structure that looks like this:

c:\folderA\folderB\folderC\client1\f1\files
c:\folderA\folderB\folderC\client1\f2\files
c:\folderA\folderB\folderC\client2\f1\files
c:\folderA\folderB\folderC\client2\f2\files
c:\folderA\folderB\folderC\client3\f1\files
c:\folderA\folderB\folderC\client4\f2\files

I want to copy the content of the f1 folders in c:\tmp\ to get this

c:\tmp\client1\f1\files
c:\tmp\client2\f1\files
c:\tmp\client3\f1\files

I tried this :

copy-item -recur -path: "*/f1/" -destination: c:\tmp\

But it copies the contents without copying the structure correctly.

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7 Answers 7

Use xcopy or robocopy, both of which have been designed for exactly that purpose. Assuming your paths are only filesystem paths, of course.

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1  
I know but I'd like to do that in powershell because that's a part of a bigger script and I'm going to pipe the output of copy (using -PassThru) to other commands. –  Sylvain Mar 25 '11 at 15:40
    
you can use cmd /c xcopy to use xcopy from powershell –  Zachary Yates Apr 13 '14 at 1:46
    
@ZacharyYates: You can use xcopy to use xcopy from PowerShell. It's not a cmd built-in, so there is no need to use cmd /c here. –  Joey Apr 13 '14 at 8:30
    
@joey Didn't know that - awesome! –  Zachary Yates Apr 13 '14 at 9:06
    
few answers below speak to a -container switch, worth taking a look at. copy-item -container will do just that without all the extra work native to powershell. –  workabyte Aug 20 '14 at 17:40

Powershell:

$sourceDir = 'c:\folderA\folderB\folderC\client1\f1'
$targetDir = ' c:\tmp\'

Get-ChildItem $sourceDir -filter "*" -recurse | `
    foreach{ 
        $targetFile = $targetDir + $_.FullName.SubString($sourceDir.Length); 
        New-Item -ItemType File -Path $targetFile -Force;  
        Copy-Item $_.FullName -destination $targetFile 
    } 

Note:

  • The -filter "*" does not do anything. It is just here to illustrate if you want to copy some specific files. E.g. all *.config files.
  • Still have to call a New-Item with -Force to actually create the folder structure.
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I don't understand, is this powershell? Or a .bat script? Sorry I am new to NT –  Gabriel Fair May 14 '13 at 1:13
    
FWIW, this fails if you put a trailing directory separator on $sourceDir. –  Tim Martin Jun 4 '13 at 10:41
    
Works for PS 2.0 and PS 4.0 ? Mabye any differences in cmdlets. –  Kiquenet Apr 21 '14 at 12:01
    
The code above tries to create files of every folder. A fast fix would be to exclude the folders like so: foreach{ if( $_.Attributes -neq 'Directory' ){ $targetFile =... } } –  LosManos Jun 4 '14 at 14:20
1  
@LosManos, I thought the intent was to actually keep the exact folder structure. –  Sentient Jun 4 '14 at 18:42

I needed to do the same thing, so I found this command:

XCopy souce_path destination_path /E /C /I /F /R /Y

And in your case:

XCopy c:\folderA\folderB\folderC c:\tmp /E /C /I /F /R /Y

And if you need to exclude some items, create text file with a list of exclusions. E.g.:

Create text file 'exclude.txt' on drive C:\ and add this in it:

.svn
.git

And your copy command will look like this now:

XCopy c:\folderA\folderB\folderC c:\tmp /EXCLUDE:c:\exclude.txt /E /C /I /F /R /Y
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This was what I was looking for thanks. I also used the /w and /S to copy sub directories and to skip empty folders –  Gabriel Fair May 16 '13 at 5:30

The Container switch mantain the folder structure. Enjoy.

testing>> tree
Folder PATH listing
Volume serial number is 12D3-1A3F
C:.
├───client1
│   ├───f1
│   │   └───files
│   └───f2
│       └───files
├───client2
│   ├───f1
│   │   └───files
│   └───f2
│       └───files
├───client3
│   └───f1
│       └───files
└───client4
    └───f2
        └───files
testing>> ls client* | % {$subdir=(join-path $_.fullname f1); $dest=(join-path temp ($_
.name +"\f1"));if(test-path ($subdir)){ copy-item $subdir $dest -recurse -container -fo
rce}}
testing>> tree
Folder PATH listing
Volume serial number is 12D3-1A3F
C:.
├───client1
│   ├───f1
│   │   └───files
│   └───f2
│       └───files
├───client2
│   ├───f1
│   │   └───files
│   └───f2
│       └───files
├───client3
│   └───f1
│       └───files
├───client4
│   └───f2
│       └───files
└───temp
    ├───client1
    │   └───f1
    │       └───files
    ├───client2
    │   └───f1
    │       └───files
    └───client3
        └───f1
            └───files
testing>>
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though your answer is correct its not clear, may want to add a very simple example call at the top to help clarify. I read the answer but it seemed convoluted so i moved on looking for another solution (coming back i see that its the same solution i found but not as clear as it could be). –  workabyte Aug 20 '14 at 15:41

there is another answer here with the same solution though it is not very clear so I will throw this in as it took me a while to find this answer.

I have been digging around and found a lot of solutions to this issue, all being some alteration not just a straight copy-item command. Grant it some of these questions predate PS 3.0 so the answers are not wrong but using powershell 3.0 I was finally able to accomplish this using the -Container switch for copy-item.

Copy-Item $from $to -Recurse -Container

this was the test i ran, no errors and destination folder represented the same folder structure.

New-Item -ItemType dir -Name test_copy
New-Item -ItemType dir -Name test_copy\folder1
New-Item -ItemType file -Name test_copy\folder1\test.txt
#NOTE: with no \ at the end of the destination the file is created in the root of the destination, does not create the folder1 container
#Copy-Item D:\tmp\test_copy\* D:\tmp\test_copy2 -Recurse -Container

#if the destination does not exists this created the matching folder structure and file with no errors
Copy-Item D:\tmp\test_copy\* D:\tmp\test_copy2\ -Recurse -Container

hope this helps someone

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In Powershell version 3.0 and newer this is done very simple this way

Get-ChildItem -Path $sourceDir | Copy-Item -Destination $targetDir -Recurse -Container

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If you want to correctly copy a folder structure correctly with PowerShell, do it like so:

$sourceDir = 'C:\source_directory'
$targetDir = 'C:\target_directory'

Get-ChildItem $sourceDir -Recurse | % {
   $dest = $targetDir + $_.FullName.SubString($sourceDir.Length)

   If (!($dest.Contains('.')) -and !(Test-Path $dest))
   {
        mkdir $dest
   }

   Copy-Item $_.FullName -Destination $dest -Force
}

This accounts for creating directories and just copying the files. Of course you'll need to modify the Contains() call above if you folders contain periods or add a filter if you want to search for "f1" as you mentioned.

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